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How will we get our networking issues with SL resolved?

11195 Views 69 Replies Latest reply: Oct 26, 2009 8:09 PM by William Kucharski RSS
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    kevkline,

    I do have one suggestion that comes to mind. Look in /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/. Drag all of the files there to your trash, then restart (you'll have to authenticate in order to do this, but that's OK).

    It might fix your issues, or it might not. You may lose some settings in the process, and have to set up your connections again. If this provides some relief, it will be worth the trouble. If not, you can move the re-created files to a temporary folder, then drag the originals back in and restart again.

    Scott
    17" Macbook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6)
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    new2appletv,

    See my response to Kevkline. The (potentially, maybe, perhaps, try it and see) fix I gave to him might apply to you as well. It's worth a try.

    Please do note that my statement was: "Network connections are certainly not problematic in Snow Leopard as a whole. I am well aware that there may be conflicts with specific routers, configurations, or environments, and I am not discounting these possibilities. What I am definitely stating is that, whatever is occurring for those having difficulty, it is not some fundamental fault in Snow Leopard's networking.

    Trust me when I state that I've seen and experienced such a "fundamental fault," and when I state that it doesn't currently exist. In fact, I and many others with whom I have communicated have the general impression that networking- and particularly wireless networking- is better in Snow Leopard than it has ever been. Overall (and I really want to stress this adjective).

    No, whatever this is, it is much more specific. The task at hand is to identify where the problem lies. Would you not agree that the best place to start in that effort is by identifying where it's not? That's what I attempted to do.

    In any case, try my suggestion and let us know if there is any change. I'll be honest; it's a shot in the dark, but one that has worked in some cases in the past.

    Scott
    17" Macbook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6)
  • kevkline Calculating status...
    Checked the etc/resolv.conf on a Leopard Machine. File looked as expected:
    ********************************
    domain mycompany.com
    nameserver 1.1.1.1
    nameserver 2.2.2.2
    nameserver 3.3.3.3
    ********************************

    HOWEVER, now when I look at the etc/resolv.conf on my Snow Leopard machine, it has a very fundamental difference:

    ********************************
    #
    # Mac OSX Notice
    #
    # This file is not used by the host name and address resolution
    # or the DNS query routing mechanisms used by most processes on
    # this Mac OSX system.
    #
    # This file is automatically generated.
    #
    domain mycompany.com
    nameserver 1.1.1.1
    nameserver 2.2.2.2
    nameserver 3.3.3.3
    ********************************


    If it doesn't use resolv.conf anymore

    a.) Why is it there and populated with values from my DHCP/DNS Server?
    b.) What IS it using for DNS?
    MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.5.5)
  • Snoop Dogg Level 4 Level 4 (1,265 points)
    It's there to support legacy clients that rely on resolve.conf. The system in general uses the DNS configuration as seen by running "scutil --dns" in Terminal.
    MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6)
  • TomDefyingLife Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    Just thought I'd post giving my issues

    Im just getting a stupidly slow connection since upgrading to SL. I was gettin 5-6mbps before (and still am on my xp machine) and Im barely getting 1mbps now

    I'll keep following this post and hopefully it will be resolved soon!! not enjoying it at all.
    Macbook Pro 13", Mac OS X (10.5.8), Total Mac Noob
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    kevkline and new2appletv ,

    Well, it appears that we have some commonality here, but let's make sure. Neither of you have difficulty actually connecting to your wireless router/access point, but you are not able to "get out" to the internet. Both of you are perfectly able to connect using ethernet, with full functionality. Is this all correct for both of you?

    I would like you to open /System/Library/CoreServices/Network Diagnostics. Place the Network Diagnostics window such that it will remain visible to you. With your Airport connection to your router all set up, use the Airport menu to toggle Airport off, then on again. Watch the Network Diagnostics window to get an idea of how well, and how quickly, each of the steps in the process complete. Repeat this several times, and note if the behaviors are consistent or not. Please post back with your findings and impressions.

    It would also be very useful if you could perform these same steps while attempting to connect through some other wireless network, with entirely different hardware. We could then compare any differences in both your experience and the behaviors indicated by Network Diagnostics, perhaps isolating this to your specific network hardware in the process.

    Scott
    17" Macbook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6)
  • Statman1 Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    well new2...just to let you know, I have basically the same issues you have...I have also talked to three specialists at apple and they don't have a clue either...it's frustrating as I have another mac (pro) on the same network with the same software and it works perfectly...just a problem with the macbook (and I got it to work 3 times....as soon as I rebooted it was gone). I still think it has something to do with the process that SL goes through to ask for DHCP assignment, but what do I know. Anyway, I'll keep checking back for updates.
    MacBook (10.5.8), Mac Pro (10.6), iMac (10.5.8), AEBS 7.4.2
  • Michael Mclaughlin2 Calculating status...
    Now that I'm home I can confirm that my home network is also WPA2 Personal, so for me at least, the problem with my wireless is when base stations are setup to work with WPA Personal and WPA2 Personal at the same time. I haven't tried a WPA only network yet, but when my base stations are set to WPA2 Personal I have NO problem connecting and have a working IP network.

    Something I didn't mention earlier is that even when my IP network wasn't working, the finder would show the computers on the network in the Bonjour using 'Shared' area in the sidebar...
    MacBook Pro (15-inch Mid/Late 2007), Mac OS X (10.6)
  • Statman1 Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    well my AEBS is set to WPA2 personal and always has been...I've been through every security config you can do...LOL
    MacBook (10.5.8), Mac Pro (10.6), iMac, Mac OS X (10.5.8)
  • Scott Radloff Level 6 Level 6 (14,490 points)
    Michael,

    So, you have no trouble staying connected to your own home network with WPA2 Personal, but you do have a problem with a network at work that implements both WPA and WPA2 simultaneously (is that right?). Is all this correct?

    I think it would be instructive if you were to perform the Network Diagnostic test I described above in your work environment. I will be looking for an apparently flawless connection to both your network and the internet. That's what I think you'll find, narrowing this down to a DNS problem, and a DNS problem only.

    Scott
    17" Macbook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6)
  • Michael Mclaughlin2 Level 1 Level 1 (20 points)
    I think that is why we haven't heard anything official from Apple yet. Fixes for "networking problems" after the Snow Leopard install seem to work for some but never everyone. Personally, I'm just glad that I've figured out what's seems to be the problem with my mine.
    MacBook Pro (15-inch Mid/Late 2007), Mac OS X (10.5.8)
  • James Schnoor Calculating status...
    Just for giggles (and possible resolution) you might try adding the following to your DNS entries: 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220. The problem you describe sounds similar to one of the problems that I had with 10.5.

    Peace,
    Iggy
    MacBooK Pro, 17", 2.8Ghz, 4GB, 500GB, Mac OS X (10.6), G4 DP 867, 2GB, 500GB HDD, Superdrive. G4 350, 2GB RAM, 250GB HDD, Superdrive
  • William Lloyd Level 6 Level 6 (19,205 points)
    Sorry, but there are no systemic networking issues that affect the product as a whole. There may be instances with specific combinations of hardware, but I seriously know hundreds if not thousands of people using Snow, and "Networking doesn't work" is not a problem I have heard, generally.

    IMO it is better to focus on what is common to the machines having a problem. It's not just like "Networking is broken," as I'll wager that is tested extensively by thousands of people during development and beta and release, continuously.

    Focus on what's unique and what could be contributing to the problem. I can virtually guarantee it's another device or application affecting the network stack. Crappy router? Little Snitch?
    8-Core Mac Pro, Mac OS X (10.6)

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