7 Replies Latest reply: Oct 1, 2009 11:32 PM by mr chop
mr chop Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)
I no this is not the ideal set up but its all I have at the moment.
I’m shooting in HDV 1080i I’m editing on a late 08 mac book pro with final cut studio 2. The footage is captured as HDV. Render setting for the sequence is set to proress.

If I send the project to apple color and correct/send back to fcp what do I get back? Is it proress 1440x1080 or proress 1920x1080? Also as I’m shooting in 1080i do I need to de interlace the footage to work with color?. Some people are telling me I need to others are telling me it doesn’t matter or do I only need to deinterlace if I’m applying a grade and not just correcting it?.

Thank you very much for any help.

mac book pro, Mac OS X (10.5.8)
  • 1. Re: HDV1080i question
    JP Owens Level 4 Level 4 (2,015 points)
    I think you get back 1920x1080 ProRes square from COLOR. At least you should.
    Open the attributes dialog.

    You do not need to deinterlace the footage unless you start messing around with Geometry and ColorFX. Geometry will be irrelevant in a Roundtrip workflow because the render engine will ignore all COLOR-originated geometry changes, but translations, scaling, blurs and so on that are constructed in the FX room will cause major issues. Then you need to build a deinterlace/reinterlace tree, which may or may not help.

    jPo

    Message was edited by: JP Owens
  • 2. Re: HDV1080i question
    Patrick Inhofer Level 3 Level 3 (505 points)
    {quote:title=mr chop wrote:}
    If I send the project to apple color and correct/send back to fcp what do I get back? Is it proress 1440x1080 or proress 1920x1080?{quote}


    1920x1080. Color will create the footage as full raster. The timeline it sends back to FCP will be full raster.

    Any moves you've applied or repo's you've done to the footage will need to be redone since the Motion Tab numbering system is different when you change from 1440 pixels to 1920 pixels. This can be a total pain if you have lots of animating stills. Be prepared to re-do mucho repositioning work.

    {quote:title=mr chop wrote:}
    Also as I’m shooting in 1080i do I need to de interlace the footage to work with color?. Some people are telling me I need to others are telling me it doesn’t matter or do I only need to deinterlace if I’m applying a grade and not just correcting it?.
    {quote}


    It's official - stop asking any of those people Color-related questions. They're all wrong.

    JPo is correct - no need to deinterlace unless you're in the FX room and applying nodes with scale functions and never use the Geometery Room to make size or position changes for interlaced material. Follow those two simple rules and you can ignore the "progressiveness" of your footage.

    HTH

    - pi
  • 3. Re: HDV1080i question
    mr chop Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)
    thanks for the info, at last I feel like Im getting somewhere!.

    at the moment Im not doing any thing with the colour fx or geometry.

    Im looking at getting a sony ex3 as my next camera what issues will this cause in color? just asking as 1080i HDV seems to be a not good format for working in clour.

    thnaks again for the info
  • 4. Re: HDV1080i question
    mr chop Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)
    thanks for the info, just so I have this right in my head, as long as Im doing nothing with scale or re framing I dont have to worry about the deinterlace/reinterlace?.

    from reading JPos post it sounded like if I was doing any hting in the color fx room meant I needed to do deinterlace/reinterlace.

    thanks again for your help
  • 5. Re: HDV1080i question
    JP Owens Level 4 Level 4 (2,015 points)
    Deinterlacing is a bit of a moving target in COLOR -- the fundamental question that you need to ask yourself is "Am I moving the location of a pixel?" -- blur? 2D Translation? If the answer is yes or maybe, then do it.

    HDV handling is massively improved, but its Long-GOP nature means that it is always being i-Frame interpolated and the behaviour of any particular frame, and the time code where it resides, is slightly dynamic. It is massively compressed and is extremely vulnerable to certain kinds of motion defects. If you need an iron-clad format, this isn't it, but if you are committed to a lifetime of vigilance, then it can be made to work. It depends on how much time, effort, and patience you can commit.

    jPo
  • 6. Re: HDV1080i question
    Patrick Inhofer Level 3 Level 3 (505 points)
    mr chop wrote:
    Im looking at getting a sony ex3 as my next camera what issues will this cause in color? just asking as 1080i HDV seems to be a not good format for working in clour.


    ex3 is a good camera. Stick to the Cine4 gamma settings until you get comfortable with the camera and understand how the gammas work. I've seen some ugly blownout highlights that are majorly difficult to fix. Cine4 gamma setting doesn't have those same problems - it blows out very naturally.

    I have zero problems working with HDV footage in Color. I've done many HDV jobs and in terms of being able to push pixels to fix problems and make interesting pictures - I often find it easier to work with than many of the 4:2:2 codecs. Don't know why. Just is.

    'dem are my .02.

    - pi
  • 7. Re: HDV1080i question
    mr chop Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)
    thanks to both of you for all the info. for now I will carry on, I will switch cameras next year!