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Question about push notification

11630 Views 9 Replies Latest reply: Aug 16, 2010 6:52 PM by MathanM RSS
MathanM Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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Oct 19, 2009 12:55 AM
I am currenty on a cap plan with limited amounts of Internet. How much internet approx does push notification use? So that at least I have an idea of how much I can use mobile me.

Thanks
Intel iMac Dual Core 2.0Ghz, Mac OS X (10.5.5)
  • beagleman2009 Level 1 Level 1 (50 points)
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    Oct 19, 2009 3:22 AM (in response to MathanM)
    All push notification does is to automaticly send no info to your phone like email and any app info if you have that turned on so how much comes in is up to you there is really no way to tell how much that depends on you and how much content you have pushed to your phone you can go into your setting and change it to fetch so that the only time info is sent to your phone is when you fetch.
    dell optiplex g270, Windows XP Pro, none
  • neuroanatomist Level 7 Level 7 (31,685 points)
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    Oct 19, 2009 5:06 AM (in response to MathanM)
    Kilobytes. The amount of actual data in calendar events is minimal. For reference, the entire 2009 Boston Red Sox season schedule (which contains 162 events) is a 48 KB file. Obviously, emails can vary, especially if there are large attachments.
    17" CD MBP, iPhone 3G, iPodTouch, Mac OS X (10.5.8),  since the ][e
  • tokatta Level 3 Level 3 (865 points)
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    Oct 19, 2009 5:49 AM (in response to MathanM)
    Also, keep in mind, that push means a constant connection. there are always packets sent just to make sure things are alive at each end.

    The danger of using push on a limited data plan is that someone can send you something big, or you could get many small things - without much control 24 hours per day. If you have no changes to calendar and contacts, you are still paying for keep alive packets. If you are home, and someone sends you a bunch of pictures, you get them on your PC but they will get pushed to your phone, even if you are home. With manual fetch, you have more control.

    If you were check email every 15 minutes, you would probably use more data then if push were on (assuming no email in either case) so things could go either way.
    HAL, Other OS, The size of a spaceship
  • Lawrence Finch Level 7 Level 7 (24,510 points)
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    Oct 19, 2009 6:19 AM (in response to MathanM)
    MathanM wrote:
    I am currenty on a cap plan with limited amounts of Internet. How much internet approx does push notification use? So that at least I have an idea of how much I can use mobile me.

    It depends on how much email you get, the size of messages, and how often you update contacts and calendar. In general push will use less data than fetch, because fetch establishes a connection every 15 minutes (or whatever you have it set to). Push only establishes a connection when there is an update to be synced. Unless you regularly get large attachments your email usage will be pretty small, and correspond to the total size of the emails you send and receive. Web browsing and use of data-intensive applications (like Google Maps) will be the vast majority of your data usage.
    Lenovo T-60, Intel iMac , Dell/Ubuntu 8, iPhone 3GS 3.1, Windows XP Pro, Leopard 10.5.4
  • neuroanatomist Level 7 Level 7 (31,685 points)
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    Oct 19, 2009 8:27 AM (in response to Lawrence Finch)
    Lawrence Finch wrote:
    In general push will use less data than fetch, because fetch establishes a connection every 15 minutes (or whatever you have it set to). Push only establishes a connection when there is an update to be synced.


    Push requires a constant 'live' connection to the server. This connection is kept 'live' by frequent pings from the iPhone - more frequent than the 15 minute fetch interval. That's the reason Apple recommends turning off Push to save battery life.
    17" CD MBP, iPhone 3G, iPodTouch, Mac OS X (10.5.8),  since the ][e
  • Lawrence Finch Level 7 Level 7 (24,510 points)
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    Oct 19, 2009 8:45 AM (in response to neuroanatomist)
    I've noticed no measurable difference in battery life between push on or off, except when the mail app is having problems connecting.
    Lenovo T-60, Intel iMac , Dell/Ubuntu 8, iPhone 3GS 3.1, Windows XP Pro, Leopard 10.5.4
  • tokatta Level 3 Level 3 (865 points)
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    Oct 19, 2009 3:24 PM (in response to Lawrence Finch)
    There is also more data sent when doing a fetch then there is for the ActiveSync keep alive.

    With Push the connection is establish and there is an occasional heartbeat packet that is not that big.

    With Fetch a TCP connection is setup and torn down every time, followed by the POP3 or Imap login credentials. If you add SSL on top, you wind up tripling the number of packets and data passed.

    In my testing Push (Exchange Active Sync) has a less impact on battery use then Fetch at 15 minute intervals. Fetch every hour or manually seems to work fine, but every 15 minutes is big drain.
    HAL, Other OS, The size of a spaceship

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