6 Replies Latest reply: Nov 22, 2009 9:54 AM by cornelius
ochayethenoojimmy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
Since the new version of OSX is not compatible with iBook, does that mean this platform is no longer supported by Apple? This would really be aggravating since I bought the iBook at the end of 2005, and I have never seen a computer that was dead-ended after three years. At the least Apple should have made their plans to stop OS upgrades in three years clear.

With all the instability I haven endured with this system I was hoping that OS bug fixes were the solution, but that appears gone now.

Will Apple offer any upgrade options (e.g. to macbook) to those stranded on this platform, who recently started supporting it by switching? If not, this will make the switchback a no-brainer.

Any pointers to how Apple has responded to similar questions will be appreciated.

iBook G4
  • 1. Re: iBook G4 a dead end?
    John Huber1 Level 6 Level 6 (17,745 points)
    If you have instability issues it's probably not the OS. If you are running new apps they may be the problem. Be sure all apps are compatible with Panther.I have run 10.3.9 on a G4 desktop for years (and it runs 24/7) without any stability problems.

    You may want to backup your data and reinstall Panther and the updates.

    John
  • 2. Re: iBook G4 a dead end?
    cornelius Level 6 Level 6 (17,825 points)
    jimmy:

    Welcome to Apple Discussions.

    There are lots of folks who are running Panther, Tiger and Leopard on their iBook G4 quite well. While iBooks have had some issues, they are basically hardware. May I suggest that if you have instability issues with your current installation that you post about them. None of us have anything to do with Apple's development and release of products, so we can't help with that. We may be able to help you sort out your OS stability issue.

    cornelius
  • 3. Re: iBook G4 a dead end?
    ochayethenoojimmy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    I'm running OSX 10.4.11 with all the patches installed as the OS recommends them. The instability is mostly hanging applications that can't even be force-quit, shutdowns/restarts that never complete, and inability to reliably return from sleep mode, wifi / bluetooth instability, etc. These have been happening for years... you just get used to it after a while. I don't run any applications usually other than Safari and the other Apple apps that come with the OS.

    I'm not really looking to debug this, I know how to do those things as well as anyone. My main question is how Apple is handling the end-of-life issues for the platform, especially for people like me that began supporting it just before Apple pulled the plug on the iBook platform. To me, it makes sense to offer an upgrade discount/trade-in. I would much rather have another MacBook (I have one and am happy with it).
  • 4. Re: iBook G4 a dead end?
    Lyssa Level 6 Level 6 (15,515 points)
    ochayethenoojimmy wrote:
    These have been happening for years... you just get used to it after a while.


    This is where you went wrong. A computer should "just work" as long as you don't inflict anything unusual on it. The user shouldn't have to "put up" with any issues.

    My iBook, after a few minor repairs in the first year, is still running like a champ 5 years later. There's a good chance yours could do the same, if you looked into figuring out why things aren't working as they should.

    To me, it makes sense to offer an upgrade discount/trade-in. I would much rather have another MacBook (I have one and am happy with it).


    I know of no computer company that offers an upgrade discount in exchange for an older computer. All I've ever heard of is companies offering free recycling for an old machine.

    My main question is how Apple is handling the end-of-life issues for the platform, especially for people like me that began supporting it just before Apple pulled the plug on the iBook platform.


    The iBook is by no means at the "end of life" stage in general. Personally, you may feel yours doesn't quite meet your needs, but an iBook, especially one running Tiger, has plenty of use, and will for a while yet.

    ~Lyssa
  • 5. Re: iBook G4 a dead end?
    K Shaffer Level 6 Level 6 (9,215 points)
    Had the issues been reported while the computer had AppleCare protection coverage
    on the hardware during the first full year after purchase (and 90-days support) or if
    you had extended the AppleCare via the additional Plan coverage so as to add another
    two years on top of the original gratis plan, and discussed the matters with AppleCare
    or some service tech in a retail environment near you, who could have ticketed hardware
    issues for troubleshooting and sought to find out causes other than software, you may
    have been in line for some kind of deal, back in the day, to have adjustments on the iBook.

    Mine has worked just fine, and is probably the same model if not older. Yet I'm willing to
    bet mine has less hours of runtime and would be less likely to have issues now as a
    result of that slight use differential over those years.

    If you are in a position to archive all your own works or clone the contents of the iBook
    to a suitable firewire enclosed hard disk drive with oxford chipset capable of booting
    OSX and running your computer from a clone inside it; you could use Disk Utility after
    cloning a copy of your computer's full drive content to the FireWire unit, to totally secure
    erase the hard disk drive. That's overwrite with zeros then reformat, and a full new install.

    If the computer has seen significant use patterns since it was new, the internal hard disk
    drive may also be about ready to fail. They run long, hard and relatively fast for 3-5 years.
    If the RAM was upgraded, perhaps the brand or quality of added RAM was inadequate.
    Some brands just weren't up to the decent level of quality Apple hardware. (But mine is.)

    So, there could be both software and hardware causes behind the issues and symptoms
    you have noted with the computer for however so many years of use. Some of this is up
    to you as an informed owner of a retail product with some of the best support ever. And
    as an informed user/owner, I learned how to make bootable clones of my computers so
    as to know I had the content secure before taking a computer in for a repair, one that a
    shop some distance from me botched; so I did the troubleshooting and worked with the
    AppleCare people directly to get the shop in AK just fix what I found was wrong, since
    that shop was unable or unwilling to thoroughly test my under AppleCare iMac G4. And
    since I had previous off-warranty computer repair experience, my hands were tied with
    the rules that AppleCare has in place for quality control. So I had to take it long distance
    to find the shop unable to find anything wrong; yet I could repeatedly once it was home.
    I drove 3,000 miles with the iMac in my truck; and spent over 6 months hassling with it.
    But did not ask for another computer; since it was hard to get the one I wanted.

    Given the circumstances, and your belated interest in resolving any early known issues,
    while the Apple people, even in sales support, may have been able to help you, I can't see
    any reason to even go further. If you see what I mean, by trying to get an issue resolved.
    Until you drive your iBook a few thousand miles and buy a second new computer so you
    can troubleshoot the first one for the Authorized Reseller's service department, don't gripe.

    If the hard disk drive is failing, finally, a diagnostic could determine that. If bad RAM has
    been installed at an early date, removing it should show a change. Reset PRAM if RAM
    has been added or removed to have the system see the difference correctly. If you have
    access to a decent FireWire enclosed hard disk drive capable of booting OS X, try and
    use it to install a boot system via your iBook; then run the computer from the external.
    That should prove something or another. I know it would tell me a thing or two; and I do
    have and keep clones of my healthy systems on a partitioned external FW HDD.

    Good luck & happy computing!
  • 6. Re: iBook G4 a dead end?
    cornelius Level 6 Level 6 (17,825 points)
    I'm not really looking to debug this, I know how to do those things as well as anyone. My main question is how Apple is handling the end-of-life issues for the platform, especially for people like me that began supporting it just before Apple pulled the plug on the iBook platform.

    Since you know how to troubleshoot and sort out your issue I suggest you do so. Letting it go for years suggests otherwise, but that is not our concern. It is your computer. Computer technology moves an at ever increasing pace, especially as computers are being designed by computers. The trend is not likely to slow down or stop. You may continue to use the older technology if it meets your needs. However, it is unreasonable to expect it to do what the newer technology can do. The iBooks and PowerPC platform performs well within the paramenters for which they are designed. The Intel platform is a different technology. Leopard can be run on PPC platform computers that meet the technical specifications. Snow Leopard operates in a 64-bit environment and PPC Macs don't. You have an option to use Leopard, but not Snow Leopard. This is not different from any other kind of equipment. Other computer manufacturers in the Windows-PC world have to do the same thing or perish. "Whom the gods can't lead, they drag." GM insisted on staying with outmoded engineering, resisting the move toward fuel efficiency and eco-friendliness. We all know the rest of that story.

    Good luck.

    cornelius