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Best SSD for MacBook Pro

374043 Views 100 Replies Latest reply: Mar 31, 2014 9:32 AM by Badsektor RSS
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IftiBashir Level 1 Level 1 (70 points)
Currently Being Moderated
May 27, 2010 3:19 AM
I have a 2010 MacBook Pro, and Im interested in purchasing a SSD.

Currently I have a 320GB drive, which is enough for me TBH, since I have most of my multimedia stuff on an external RAID storage drive - so I only have my basic files and everyday stuff on the MacBook itself.

Anyways, Im after a SSD to speed things up a little from a standard 5400rpm drive, but an unsure on which to go for, or which Apple recommend?

Also, if I want to move everything as I have it across, I assume I can do the following.......

1. Create a SuperDuper image of my disc onto an external HDD.
2. Open MacBook and swap out HDD for SSD.
3. Boot off of SuperDuper and restore the image.

Anything Im missing?
MacBook Pro 13 2.66GHz, Mac OS X (10.6.3)
  • Sascha H-K Level 2 Level 2 (330 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 27, 2010 3:56 AM (in response to IftiBashir)
    format new ssd in an extern usb-enclosure, let superduper clone and then fit ssd in your mbp.

    1. start takes longer, but after choosing it as startup volume you will be surprised.

    don't forget to dissable sudden motion sensor and mark no sleep for "hdd".

    best for sleep/wakeup is "smartsleep"-prefpane.
    MBP 17" i7 SSD, iMac 27" i7, G4 1.42, macbook pro 17" 2.4 4Gb, iPhone16Gb .., Mac OS X (10.6.3), MBP 17" 2.93, MacPro 3ghz, 30", 23",20" displays, TV, 5 airportExtreme ..
  • Chopper_MG Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 27, 2010 4:02 AM (in response to IftiBashir)
    Dont understand why people use SuperDuper or Clone Software when your
    Mac OSX CD can do it all for you. Also with being Apple. Must be better clone surely.
    Hence.
    Put New SSD in external enclosure
    Boot up from OSX CD
    Choose Disk Utility from Menu
    Restore from main to new SSD
    Swap over and set SSD to starup disk
    DONE DEAL
    Hope that helps
    Mac OS X (10.6.3)
  • Sascha H-K Level 2 Level 2 (330 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 27, 2010 4:08 AM (in response to Chopper_MG)
    to do it with superduper is better as you get the same result as the current hdd and you don't have to do any osX updates or similar ..

    i have 3 ssd's and tryed all possibilities.
    MBP 17" i7 SSD, iMac 27" i7, G4 1.42, macbook pro 17" 2.4 4Gb, iPhone16Gb .., Mac OS X (10.6.3), MBP 17" 2.93, MacPro 3ghz, 30", 23",20" displays, TV, 5 airportExtreme ..
  • eww Level 9 Level 9 (52,975 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 27, 2010 4:27 AM (in response to Chopper_MG)
    Chopper MG: Using SuperDuper (or Carbon Copy Cloner) as Sascha has described saves MANY hours of reinstalling software and reapplying updates, not only to the OS software but also to all your other installed software. Unless your system is completely kaput and needs an OS reinstall anyway, it's insane to start reinstalling everything from scratch just because you're replacing a hard drive. Cloning is the only sensible way to go.
    15" '08 UMBP 2.4GHz/4G/250G; TiBook 1GHz/1G/120G, Mac OS X (10.5.8), iTouch 32G, scanners, projector, tablet, laser & photo printers, Pentax K-7
  • Chopper_MG Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 27, 2010 9:42 AM (in response to IftiBashir)
    My way also CLONE's the drive.
    Restores the working hard disk drive with all updates and programs to external drive. Thus I have done this and have a complete backup of my system if it fails.
    You are also using Apple's OWN so must be better than 3rd party software and FOC
    Mac OS X (10.6.3)
  • eww Level 9 Level 9 (52,975 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 27, 2010 9:52 AM (in response to Chopper_MG)
    My way also CLONE's the drive.


    Ah, but you didn't mention anything about that in your first post, so no one knew that was what you were talking about.

    Yes, it's possible to clone a drive using Disk Utility. It doesn't offer any of the options that SuperDuper and Carbon Copy cloner offer, but it can be done. If you are stuck on the absurd presumption that everything can be done better using Apple software than it can with anyone else's, you're really missing a lot.
    15" '08 UMBP 2.4GHz/4G/250G; TiBook 1GHz/1G/120G, Mac OS X (10.5.8), iTouch 32G, scanners, projector, tablet, laser & photo printers, Pentax K-7
  • Milan Dandukovic Level 1 Level 1 (20 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 28, 2010 5:46 AM (in response to IftiBashir)
    Samsung or Intel.
    Those SSDs are really good, since the controller and the flash memory is built by the manufacturer, so there is no incompatibility issues as some SSDs have them with other controllers. I have a samsung SSD, but Intel has faster SSDs which cost more. If you have the money, go for Intel, if not, get a Samsung. You won't be wrong.
     MacBook Pro 2.53 GHz Core i5, Mac OS X (10.6.3), 4GB DDR3 RAM; 128 GB SSD ::  iPhone 3G 8GB
  • Sascha H-K Level 2 Level 2 (330 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 28, 2010 8:57 AM (in response to IftiBashir)
    i have intel 160gb, stt ultradrive 256gb and ocz vertex 250gb.

    on all of them also win7 on a boot camp partition.

    the fastest is ...., they are at least close together.

    the stt 256gb startsup in a half turn after the apple is visible, it takes 13sec. to desktop (from the gong to desktop) ...
    MBP 17" i7 SSD, iMac 27" i7, G4 1.42, macbook pro 17" 2.4 4Gb, iPhone16Gb .., Mac OS X (10.6.3), MBP 17" 2.93, MacPro 3ghz, 30", 23",20" displays, TV, 5 airportExtreme ..
  • Karel B Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 31, 2010 8:01 AM (in response to IftiBashir)
    I'd think twice before investing in a Samsung SSD http://www.anandtech.com/show/2829/19

    My researches indicate that Intel are the best, or for capacity per buck OCZ Vertex.

    As to their slowing down - yes, it does happen, by anything up to 20%, but since an SSD is 10x as fast as a 10,000rpm WD Velociraptor (and Apple laptop HDDs are only 5,000 rpm) you're still way ahead! And it'll take months of use to get there.

    As far as I understand it the slowing down can be cured by wiping the disk to get it back to as it was when new. Unfortunately neither erasing nor formatting will do this. On a PC you can do a 'secure erase' or on Windows 7 (only!) use something called the 'trim' command. Anyone know if there's an equivalent to doing this on a Mac..?

    Cheers!

    Oh, and is it possible to put 2 SSDs in a MacBook (though I doubt it)?
  • eww Level 9 Level 9 (52,975 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 31, 2010 9:21 AM (in response to Karel B)
    and Apple laptop HDDs are only 5,000 rpm


    The drives Apple offers in its notebook computers run at 5400 and 7200 RPM.

    Anyone know if there's an equivalent to doing this on a Mac..?


    Not at present.

    Oh, and is it possible to put 2 SSDs in a MacBook (though I doubt it)?


    Yes:

    http://www.mcetech.com/optibay/

    The Optibay enclosure replaces the MBP's optical drive. Installing one may jeopardize your Apple warranty.
    15" '08 UMBP 2.4GHz/4G/250G; TiBook 1GHz/1G/120G, Mac OS X (10.5.8), iTouch 32G, scanners, projector, tablet, laser and photo printers, Pentax K-7
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