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Removing Mouse Acceleration OSX

130196 Views 230 Replies Latest reply: Jan 23, 2014 11:14 AM by braindeath RSS Branched to a new discussion.
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lomis1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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Aug 21, 2010 5:20 PM
I'm interested to know how mac OSX mouse acceleration can be DISABLED or CHANGED. I'm using OSX Snow Leapord 10.6.4.

The default axis acceleration is disgusting and makes me nauseous. To be honest I can't believe such a simple thing was so badly F'd up.

Any help is appreciated =]
MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (26,935 points)
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    Aug 21, 2010 5:50 PM (in response to lomis1)
    The default axis acceleration is disgusting and makes me nauseous.


    I'm not sure what you're referring to here, nor what it is that bothers you about it. Saying that it's disgusting is perhaps the least useful descriptor you could have chosen. If you tell us what exactly your problem is with mouse movement, perhaps you may get some answers.

    To be honest I can't believe such a simple thing was so badly F'd up.


    To be honest, I can't imagine what in the world about the Mac's mouse movement bothers you so much that you'd use such strong language when talking about it. You'll find, though, that using terms like "F'd up" don't impress us here, and are not a good way to generate a positive response in an online forum.
    17" MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (73,385 points)
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    Aug 21, 2010 6:14 PM (in response to lomis1)
    System prefs > Mouse.
    Set Tracking all the way to the left.
    Then you can pick up the mouse 6 or 7 times every time you want to point it at something.
    Very convenient for keeping a mouse pad clean!
    Mac mini (mid 2010) - 2 GB RAM, Mac OS X (10.6.4), silver mini, blue mini, silver shuffle, iTunes 9.1.1 (12)
  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (73,385 points)
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    Aug 21, 2010 6:35 PM (in response to lomis1)
    Why are you trying to solicit help by attempting to be rude and offensive?
    Mac mini (mid 2010) - 2 GB RAM, Mac OS X (10.6.4), silver mini, blue mini, silver shuffle, iTunes 9.1.1 (12)
  • thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (26,935 points)
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    Aug 21, 2010 7:09 PM (in response to lomis1)
    some users may notice that when switching from long sweeping movements to short precise slow movements, the mouse reacts VERY differently.


    Long fast movements make mousey go fast! Short slow movements make mousey go slow! I see what you mean, very counter-intuitive.

    A good exercise for someone unfamiliar with what I'm talking about would be to use a mouse in MS Windows


    Yeah, I know, I hate that... mouse movement in MS Windows is so disgusting it makes me nauseous.

    Now, I could suggest some software for you that might help, but you've been rude from the start here. If you would like to ask nicely and drop the attitude, perhaps I'll be convinced to take the effort to locate that information for you. After all, you're coming here asking folks like me to take our own time to solve a problem that is not a problem, and is certainly not our problem, it's just a matter of your own personal taste.
    17" MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • BDAqua Level 10 Level 10 (114,705 points)
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    Aug 21, 2010 7:30 PM (in response to thomas_r.)
  • Richard Segedi Level 4 Level 4 (1,025 points)
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    Aug 21, 2010 7:39 PM (in response to lomis1)
    Have you by any chance inadvertently magnified the screen image? That's the only thing I can think of that might make one nauseated when trying to move the mouse around. Does the screen image move around a bit as you move the mouse? If so, hold down the Control key and then down-scroll with the mouse. The screen image should then return to normal and mouse movements will be more accurate and predictable.

    Rick
    24" Intel Core 2 duo iMac 2.8 GHz, 4GB RAM, Mac OS X (10.6.4), 4 old Macs including an original 128k Mac running System 1.1
  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (73,385 points)
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    Aug 21, 2010 8:17 PM (in response to lomis1)
    some users may notice that when switching from long sweeping movements to short precise slow movements, the mouse reacts VERY differently.

    Exactly like it's supposed to.
    When the mouse is moved quickly, the cursor accelerates more than when moved slowly.
    This allows the cursor to cover a larger screen area without having a large amount of mouse movement while still allowing the user to have precise control by using slower mouse movement.
    Works the same as WIndows.
    mouse acceleration is NOT attributed to mouse sensitivity

    and?
    Here's a blurb from the Mac OS X reference library.
    -> Mac OS X reference library - XSET(1)
    "mouse The m option controls the mouse parameters; it may be abbreviated to 'm'. The parameters for the mouse are `acceleration' and `threshold'. The acceleration can be specified as an integer, or as a simple fraction. The mouse, or whatever pointer the machine is connected to, will go `acceleration' times as fast when it travels more than `threshold' pixels in a short time. This way, the mouse can be used for precise alignment when it is moved slowly, yet it can be set to travel across the screen in a flick of the wrist when desired. One or both parameters for the m option can be omitted, but if only one is given, it will be interpreted as the acceleration. If no parameters or the flag 'default' is used, the system defaults will be set"
    Mac mini (mid 2010) - 2 GB RAM, Mac OS X (10.6.4), silver mini, blue mini, silver shuffle, iTunes 9.1.1 (12)
  • R C-R Level 6 Level 6 (13,805 points)
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    Aug 21, 2010 8:56 PM (in response to lomis1)
    lomis1 wrote:
    'Acceleration' refers to the compensation (or over-compensation) that software applies to such cursor movements whilst that cursor is in motion.

    Now that we have that part cleared up - some users may notice that when switching from long sweeping movements to short precise slow movements, the mouse reacts VERY differently.


    Acceleration is the second derivative of position; IOW, the rate of change of velocity, exactly what you see the pointer position doing as you change the velocity with which you move the mouse.

    Mouse acceleration has been a feature of the Mac interface since the beginning, long before Microsoft modeled Windows after the Mac GUI interface to the extent possible without violating Apple's patents.

    For Apple pointing products, "Tracking Speed" controls both the base (linear) sensitivity & acceleration interactively: at the lowest setting there is no acceleration but the sensitivity to mouse movement is low. Third party pointing devices may offer different options, including custom curves that allow for high sensitivity to device movements with little or no acceleration over part or all of the device velocity range. This capability is enabled by a separate driver provided with the device.
    2008 iMacs: 24"/3.06 GHz + 20"/2.66 GHz; White MacBook/2.4 GHz, Mac OS X (10.6.4), Kensington Trackball; Airport Extreme 802.11n; assorted iPods and older Macs
  • aubrey! Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Sep 25, 2010 2:00 PM (in response to lomis1)
    lomis1 -

    Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to have been any adequate response to your question, only a few judgments about your writing style. With the frustration I've experienced trying to adjust the feel of my mouse's movement, your post seems justified. I had hoped there would have been a definitive answer from some readers, as I'm experiencing the same problems as you, but there is none.

    Likewise, there is no definitive answer from Apple. I've sent written feedback twice. I've called once (the "specialist" I spoke with apologized profusely and promised to convey my feedback, but was otherwise of no help). And, now I'm posting on this forum. Maybe I should write Steve, though he is notoriously brusque in his responses.

    Here's the only solution I've been able to surmise over the past few months: There is no present solution. The acceleration curve cannot be adjusted adequately (if at all) with the latest version of OS X. No third party software helps (though MagicPrefs is really cool if you have a magic mouse, and has lots of potential!) -- I've tried them all. Looks like we'll have to wait for some Apple engineer to read this forum or notice the many people posting similar messages, often much more crudely, on other forums regarding the same issue. Maybe they'll fix it with the next OS version.
    iMac, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • R C-R Level 6 Level 6 (13,805 points)
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    Sep 25, 2010 8:48 PM (in response to aubrey!)
    It is extremely unlikely that Apple will ever remove such a fundamental & longstanding feature of the user interface -- mouse acceleration has been built into the OS for over 25 years, since long before OS X was introduced. Some form of pointer acceleration is generally considered a necessity for all modern OS's that run on large screens, since without it either pointer precision must be sacrificed or very large mouse movements are required to transverse the screen.

    Changing the acceleration curves beyond what the Apple-provided system preferences allow is a different subject. There is not a lot of demand for this but a few third party utilities, generally implemented as device drivers with their own system preference, are available. Most are bundled with third party pointing devices & only work with them. An example of this is Kensington's MouseWorks software, bundled with (& useable only with) most of its pointing devices. The software provides for separate control of low speed & high speed acceleration sensitivity. Something like this may provide what you are looking for.
    2008 iMacs: 24"/3.06 GHz + 20"/2.66 GHz; White MacBook/2.4 GHz, Mac OS X (10.6.4), Kensington Trackball; Airport Extreme 802.11n; assorted iPods and older Macs
  • aubrey! Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Oct 9, 2010 8:33 AM (in response to R C-R)
    R C -

    Agreed: there's no likelihood of removing acceleration from mice or other pointing devices, nor would I want them to. For me, it's an absolutely necessary feature. My issue, like many other mac users, is the acceleration curve chosen by Apple for their devices.

    Though using a third party driver with a third party device may be an option, I fail to understand why Apple has chosen to not allow users the ability to change the acceleration curves with Apple products. My understanding is, previous OS X versions allowed you to do so. Snow Leopard does not.

    To be more blunt, I shouldn't have to go buy another mouse when I already bought a mouse and paid a premium for the mouse I bought. For a company which prides itself on the supposed synergy of a machine and software crafted, not by two or more companies, but by one, one should wonder why another company's mouse would function better. To date: First mighty mouse with machine, failed. Second mighty mouse separately purchased is still working, but acceleration curve is abhorrent. Third purchase (thinking this may be the solution to all my problems) was a magic mouse. It's cute, has potential, especially with magic prefs, but the acceleration curve and feel of the mouse makes this an even worse experience.

    Please, Apple, provide us with the tools to modify these curves.
    iMac, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • R C-R Level 6 Level 6 (13,805 points)
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    Oct 9, 2010 3:49 PM (in response to aubrey!)
    My understanding is, previous OS X versions allowed you to do so. Snow Leopard does not.


    You are mistaken. Snow Leopard offers the same acceleration options as previous versions of OS X in the Mouse system preference. As previously explained, the basic control is labeled "Tracking speed" & adjusts the amount of acceleration & sensitivity to movement in an integrated way. Set to the slowest setting there is no acceleration & very large mouse movements result in small pointer movements on screen. Set to the fastest setting, acceleration is extreme & small mouse movements result in large pointer movements.
    2008 iMacs: 24"/3.06 GHz + 20"/2.66 GHz; White MacBook/2.4 GHz, Mac OS X (10.6.4), Kensington Trackball; Airport Extreme 802.11n; assorted iPods and older Macs
  • aubrey! Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Oct 12, 2010 4:41 PM (in response to R C-R)
    R C - R,

    I'm not mistaken. You aren't reading my statement correctly, nor understanding the angst so many Mac users experience when using Apple mice, especially when switching from PC to Mac or when gaming. It is the acceleration curve that's the issue, not the fact there is acceleration. Tracking speed settings do not adjust the curve such that it's no longer a nuisance.

    Read the article found in the link below, which provides a better explanation than I apparently provide. Finally a talented coder who is as equally frustrated (or, perhaps, just has a sympathetic ear) as me appears to be working on a solution towards which Apple has chosen not to devote resources.

    http://triq.net/articles/mouse-curve-app-mac-os-x
    iMac, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
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