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Sharp Edges on Mac Book Pro

32327 Views 64 Replies Latest reply: Dec 31, 2013 11:13 AM by seven_percent_solution RSS Branched to a new discussion.
  • entatlrg Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 2, 2010 9:30 PM (in response to robchadwick)
    I am so glad I found this thread. I'm fed up with the sharp edges on the 13, 15 and 17" MBP's. It's not necessary, it wouldn't cost Apple a penny in production to soften the edge, it's unbelievable.

    What's more unbelievable is the people who posted above saying it's not a problem and all about typing position etc. It is ignorant to say that, how can anyone dispute the sharp edges, they have no place on a consumer product.

    This is a LAPTOP not a desktop. You want to talk about ergonomics sure, let take about desks, table and chair height and you can set yourself up with an ideal typing environment.

    With a laptop you use it everywhere, that means on higher tables, lower tables, airline trays, lap in cramped quarters etc. Now, if you're at a table that is higher than it should be it's very difficult even if you hold your arms up above the keyboard in proper typing position its difficult not to have your wrist inner forearm touch or at least occasionally touch the edge. When it does it's sharp, and my right forearm is nearly rubbed raw in one spot. Why? Because for the past week I haven't been using my 15" MBP where I normally do, which is on my laptop table that is at near the perfect typing height, no or little contact with the edge.

    This past week I've been traveling again, and again sore tender wrists as a result because I used my laptop all over, higher tables, lower tables, on a deck chair and it is really frustrating the h*ll out of me.

    Tried Moshi Palmguard did't work, now I have a tea-towel with me to put over the edge when I'm in an unnatural typing position. I don't know what to do next, electrical tape or duct tape maybe, won't that look nice discussing business deals with my customers.

    There is not excuse for it, period. I'm a HUGE fan of Apple products, own my own small business, in '09 spent just short of $100,000 on Apple products, mostly notebooks and you will not find one person in our offices who doesn't agree the edges are too sharp at times uncomfortable, one person filed the edge down, looks horrible.

    So Apple, you have a real problem. I've called Customer Service, asked our Business Rep and I get the 'canned reply' .. "we've never heard of that".

    Oh I could type a novel of why sharp metal edges are bad on any notebook, and give many many valid reasons why you should offer a solution, but what good is it going to do? Likely not much.

    I'll mention one last thing, I'm such an Apple notebook fan I first started with the 15" noticed the sharp edges after a while, then bought the 13" MBP hoping since the distance from keyboard to wrist rest was less that my arm touch or rub less, that didn't work, so I went and bought the 17" hoping that since the distance from the keyboard to the edge was more that my arms would rub less, that didn't work either.

    So now I have a 13, 15 and 17" MBP all of which at times, depending if I'm using my laptop as a laptop or not will seriously irritate my forearms.

    Please help.

    Thank you.
    MBA, 13, 15, 17 MBP, Mac OS X (10.5.6)
  • tjk Level 7 Level 7 (24,130 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 2, 2010 9:41 PM (in response to entatlrg)
  • tkharris Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 8, 2010 7:24 AM (in response to mnq)
    So I've been using laptops for hours every day for about 10 years. I've never had a problem until Apple designed this razor-sharp edge. It hurts to work now, and I have nearly permanent marks on my wrist.

    Like many other people, I use my laptop everywhere: planes, temporary desks, couches, in bed, etc... I'm currently typing on a park bench because the building I have a meeting in is closed for another 15 min. The bench seat is too low and no, I don't have a book to sit on. If I had a consistent work environment where I could exercise "proper ergonomics", guess what, I'd have a desktop.

    I believe it's best to do some ethnographic research to find out how a product will be used and design accordingly. Physically injuring your customers and then telling them they aren't using-as-intended tends to sour your customers on the your product and the company behind it.
    macbook pro
  • robchadwick Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2010 5:22 PM (in response to Steve Lessard Jr)
    If Apple doesn't expect you to be able to use a laptop computer on your lap, they shouldn't refer to them as laptops:

    title of page on apple.com:
    Apple - MacBook Pro - Meet the MacBook Pro laptop family.
    www.apple.com/macbookpro/

    Using the Macbook is just plain uncomfortable. If you have excellent typing position holding your wrists up while you type, good for you; but many, if not most don't.. I doubt Apple's intent in developing a sharp-edged laptop was encouraging proper typing posture.

    Now I need a bumper for my laptop. In the grand scheme of things there are far more important things to whine about, but I shouldn't have to take a power-sander to my $2500 laptop.

    -Rob
    MacBook Pros, Mac OS X (10.6.4), Sharp Edged MacBook
  • Murat Lahur Level 3 Level 3 (690 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2010 6:02 PM (in response to robchadwick)
    Well ..
    MacBook Pro i7 15" Hi-Res, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • DM- Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2010 6:56 PM (in response to mnq)
    I don't think this is a design issue so much as a manufacturing issue. I recently went through 3 new macbook pro's before finding one without a manufacturing defect (which is a story in itself). Out of 4 total systems one had noticeably sharper edges than the others. Almost as if it was placed in the tool incorrectly. There was a small amount of excess material left on all of the edges that created a ridge which could be felt when using the computer.
    Alu Macbook Pro - 13", Mac OS X (10.5.8)
  • Jasmine Green Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 28, 2010 10:50 PM (in response to robchadwick)
    My MacBook Pro 15" with an I5 Processor has such sharp edges, that when the computer heats up, I get red gouges and scratches on my wrists.

    Please, people. Don't blame the user for using poor posture or incorrect typing style. I have had Macs since the 1980s, and this is the worst design I have seen.

    I was in an Apple store today, and the new MacBook Airs have much smoother edges, and no sharp points by in the center under the track pad.

    If it was a fantastic design, and the sharp edges were a great idea, you drank the Kool-Aid.

    Is it because Macs are on television now that you think Macs are perfect? A bad design is a bad design. Period.
    MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.4), Olympus PEN- e PL1 camera, Photoshop CS5
  • tjk Level 7 Level 7 (24,130 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 29, 2010 10:46 AM (in response to Jasmine Green)
    Jasmine Green wrote:
    Is it because Macs are on television now that you think Macs are perfect?


    I'm not sure who that's aimed at, but I don't know anyone who thinks "Macs are perfect." Regarding the "television now" comment, Macs have been on TV shows and in movies for, I'm guessing 20 years, maybe more. Sienfeld had one on his desk back somewhere around the late 80's/early 90's.

    A bad design is a bad design. Period.


    No argument there.
  • Jasmine Green Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 29, 2010 3:08 PM (in response to tjk)
    TJK,
    To clarify for you, Macs have infiltrated TV and movies like nobody's business, because of very astute ad campaigns the past 10 years or so. Since the amazing iPod campaigns.

    The comment is aimed at the people on this thread who insist that proper typing skills will eliminate the problem because it is not Apple's fault. It is Apple's fault. It's form over function, in my opinion.
    Jas
    MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.4), Olympus PEN-1 camera, Photoshop
  • tjk Level 7 Level 7 (24,130 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 29, 2010 3:20 PM (in response to Jasmine Green)
    Jasmine Green wrote:
    TJK,
    To clarify for you, Macs have infiltrated TV and movies like nobody's business, because of very astute ad campaigns the past 10 years or so. Since the amazing iPod campaigns.


    It has been at least double that amount of time, but who's counting? And in either case, I think most people would agree that neither 10 years nor 20 is "now."

    The comment is aimed at the people on this thread who insist that proper typing skills will eliminate the problem because it is not Apple's fault.


    I guess we all get to choose our own words; I can go back over the years and find plenty to "fault" Apple or probably any company for, but it this case it appears to be a design decision and/or, as someone else mentioned, a production flaw. And, like it or not, if you use proper typing skills, your wrists should not contact anything. That's a fact. Do a quick search and you'll see that.

    It's form over function, in my opinion.


    I share your opinion. That's something Apple has been known for pretty much since its beginning.
  • John P. Level 4 Level 4 (1,145 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 30, 2010 8:59 AM (in response to mnq)
    Easy fix. Return it for a refund, get another one, or get this one fixed.

    You shouldn't be getting "cuts" while using a Mac, or any other computer for that matter.
    15" Macbook Pro (Core i7), iMac 2.6Ghz, iPod Nano 5G, iPad 3G
  • Xandris Level 2 Level 2 (160 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 31, 2010 7:06 PM (in response to mnq)
    Sorry, MacBooks are not "laptops", they are Notebooks. They are not meant to be used on your lap. They are meant to be used on a hard, flat surface. If you use it on your lap, you also run the risk of burns on your legs from the heat of the computer while it is in use. But, yes, the edges are quite sharp.
    13" MacBook Pro, 4GB RAM, 80GB intel SSD, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • Jasmine Green Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 31, 2010 9:14 PM (in response to John P.)
    John P, I phoned the manager of the Apple store close to me. She was perfectly willing to take the computer back, even though I have had it for 6 months. I actually decided to keep it after some other problems I am having with it were fixed. I love the power of this computer.

    I checked out the new MacBook Air computers. The sharp points and edges are gone, even though it is a similar design. They are much smoother than the MacBook Pro. The same points are there by the trackpad, but instead of being pointy, they are rounded.

    Apple must have realized they made a faux pas, and fixed the design with the Air.
    MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.4), Olympus PEN-1 camera, Photoshop
  • John P. Level 4 Level 4 (1,145 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 31, 2010 9:21 PM (in response to Jasmine Green)
    That's good to hear. It sounds Iike what you needed was validation rather than another computer. I think that is what we all want when we have a problem--validation and action.

    Incidentally, I have not had an issue with sharp edges on my MBP, nor have I heard of anyone having this issue.
    15" Macbook Pro (Core i7), iMac 2.6Ghz, iPod Nano 5G, iPad 3G
  • sn4p2k Level 4 Level 4 (1,215 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 1, 2010 2:51 PM (in response to mnq)
    I agree they should be rounded edges whether I have bad ergonomics or not I shouldn't have to deal with this
    macbook pro 17 inch - iPhone 4, Mac OS X (10.6.1)

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