Skip navigation

1333Mhz ram in 1066 MacBook Pro

27800 Views 16 Replies Latest reply: Nov 14, 2013 6:36 AM by kreshiel RSS
1 2 Previous Next
Rick Feldkamp Calculating status...
Currently Being Moderated
Sep 18, 2011 8:24 AM

I have a MacBook pro (specs below) which specifies DDR3-1066 memory. I ordered an upgrade kit from Ramjet to go from 2GB to 8GB. Installed two 4GB modules and everything seems to be fine. However, after checking "About This Mac" I find that the installed ram is 1333, not 1066. They apparently shipped the wrong thing.

 

As I said, everything seems fine, despite warnings I've seen here. Has anyone had long-term experience with 1333 ram in a machine with a 1066 bus? Should I cross my fingers and keep going or return them and get 1066 modules?

 

Model Identifier:          MacBookPro5,1

  Processor Name:          Intel Core 2 Duo

  Processor Speed:          2.4 GHz

  Number of Processors:          1

  Total Number of Cores:          2

  L2 Cache:          3 MB

  Memory:          8 GB

  Bus Speed:          1.07 GHz

  Boot ROM Version:          MBP51.007E.B05

  SMC Version (system):          1.41f2

MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.8)
  • BobTheFisherman Level 6 Level 6 (10,580 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 18, 2011 8:29 AM (in response to Rick Feldkamp)

    The 1333 ram may or may not work. It is not working at 1333 if your computer specs are for 1066 ram. The best advice is to use only the ram specified for your computer.

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,385 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 18, 2011 5:35 PM (in response to Rick Feldkamp)

    Ram runs at the speed of the bus, unless the bus is faster than the Ram speed which is not the case here, you're fine.

  • BobTheFisherman Level 6 Level 6 (10,580 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 19, 2011 7:11 AM (in response to Rick Feldkamp)

    ?? You've now been told twice that your 1333 ram is not running at 1333. Why are you saying it "IS" working? It is is falling back to your bus speed. It is not working as designed, i.e. 1333. It may continue to fall back or one day it may just fail to work. As I previously said, you should use the ram designed for your computer.

     

    BTW and FWIW, I changed out my ram so I think I am "someone with actual experience".

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,385 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 19, 2011 8:44 AM (in response to BobTheFisherman)

    Hi Bob, just an FYI, Ram is 'backward compatible' in that it can run reliably at or at less than its maximum speed, but not at more than the maximum.

     

    I have changed Ram in many machines of many types and never found an exception to this.

  • BobTheFisherman Level 6 Level 6 (10,580 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 19, 2011 9:15 AM (in response to Csound1)

    You are correct, ram should be, usually is, backward compatible to run at slower bus speeds. But because something should be or usually is, does not convince me to not use the memory specified for my computer.

     

    I know the faster ram will run, but not at its full capability speed. My approach every time, and I've done it many times, is to use the ram specified for my computer. If the OP wants to use faster ram that is fine.

     

    Here is another thread about the topic: https://discussions.apple.com/message/15103558#15103558

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,385 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 19, 2011 2:33 PM (in response to BobTheFisherman)

    BobTheFisherman wrote:

     

    You are correct, ram should be, usually is, backward compatible to run at slower bus speeds. But because something should be or usually is, does not convince me to not use the memory specified for my computer.

     

    I know the faster ram will run, but not at its full capability speed. My approach every time, and I've done it many times, is to use the ram specified for my computer. If the OP wants to use faster ram that is fine.

     

    Here is another thread about the topic: https://discussions.apple.com/message/15103558#15103558

    Better safe than sorry

     

    Nothing wrong with that.

  • Eaglerock Calculating status...
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 14, 2012 3:02 PM (in response to BobTheFisherman)

    This may be a little late, but since I tried this just a few days ago:

     

    I had a 2GB stick of 1333 RAM lying around, so I tried upgrading my A1278 Macbook Aluminum (late 2008, 1066 RAM). It didn't work if I attempted to combine it with either of the existing 1066 sticks, in either slot: The machine wouldn't power up at all. But the system booted normally if I removed all 1066 sticks, and booted with the 1333 stick independently. All major system functions seemed to behave as normal.

     

    I suspect there's a timing issue involved with downcycling 1333 RAM to work at 1066 speeds. Maybe if the logic board is handling that issue for one stick, it can't dedicate the correct resources to the other stick. The next time I have reason to buy two 1333 SO-DIMMs, I'll try putting both in the 1066 machine and see if that works. That could be sooner rather than later, if I win an eBay auction for a 2011 MBP carcass and I'm able to get the logic board cleaned and working...

  • jincarmel Calculating status...
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 4, 2012 8:54 PM (in response to Rick Feldkamp)

    This is late. I replaced my 2gb 1066 rams with 4gb 1333 ram in late 2008 mabcook unibody. It works just fine.

    ps: the 4gb 1333 is removed from MBP early 2011, it is Sumsung.

  • Curt1591 Calculating status...
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 16, 2012 7:22 PM (in response to jincarmel)

    Assuming that you meant "Samsung", I wonder if, giving the recent lawsuits, Sumsung still sells to Apple?!

     

    One reason why an otherwise sane individual might consider using 1333 instead of 1066 is that, in some countries, 1066 is a bit hard to hunt down.

  • Daigorochan Calculating status...
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2013 9:48 PM (in response to Rick Feldkamp)

    I just got a mac mini to try and run through my macbook (have a post up looking for help with this) but without previously setting up the mini I can't vnc, remote view/control, or anything until I get access to a monitor or maybe just a keyboard... What I'm trying to get at is, the store I purchased the mini from didn't charge me for all the ram I got, I got two 4g sticks instead of 2 more 2g sticks (to match what was in the machine), thus I now have extra ram which led me to this same question/post and am feeling comfortable enough after reading this to go ahead with the 1333 install. Late '08 macbook so it's 1067 and hopefully all will go well, if not I'll be back asking, so thanks in a possible future!

  • John Galt Level 7 Level 7 (33,110 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 12, 2013 10:00 PM (in response to Eaglerock)

    Eaglerock wrote:

     

    I suspect there's a timing issue involved with downcycling 1333 RAM to work at 1066 speeds.

     

    The Mac's bus speed is fixed. No "downcycling" is possible.

     

    Use correct memory. Anything else is incorrect.

  • exergy2 Calculating status...
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 23, 2013 4:49 PM (in response to Rick Feldkamp)

    I ran 2x4GB Samsung 2RX8 PC3-10600S DDR3 SODIM (1333 MHz) ram on my mid 2009 MBP for 2 years. I bought it and had it installed at a small computer shop before I'd ever looked into anything about ram.

     

    The computer ran very well (night and day compared to the 2GB I bought it with). I used office applications in both OSX and Windows (bootcamp), but mainly ran in Windows for my work. Nothing graphics intensive, except maybe google earth...

     

    In late 2011, I downloaded a google earth upgrade. The new google earth looked more fancy, but would crash after about 20 seconds every time I opened it. I stopped using google earth.

     

    I recently cleared my drive (incidental), installed Snow Leopard from scratch, and found that google earth was still unusable. I recently swapped the Samsung ram with two 4GB 1066 Kingston chips, "Specific Memory for Apple (KTA-MB1066K2/8G)".  I'd researched and purchased the chips (after my upgrade) for my wife's Macbook, and she now has a new computer.  Google earth now works great.

     

    Now that I know, I wouldn never buy overclocked ram again.  However if I had 8GB of 1333 lying around and only 2GB of 1066 in my 2009 MBP, I would certainly run the overclocked 8GB and deal with the occasional bugs.

1 2 Previous Next

Actions

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Legend

  • This solved my question - 10 points
  • This helped me - 5 points
This site contains user submitted content, comments and opinions and is for informational purposes only. Apple disclaims any and all liability for the acts, omissions and conduct of any third parties in connection with or related to your use of the site. All postings and use of the content on this site are subject to the Apple Support Communities Terms of Use.