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fast switching problem

907 Views 13 Replies Latest reply: May 21, 2012 10:25 AM by slolifesux RSS
tarik2012 Calculating status...
Currently Being Moderated
Oct 1, 2011 10:20 PM

I used fast swtiching on 2010 iMac between root account and my main account. The iMac does not allow me to logout from my root account. Has anyone seen this problem.

iMac, Mac OS X (10.7.1)
  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (107,985 points)
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    Oct 1, 2011 10:28 PM (in response to tarik2012)

    Has anyone seen this problem.

     

    Probably not, because almost no one logs in as root, or has any reason to. It's one of the best ways to destroy your system.

  • softwater Level 5 Level 5 (5,370 points)
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    Oct 1, 2011 11:32 PM (in response to tarik2012)

    Try disabling root user first, then logging out, logging back in, enabling root user again.

     

    If it doesnt' work let me know - Lion may not allow fast user switching for root (that wouldn't surprise me) - and I'll try it on my Lion test install (currently in SL so can't tell you).

  • Chip Old Level 1 Level 1 (110 points)
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    Oct 2, 2011 9:59 AM (in response to tarik2012)

    If it's any consolation (probably not), I was able to replicate the problem on all five Lion machines here:

     

    • Fast switched from user account to root account.
    • Tried to log out of root account, but couldn't.
    • Fast switched back to user account.
    • Found the "Are you sure you want to log out" dialog box on the user account's Desktop!
    • Clicked "Yes".
    • User account was logged out, not root.
    • Back in the root account.
    • Tried to log out, but couldn't.
    • Tried to restart, but couldn't.
    • Tried to shut down, but couldn't.
    • Selected "Show login window" from the fast switch menu.
    • Clicked Restart button in the login window.
    • Success!

     

    Bizarre!

     

    When I work as root I do it via su (or more safely, sudo) in a Terminal window. The last time I tried fast switching to root was probably several major OSX versions ago. I don't remember this strange behavior in whatever OSX version I was using  back then.

    Multiple Macs, Mac OS X (10.7.1), iPhone 4, iPad 2, iPod 5G
  • steve359 Level 6 Level 6 (12,035 points)
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    Oct 2, 2011 3:38 PM (in response to tarik2012)

    I manage Linux systems at at home, and use UNIX systems at work.

     

    For home systems I use the root account to get the system initially set up, then switch to a less-capable account for almost everything else.

     

    At work if you make a joke about getting "root password" from the system administrator, be sure you know them well enough and that they understand you are *just joking*.

     

    I am not trying to be overly dramatic, just factual.

  • steve359 Level 6 Level 6 (12,035 points)
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    Oct 2, 2011 3:57 PM (in response to tarik2012)

    If you have a spare/old desktop, you can download ubuntu and run your own little system.

     

    You will learn much about

     

    • Networking (hosts file, netconfig)
    • File/directory permissions, which will provide much insight into future issues you will have with application/file sharing even between uses on the same Mac
    • Utilities such as tar/zip

     

    I think ds store runs a Linux separate from his Macs, and that is why he knows so much and is relatively fearless in learning new things.

     

    Besides, it lets you make mistakes in a system you can afford to screw up.

     

    Eventually you can even make a database or file server that lives behind a firewall and can hold files you can reach anything wherever you are through the internet.

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,305 points)
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    Oct 2, 2011 10:52 PM (in response to Chip Old)

    Chip Old wrote:

     

    Bizarre!

     

    Well if you mange to lock yourself out

     

    1: command r boot

     

    2: terminal: reset password.

     

     

    Did Cupertino farm out all it's brains to the country of Shiffer?

  • Chip Old Level 1 Level 1 (110 points)
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    Oct 3, 2011 5:48 AM (in response to ds store)

    ds store wrote:

     

    Well if you mange to lock yourself out

     

    1: command r boot

     

    2: terminal: reset password.

     

    No worries about locking myself out. If all else fails I can always ssh into it from one of my other Macs or my Linux machine and reboot from the command line. It's just annoying that fast switching to root under Lion behaves this way. I've submitted it as a bug report, and it will help if others do too:

     

    http://www.apple.com/feedback/macosx.html

     

    Did Cupertino farm out all it's brains to the country of Shiffer?

     

    Sorry, you lost me there, although if you mean Claudia Shiffer it might be worth the trip to find out...

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,305 points)
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    Oct 5, 2011 6:12 PM (in response to Chip Old)

    Chip Old wrote:

     

    I've submitted it as a bug report

     

    I posted your findings in the Lounge which gets a little more attention.

  • slolifesux Calculating status...
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 21, 2012 10:25 AM (in response to Linc Davis)

    How is that an answer?  Saying don't go there, dragons, doesn't fix the problem.  Problem still exists, needs to be fixed and who knows what issues are related that can harm the system even without a user ever entering the root account  That's a lazy, Nick Burns attitude.

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