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ColorSync or other to reduce pdf size

6595 Views 35 Replies Latest reply: Oct 6, 2012 9:39 AM by laurafrommedford RSS
  • hotwheels 22 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Oct 10, 2011 6:01 PM (in response to jsd2)

    OK. Just so I know where I am headed with this. I got the First one going that gives me the options for Saving out of Preview.

     

    This is the folder that I can drag and drop pdf's (which would be very useful):

     

    > Take a look at the first post in this long thread:

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/1292868

     

    And this is for PRINTING to pdf's (as opposed to saving or changing):

     

    > Here's a further project for you!

    How to automate application of quartz filter to scanner output?

    (see the 10/8/11 post)

     

    Thanks and hope New England is doing well since the last time I was there...

  • jsd2 Level 5 Level 5 (6,200 points)
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    Oct 10, 2011 6:32 PM (in response to hotwheels 22)

    hotwheels 22 wrote:

     

    OK. Just so I know where I am headed with this. I got the First one going that gives me the options for Saving out of Preview.

     

    This is the folder that I can drag and drop pdf's (which would be very useful):

     

    > Take a look at the first post in this long thread:

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/1292868

     

    And this is for PRINTING to pdf's (as opposed to saving or changing):

     

    > Here's a further project for you!

    How to automate application of quartz filter to scanner output?

    (see the 10/8/11 post)

     

    Thanks and hope New England is doing well since the last time I was there...

     

    We don't sem to be on the same page yet-

     

    ------------------------

    > Take a look at the first post in this long thread:

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/1292868

     

    The above link gives a download location for the filters created by the OP there, and an explanation of where to put them so that they will appear in Preview's Save dialog.

    -------------------

    .

     

    --------------------------

    >Here's a further project for you!

    How to automate application of quartz filter to scanner output?

    (see the 10/8/11 post)

     

    The above link shows how to create a drag and drop folder for PDF file compression.

    -----------------

     

    I did not give any link regarding printing, nor do I know of any, as I had said.

     

    New England is still recovering from the Red Sox, but otherwise seems to be doing OK....

  • hotwheels 22 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Oct 10, 2011 7:25 PM (in response to jsd2)

    Thanks. I'll take another look at this and move it forward a bit. It would be great to be able to print out with some control over pdf size but I have yet to see this.

     

    Yeah, Sox were like pulling off a band-aid that had to come off. Do it quick and get it over with.

     

    Francona has a future in broadcasting though. He's pretty good.

  • hotwheels 22 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Nov 9, 2011 1:54 PM (in response to Kurt Lang)

    hi Kurt.


    Are you still on this thread?

     

    I'm new to mac and this is leaving scars at this point.

     

    I have all kinds of pdf's (scans of images, scans of primarily text, prints to pdf of all kinds of things, pdf's that are downloaded from the net etc).

     

    Is there a way to figure out how to "down sample" some of these or what I should expect to downsample or even to understand this better?

     

    I am trying to get a document of 33 scans out to someone and it is getting kicked back - and I am a year and a half into my move to mac and I still haven't solved this...

     

    Can you advise?

     

    THanks,

     

    Jon

  • hotwheels 22 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Nov 9, 2011 2:01 PM (in response to jsd2)

    jsd2,

     

    Are you still on this one? Can you help me out please?

     

    I feel like I am doing a thesis here and I can't seem to make this work.

     

    I have the filters installed which give the pulldown options but when I go to the Standard Compression one (150 dpi) my 33 page scan of some images is still 60 MB and too large to email.

     

    Also, I was not able to get the drag and drop folder functionality working despite wanting to do this very much.

     

    Can you drop me some pointers here I have gotten a bit lost between my text pdf's and image pdf's and I've never used Automator before etcetera.

     

    I've got about 50 GB on my hard drive filled up with pdf's and I can't get anything out via email. :  (

     

    - Jon

  • Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,540 points)
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    Nov 9, 2011 2:10 PM (in response to hotwheels 22)

    It can be done from the Mac without any extra software, but the results are tragically bad. Open any PDF in Preview. Do a Save As. Select PDF as the output type, and Reduce File Size under the Quartz filter.

     

    This applies the only settings OS X uses to save PDF files containing raster images. They are knocked down to 72 dpi as a highly compressed JPEG (reduction favored over quality). I did a test of a fairly small RGB file at 300 dpi, 4.9 MB in size. Saved it as a PDF (which means the TIFF just gets placed inside a PDF wrapper as is). I then opened that in Preview and did the steps above. The resulting PDF is only 49 KB in size, and looks like it.

  • hotwheels 22 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Nov 9, 2011 2:32 PM (in response to Kurt Lang)

    Hi Kurt.

     

    Thanks.

     

    I already got bit by this rather hard.

     

    I have some filters installed in Preview that give me some options:

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/1292868?start=0&tstart=0 (first post) 

     

    And I am trying to get this automated routine installed here:

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3058047?start=0&tstart=0 (third post)

     

    But in the first case I am trying to downsize a 66 MB file that has 33 images that I scanned from my scanner to png (I believe) and I am selecting SaveAs and running the 150 dpi setting and it stays at 66 MB. This is too big to email.

     

    On the second one I am getting tripped up in Automator. Is there some need in Automator to actually run the script before saving it? He seems to indicate:

    1. Open Automator

    2. Click on the Folder icon (I think)

    3. Drag and drop Apply Quartz Filter To Pdf Document

    4. Click "Don't Add"

    5. Select the type of filter you want on the scrolldown on left (dpi amount)

    6. Hit the scrolldown on the top right and go to "Other" and select a folder on your desktop.

    7. Run File > SaveAs

     

    Does anyone know if this looks right? Should a file arrive in the folder? Do I drag and drop a pdf to the /folder/ and it downsamples the pdf in place?

     

    ALSO, is there a reason I would get a scanned document of a text to downsize and not get a scanned document of images to downsize using these filters? You made a point earlier about the images not getting downsampled within the pdf and I am totally lost with this as much as I need to understand it.

     

    I mean, I open Preview, I print to pdf and I fill up my hard drive with 800 and 900 MB sized pdf's...which I now have to downsize to even think about working with...

     

    Thanks!!

  • Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,540 points)
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    Nov 10, 2011 7:41 AM (in response to hotwheels 22)

    I would start here. Since everything you appear to be doing is scanned images, there's zero advantage to making them PDFs.  You're just enclosing one file type in another. It also makes it much harder to manipulate their size. Well, there is one advantage. You can send "one" file to wherever it's going instead of 33 (as per your example). Other than that, you're just making it much more difficult to change their sizes.

     

    If printed output is the intent of these images, 150 dpi is actually too low. 300 dpi is the industry standard. Lower resolution images only work if they're being printed smaller than their actual size. As an example, you could have an image at 150 dpi, but placed into Quark or InDesign at 65% of size. So the effective output resolution for that image is 231 dpi. Still a bit low, but better than 150 dpi.

     

    I don't know nothin' 'bout usin' no Automator, so I can't help you there.

     

    Your best bet would be to open the PDF images in Photoshop (I'm presuming you have this). When the dialogue box comes up, set the dpi to what you know the images are in the PDF so they match. Set the color space to match. Turn off anti-alias in this case. You don't want the images smoothed as you've already set the dpi to match the original, so there's nothing to smooth. They'll open 1:1. It will ask which "page" you'd like to open. Mark all of them so they open as individual images (click on the first one, and Shift click on the last). Lastly, set the "Crop to" as Bounding Box.

     

    Once they're all open in PS, save them all out as individual TIFFs. It's a bit of work to get to this point, but now they'll be far easier to manipulate.

     

    Open any image and create a new Action to do whatever you want to it. Stop the action after you've done all of your steps, including a Save As to a JPEG, PNG, or whatever format you want the file to have in the end. Now you have an Action you can run from batch mode within PS on all of your images. Create as many actions as you want. Different dpi settings, file type, etc.

     

    Overall, you're still going to have a lot of data to send. You can only reduce a file so far before it becomes unusable for print. You're going to have to look into something other then email to get the images to your client.

  • hotwheels 22 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Nov 10, 2011 11:57 AM (in response to Kurt Lang)

    Hi Kurt.

     

    Thanks so much. Also, thanks a ton for the heads up on keeping the 300 dpi setting!

     

    I am going to print this out and study it. I have a very old version of Photoshop on my Windows Virtual Machine and I have a very old version of Elements 3. I've been using Preview because it is really handy but there are some bizarre and unhelpful things. Printing to pdf is just nuts. I can't think of a good reason why the pdf's are so huge. Also, the whole point of pdf is to have a convenient document so people can open it and see the data and not have a bunch of images scattered all over the place.

     

    Did Mac and Adobe get into a war and Adobe won't supply Apple with anything so Apple can see how hard it is to generate and/or downsize pdf's? I'm getting killed by this. Let's see -

     

    "Your best bet would be to open the PDF images in Photoshop (I'm presuming you have this). When the dialogue box comes up, set the dpi to what you know the images are in the PDF so they match. Set the color space to match. Turn off anti-alias in this case. You don't want the images smoothed as you've already set the dpi to match the original, so there's nothing to smooth. They'll open 1:1. It will ask which "page" you'd like to open. Mark all of them so they open as individual images (click on the first one, and Shift click on the last). Lastly, set the "Crop to" as Bounding Box.

     

    Once they're all open in PS, save them all out as individual TIFFs. It's a bit of work to get to this point, but now they'll be far easier to manipulate."

     

    OK, so this is an end run around downsizing the actual pdf's and it will get me my documents back to all individual TIFF's at some lower resolution than the (I assume) original 300 dpi? I mean, after scanning - I have not really kept the original images because the whole point of printing to pdf is so I don't have to deal with individual image files...

     

    Again a big thank you.

     

    - Jon

  • Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,540 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 10, 2011 12:27 PM (in response to hotwheels 22)
    I can't think of a good reason why the pdf's are so huge.

    I can only guess, but I would imagine your thinking is the general assumption that "PDFs are small". Well, no, not necessarily. It depends on what's in them. PDF is a container with the ability to preserve the layout of the source program (Word, Pages, InDesign, etc.). But if your source file is big (say a 10 MB TIFF), and it goes directly into a PDF as is (such as it sounds like your scanner software allows you to do), then it's still going to be a 10 MB PDF, plus a bit more for the TIFF being within yet another document type.

    Also, the whole point of pdf is to have a convenient document so people can open it and see the data ...

    Anyone can open JPEGs. Though you have to watch how you save those so you don't destroy the image quality. The only setting for that is to use Maximum Quality. In Photoshop, that's setting the number to 12. You have to go out of your way to find pixels that are different in a level 12 JPEG as opposed to an uncompressed TIFF. But then, a level 12 JPEG isn't going to be a whole lot smaller than a TIFF.

    ... and not have a bunch of images scattered all over the place.

    I very much do not want to tell you how to do your work, but I'd rather have the much more easily manipulated individual scans, then having them stuffed into a very difficult to manipulate PDF container. You can always create folders to put the individual scans in so they are separated from each other. Then you're basically duplicating the same system as putting them by group into a PDF. With the individual scans, you can also then .zip a few of them together at a time so you can get by your email size limit.

    Did Mac and Adobe get into a war and Adobe won't supply Apple with anything so Apple can see how hard it is to generate and/or downsize pdf's?

    I doubt it. Adobe from the beginning made PDF an open format. I suppose it's possible though that Apple would have to pay Adobe a very large licensing fee to have the OS handle raster images the same way Acrobat Pro does. Otherwise, who would bother to buy Acrobat Pro from Adobe? The only app I know of with much of the same built in ability as Acrobat Pro is Quark XPress. And the only reason I think they did that is you can't print out of Quark directly to Acrobat Pro. Not and get the correct document size anyway. It only works correctly in Quark to use the built in PDF output generator. The only other way around that in Quark is to output your pages as PostScript data. Then drop the .ps file into the Acrobat Distiller.

    OK, so this is an end run around downsizing the actual pdf's and it will get me my documents back to all individual TIFF's at some lower resolution than the (I assume) original 300 dpi?

    Yes, because it's basically impossible, or at least very difficult to do when they're embedded in a PDF file.

    I mean, after scanning - I have not really kept the original images because the whole point of printing to pdf is so I don't have to deal with individual image files...

    As mentioned, it's up to you how you want to manage your files, but you're really just making your scans way more difficult to manipulate for a rather limited "advantage".

  • hotwheels 22 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 11, 2011 3:17 PM (in response to Kurt Lang)

    Hi Kurt.

     

    OK. Thanks.

     

    I think for my workflow it is really important for me to have a single unified format such as pdf. It is very difficult for me to keep all these images individually and if I am sending them out in a professional presentation I have to use pdf. It is too inconvenient to send or receive individual images IMHO or at least in my workflow.

     

    Can I please ask you about the image sizes though? I have spoken with others that are telling me that I do in fact need 300 dpi for my scans in case i need to go to print in some way (which I may need to do). I realize that 72 dpi is sufficient for web work and I do downsize before posting to the web, however - can you help me with why my SCANNED TIFF's are 10 MB and my screenshots in png format are only 172 KB? I mean, I see now that you point it out that my  8 1/2 x 11 screenshots are 72 dpi and only 150 KB plus or minus but my SCREENSHOTS (?!) from my HP device are 8 1/2 x 11 png and they say they are now "26.7 MB (was 7.2 MB)". Under "size" in Finder this image says it is 7.2 MB but Preview is telling me under Tools > Adjust Size that it "was" 7.2 WHICH IS HUGE but it is now 27 MB which is flat out bonkers. It is a /single/ scan.

     

    I mean, I guess I have to try a png scan from the scanner and compare it to a TIFF scan from the scanner and a JPG scan and see what the three look like? Then I have to downsize my scans to 150 dpi - and EVEN THEN I have to Print to pdf and find a ColorSync profile which will downsize the pdf even further?

     

    I mean, I guess I don't get why this is dumb and easy. I have Print Screen that are totally legible and totally reasonable in size - but when I try to downsize a pdf I either have to go with a manageable size that I can't see or I have to go with huge pdf's that are in the 50 MB range?

     

    Something seems wrong somewhere and while I am tempted to blame the TIFFS my scanner is producing I also have this problem with images off the net that I put together to make a pdf.

     

    Seems like something is off with macs production and downsizing of pdfs and I'd love a way to manage this that doesn't require spending 600 US on Acrobat.

     

    Am I missing something? I just need pdf's that don't take up 100 GB on my hard drive and which people can read...

     

    Thanks!

     

    Jon

  • Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,540 points)
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    Nov 12, 2011 6:25 AM (in response to hotwheels 22)

    A curiosity question to start with. Are you the same person who started this thread? You user name in the later posts is hotwheels 22, but the initial post was made by Hotwheels22. I am assuming both are yourself, and you forgot your login password for the initial ID and had to create a new one? No big deal, just wondering.

    I have spoken with others that are telling me that I do in fact need 300 dpi for my scans in case i need to go to print in some way (which I may need to do).

    Yup. About 25 years in prepress for me. 300 dpi is normal for most work. Higher resolutions are sometimes used, depending on the printing process, and at other times, the image itself. It would require a lot of space to explain that seemingly simple sentence, so I'm going to skip it.

     

    Mind you, that means 300 dpi at print size. When you look at things like a Nikon CoolScan, it scans 35mm negs at something like 2000 dpi. That sounds like a lot, but really isn't, because it's scanning the neg at 100% of its size. So you end up with a 1.25" x 1.8" image at 2000 dpi. But who's ever going to print the image at that size? So you reset (not scale) the res to 300 dpi, and now it's an 8.25" x 12" image. All of that "extra" dpi is there so you have enough pixel data to print at larger sizes.

    I realize that 72 dpi is sufficient for web work and I do downsize before posting to the web

    Yes, since it only has to look good on screen. And when it comes to that, what dpi the file is set to makes no difference at all. The only thing the web cares about is pixel dimensions. If your image is 300 x 500 pixels, it doesn't matter in the least if the dpi is 5, 72, 300 or any other number you want use, it will display the same size on screen since the browser only cares about the 300 x 500 pixel size. Video also only goes by pixel dimensions. Resolution means nothing.

    but my SCREENSHOTS (?!) from my HP device are 8 1/2 x 11 png and they say they are now "26.7 MB (was 7.2 MB)". Under "size" in Finder this image says it is 7.2 MB but Preview is telling me under Tools > Adjust Size that it "was" 7.2 WHICH IS HUGE but it is now 27 MB which is flat out bonkers.

    I have to guess a bit. A .png file is a lossless compressed format. So a file that is 7.2 MB as a .png could very well be 27 MB as an uncompressed TIFF. Which to me, is not a huge file at all, just average. You want big? I recently scanned a semi-pro photographer's negs as 300 dpi RGB files at 30" x 60". Size of those as an uncompressed TIFF is 520 MB.

    and EVEN THEN I have to Print to pdf and find a ColorSync profile which will downsize the pdf even further?

    ColorSync profiles have nothing to do with size. A profile is a description of a color space.

    Something seems wrong somewhere and while I am tempted to blame the TIFFS my scanner is producing I also have this problem with images off the net that I put together to make a pdf.

    Nothing wrong with the scanner. Print resolution images are big. Way bigger than the teeny images people are used to grabbing from Google Images, or just dragging an image from a web page to their desktop. Here's some uncompressed sizes in RGB for comparison:

     

    4x6 inches - 6.2 MB

    5x7 inches - 9 MB

    8x10 inches - 20.6 MB

    16x20 inches - 82.4 MB

     

    If that's typical to the size of your scans at the same resolution and size (and they should be), then nothing's wrong.

    Seems like something is off with macs production and downsizing of pdfs

    Nothing "off", just extremely limited built in ability.

    Am I missing something? I just need pdf's that don't take up 100 GB on my hard drive and which people can read...

    Nope, not missing anything as I read it. Print size is big, screen size is small. You can't have both in the one image.

  • hotwheels 22 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 12, 2011 8:03 AM (in response to Kurt Lang)

    Hi Kurt.

     

    Thank you. I'm very grateful for your help. Also for the others that have tried to help me straighten this out.

     

    I have to study your answer regarding the numbers a little closer. I have taken a look at this previously but since I am not in print or 2d digital media I have not have a reason to study it except to think that TIFF is a lossless format (good for me I think) and that png is a good format for the web. Also, I know that the size of the image basically goes up exponentially when you increase resolution or the actual size of the image but to be honest this is really where my understandin stops. But this thing about not being able to email pdf's is a problem for me that I have only run into since moving to Mac.

     

    Can I ask you what /resolution/ the image sizes you show have? I mean, I sort of get that you are saying these are RGB image (as opposed to CMYK I guess which is used for offset among other things?) but are the sizes what I should expect to see if I scanned an image of that size on my scanner at 300 dpi or if I took a photo at 300 dpi and made it that size somehow? From what I can see if I take a screenshot at that size it will be 72 dpi which of course would have another set of file sizes associated with the image sizes you show.

     

    Am I correct in hearing that I need to downsample my images before I gather them up in Preview and print to pdf and that I can basically expect a 1:1 (or something similar) file size so that if I have 4 images that are 4 MB each I will end up with a 16 MB pdf?

     

    Lastly, the alternative to this is to just grab the images as they are in Preview, print to pdf and then open them again in Preview and using a filter Save over the large file size, yes? Is there a chance you have heard of a bug in Preview where opening some pdf's (after they have been saved out with a filter??) inverts the color of your images in some way that opening in Acrobat doesn't? I mean, I am being told that the images that I downsampled using a ColorSync profile are inverted to all green color because I opened them in Preview to see them and that they are now permanently corrupted because I likely then saved them in Preview? I mean, I was moving happily along downsizing my pdfs and then I took a look at one and it had all green images...

     

    - Jon

     

    P.S. I have to take a look at that login name thing. They are both mine but I don't quite understand why there are two. That said, I am having a problem with not having Aperture show up as a purchase of mine and perhaps this is the reason? You are saying you see two Apple Forum names here for my posts? Do you happen to know if these translate in any way to mac App Store or Mac Store in any way?! It's a little bizarre and I have to look into it...

  • Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,540 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 12, 2011 12:46 PM (in response to hotwheels 22)
    I have not have a reason to study it except to think that TIFF is a lossless format (good for me I think) and that png is a good format for the web.

    TIFF can be lossy, though that's a somewhat recent change. When you save a TIFF out of Photoshop, you have a few choices; NONE, LZW, ZIP, JPEG.

     

    TIFF, by the way, stands for Tagged Image File Format. For those who know how to save files in this format, you can embed all kinds of information into your images, not just the image data itself. This is how LZW, Zip and JPEG compression can be applied to a TIFF. Part of the tagged data tells the program reading the TIFF if it's been compressed, and in what manner, so it can open the image correctly.

     

    None is of course just what it says. The file is saved straight up.

     

    LZW is a lossless compressions scheme (created by Abraham Lempel, Jacob Ziv, and Terry Welch). The file is compressed with zero loss of pixel integrity. A decompressed file will be 100% identical to the uncompressed image it started from. You can apply this scheme endlessly to the same image and never affect it.

     

    Zip is also lossless. The same compression scheme used for years beginning on PC's in MS-DOS (created by Phil Katz, which is why it was originally known as PKZip). When you right click on a file in OS X and choose "Compress xxx Items", it is saved in the Zip format. Like LZW, it can be applied and decompressed over and over without altering even one pixel.

     

    JPEG is, as I'm sure you know, a lossy format. So if you choose that compression in a TIFF, it will be ruined the same way a .jpg file would. Saves space, degrades the image.

    Also, I know that the size of the image basically goes up exponentially when you increase resolution or the actual size of the image but to be honest this is really where my understanding stops.

    You have to remember that as you go up, you are adding pixels in the height and width. So a 6"x6" 300 dpi file isn't twice as large as a 3"x3" 300 dpi file, it's four times larger.

    But this thing about not being able to email pdf's is a problem for me that I have only run into since moving to Mac.

    Not a Mac issue. Whatever you were doing to save your scans as PDF under Windows was very likely saving them with fairly high JPEG compression. You just didn't know it.

    I mean, I sort of get that you are saying these are RGB image (as opposed to CMYK I guess which is used for offset among other things?) but are the sizes what I should expect to see if I scanned an image of that size on my scanner at 300 dpi or if I took a photo at 300 dpi and made it that size somehow?

    At least 95% of the work I do is CMYK. I usually use RGB as examples since that's what most people use outside of the printing industry. As far as a scan vs. a digital camera shot? No difference. An 8"x10" 300 dpi, 8 bit RGB file will take up exactly the same amount of space, assuming neither is compressed.

    From what I can see if I take a screenshot at that size it will be 72 dpi which of course would have another set of file sizes associated with the image sizes you show.

    It's only 72 dpi because the OS automatically sets it to that res. But resolution, no matter what created the raster image, only makes a difference to your output device. And that would be a printer, RIP, film output or DTP (Direct To Plate). The image's resolution tells the device how many of the pixels should be used in one linear inch, height and width. On screen, it makes no difference. The monitor determines its own resolution and just displays the pixels 1:1 (at full size).

    Am I correct in hearing that I need to downsample my images before I gather them up in Preview and print to pdf and that I can basically expect a 1:1 (or something similar) file size so that if I have 4 images that are 4 MB each I will end up with a 16 MB pdf?

    Not sure since I never use Preview to edit anything. That's what Photoshop is for. Preview is a very poor replacement for any program intended for image editing. Per your next paragraph, Preview itself is your problem. It will only apply one kind of compression to your embedded scans in a PDF; and that's as a very highly compressed JPEG. If you do that, you may as well delete your files. They aren't even good enough for viewing on a monitor after that. Not sure what's going on with the green issue.

     

    I know you don't want to hear this, but your workflow of embedding raster scans into a PDF file is your major blockade here. It's a very bad way to manage image files. I strongly suggest you forgo using PDF and save your images as what they are; TIFFs. PDF is just making your ability to change your image sizes nearly impossible.

    P.S. I have to take a look at that login name thing. They are both mine but I don't quite understand why there are two.

    The only reason I can think of is that you have two different email addresses being used at Apple. So each has its own login. You'll have to remember which one was used to start this thread.

  • Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,540 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 13, 2011 10:37 AM (in response to Kurt Lang)

    Just an extra note. I played with Preview a bit and was able to duplicate the "green" issue. It appears to be a bug in Preview when you try to save any CMYK image to a PDF. And then only when you choose the option to reduce the size. Doesn't happen with RGB images.

     

    If you really want to stick with PDF, there's a tutorial here to change how OS X reduces the size. You create your own setting (in ColorSync of all places). I created a new setting and named it "JPEG quality", the only option I added to it was JPEG compression at maximum quality. Now I can choose that in Preview and applied it to an RGB, 5.2 MB TIFF. The resulting PDF was 1.7 MB in size with a still decent looking image. The problem with CMYK still exists, and it turns green.

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