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Apple Cinema Display 23" - Blank Screen, "short-long-short" LED code

189934 Views 344 Replies Latest reply: Apr 1, 2014 11:36 AM by hncl RSS
  • Drew Reece (Re:co) Level 2 Level 2 (310 points)

    treehousedaddy wrote:

     

    Ouch! Do you work for Apple, Drew? 

     

    Nope, I don't work for Apple.

     

     

    So you're right, my figure of thousands is a "made up fact" but such was ever thus when it comes to estimating numbers. If you have precise figures, pray share them and explain how you got them.

     

     

    I don't have figures, I'm not the one speculating thousands have had this issue.

     

    Now I'm curious to know how you're so confident it's the display and not the block? I happen to have two displays, and therefore two blocks. If I swap them, as I did again between writing the first and second paragraph here just to check, I find that WOW! the display you adamantly pronounce broken works just fine. And the display that worked brillianto just a moment ago is as dead as the other was. Ergo, it's the block.

    You are probably correct in your case, you don't mention the error code that the power light shows with this issue so perhaps you are seeing something different? You also didn't mention the test with the 2 displays & 2 power bricks in the first post. It does sound different since your display flickers with 'pin block hack', but that could be due to a short on the other pins.

     

    I say it is the display that has failed because I have diagnosed one with the 'short-long-short' error. Many others have said the 'pin block hack' works, which also worked for the display I was working on. The 150W supply didn't work. Others have also noted that switching between 2 supplies makes the display work (for a limited period), then switching again 'fixes' the issue.

     

    Applying some google fu & some testing I came to the following conclusions…

    If the 'pin block hack' makes a display work it suggests that the power supply is able to provide sufficient voltage & current to run the display. Otherwise the PSU protection circuits would shut it down.

    The center pin is used to identify the type of power supply, if you remove the center pin connection the display reads that as the correct type of supply & activates the inverter board inside the display. It seems to be related to the 1117 voltage regulator that A1082 also replaced.

    The display can behave wierdly with different supplies but as far as I can tell the issue is inside the display, but PSU's do fail too. Since the PSU pins are tiny it is easier to open up the display & test the vlotage on the main board provided you know what you are doing with a voltage meter & screw driver etc.

     

    I don't have an axe to grind with you & suggesting what Apple should do rarely works in my experience -> http://pixelchimp.net/mac-death :^)

     

    Last I saw the supplies were going for £125 on Amazon.

     

    I wish Apple could fix every failed product, but it seems like a lot of people expect fixes beyond 3 years even when they have not purchased Apple Care, see my deadmac raw data for an idea. I do wish they would release more technical info to allow people to fix their own equipment, but asking Apple to do so for free many years after purchase seems unfair, unless a product recall was issued.

  • treehousedaddy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I wish Apple could fix every failed product, but it seems like a lot of people expect fixes beyond 3 years even when they have not purchased Apple Care

    My first Mac was a IIe in 1986 and I've had them ever since. Apart from two G3 laptops in a row that were DOA and this monitor (which I bought second hand), the rest have all been brilliant and lasted me as much as 10 years. So I feel reasonably qualified to say this is a manufacturing fail on their part. As my other 23" monitor is coming up to 6 years old and looks as beautiful and reliable as the day I got it I suspect they had a batch of power blocks that were badly put together - which brings me back to the simple idea that Apple could just 'fess up and sort it for those of us who got a duffer.

  • Drew Reece (Re:co) Level 2 Level 2 (310 points)

    Take it to the small claims court, or speak to trading standards.

    There are laws in the UK for products that break or are otherwise 'unfit for purpose'. I suspect you will have a hard time proving the issue is Apple's fault for such an old product that was already second hand when you got it.

  • 2W Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hi Matimac,

     

    It worked. Thanks. Btw: it is easier to roll up a small piece of paper, make a V shape out of it and put it in the outlet instead of trying to put in on the plug.

  • Peter VE Calculating status...

    My 20" CInema Display just succumbed to the epidemic.  Its also long out of warranty (bought February, 2008).  Good thing I have an 8 year old Sony brand monitor also hooked up....Maybe I'll have to lug the 12 yo 19" Trinitron CRT Monitor down here, and buy a new LCD for my wife ;-).  I unplugged the connection from my 65W brick, and it's a different connection than shown on the You Tube video.  I'll try to futz with plastic blocks on the center section...

  • louis1946 Calculating status...

    A sixteenth-inch wide ribbon of electrical tape over the center contact on the power connector instantly restored my 23" Cinema Display to life, and I've never looked back.

  • treehousedaddy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Further evidence that the power blocks supplied with the 23" display might have been defective: a reconditioned 150W block arrived yesterday, bought off eBay. Plugged it in, display now works perfectly. As posted previously, I think QC failed on a batch and a recall/replace — at the time the fault became apparent — would have been the correct response.

  • Peter VE Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I went the 1/16th " wide electrical tape ribbon route, on the center contact of the outlet of the power block.  It took a little bit of fiddling with the tweezerrs, and VICTORY!   My 20" display is back to life.  I was all set to order a Viewsonic monitor - sorry until next time.

  • Scott Myhre Calculating status...

    I ran across the solution originally proposed by Jakobeon.

    Covering the middle pin of the power connector which plugs into the power brick from the monitor.  Evidently this is a grounding pin.

    Illustrated on YouTube...(I found paper easier to use than plastic).

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vodDfic8omA

     

    I used a 1/32 inch wide folded piece of paper and bingo my dead monitor lives.

     

    I'm a huge Apple fan, but I find it incredible that there is no official comment or instructions on this.

     

    Sad.

     

    I came within a 1/32 inch of spending $200 on a new power brick to solve a problem that I solved instead with a sliver of paper...

  • Tracer1 Calculating status...

    Well I too had the "SOS" blinking light on my A1082 (23" AC HD).  Solved the problem with the folded "W" plastic.  Works great and has been for quite some time.  But, here's the funny part.  My 90W would not work even with paper fix.  Had a 65W adapter so what the heck.  Plugged it in, didn't work, but did work on a 20".  Did the paper fix to it and it has been working great since, although I did use a very thin piece of plastice instead of paper on this one.  So now I have a 65W adapter working a a 23" Apple Cinema HD monitor that Apple (& everyone else) says is impossible.  The monitor works perfect.....goes to sleep with the computer, wakes up everytime, & works if I unplug it or move it.  But it won't work without the "fix".  I have to agree that the covered pin is a sensor, that senses if the correct (65W?) PSU is being used & not a ground.  One other note......seems I saw this somewhere here, that the USB & Firewire is plugged in to the monitor.  Mine works with or without those plugged in, if that makes any difference.

    Many thanks to Jakobeon for his finding this "fix".  If he doesn't work for Apple, he should.  But then he would have cut Apple out of a lot of money. 

    BTW....does anyone know why the 65W is working with this monitor?

  • Drew Reece (Re:co) Level 2 Level 2 (310 points)

    Tracer1 wrote:

     

    So now I have a 65W adapter working a a 23" Apple Cinema HD monitor that Apple (& everyone else) says is impossible.  The monitor works perfect.....goes to sleep with the computer, wakes up everytime, & works if I unplug it or move it.  But it won't work without the "fix".  I have to agree that the covered pin is a sensor, that senses if the correct (65W?) PSU is being used & not a ground. 

     

    That doesn't sound like a great idea. The power supply will be overloaded. It's possible the 23" display will draw up to 90W. You can use higher rated supplies with lower rated displays, but going the other way is not advisable.

    I'd expect the power supply to get hot, I think it should have a thermal cutout circuit, but it may invalidate your insurance if it burns your property down!

     

    The center pin is used to determine what supply is hooked up, to prevent higer rated displays using lower rated supplies. Blocking the connection removes the ability for the display to detect the type of power supply, so it powers up the backlights (the part that draw a lot of current).

  • Tracer1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks for the reply & info.  Appreciate it.

  • hexdiy Level 1 Level 1 (60 points)

    I do concur 100% with Drew above, Tracer1! The Jacobeon fix indeed impairs the monitor's ability to determine whether or not a suitable power adapter is attached to it. That actually is the only catch to this fix! I thought this would have been clear to anybody who has read this monster thread thoroughly.

    Your 65W PSU is theoretically only capable of driving a 20" ACD. This means you are now seriously overdrawing the capacities of your PSU, and it does it al lot of credit that it has not died on you already!

    Seeing you have a defective 90 W powerbrick, you may consider cutting off its power chord and soldering it onto a universal 24V DC/ 90W PSU. Any PSU meeting these specs will do, just do not use any with less than a 90W rating!  The 0.675 V difference in voltage will not matter. And keep using the Jacobeon fix of course. Suitable PSUs can be had for under 50$ in most computer stores, the difficulty is the proprietary connector.

    Anyhow, good luck and thanks for keeping us posted. Especially the bit on the sense lines, for there seem to be a lot of stubborn characters here who persist in believing the middle pins are grounding pins! I suggest they try using a multimeter for once...:-)

  • Tracer1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks hexdiy.......I agree with Drew 100% also.  I don't use the 65W per se to use the monitor.  I used it to test if my monitor was bad.  I thought if my monitor was shot, what could it hurt, it was just a way to test it.  Nothing blew up, nothing burned down.  Again, I don't recommend or endorse this test, so no lawsuits please.  I now have another 90W but I still had to use the paper fix.  So that tells me it is a problem with the monitor.  I had a friend that has the 23" also & he changed out the cables from the back of the monitor, & his now runs like it should.  Apple store said his adapter brick was toast, no good.

    You have to understand, Apple tech are trained to replace parts, not repair them.  Apple also said the 65W would not even turn the screen on. 

    If you look at the specs on all 3 bricks, the AC input is the same.  The DC output is the difference:

      65W............2.65a

      90W............. 3.7a

    150W..............6.1a

    I don't recommend anyone using the 65W, don't get me wrong & I started to get the 150W but decided to stay with the 90W.  That's just me.  I really appreciate the feedback from both of you guys.  I asked an opinion, you guys gave an honest one, & that should be what a forum is about.

    Again.......thanks to jakobeon for the fix.  Don't know how he did it, but he was right on.

  • Drew Reece (Re:co) Level 2 Level 2 (310 points)

    hexdiy wrote:

     

    I thought this would have been clear to anybody who has read this monster thread thoroughly.

     

    There is a ton of info hidden in here & in the ehmac.ca forum.

    I managed to fix a display with this issue & blogged about it so go back a couple of pages & follow my pixelchimp links. I tried to gather up the releveant posts from this thread & the other ones that helped me.

    It's possible yours has failed in a different way.

     

    Tracer1 wrote:

    I had a friend that has the 23" also & he changed out the cables from the back of the monitor, & his now runs like it should.  Apple store said his adapter brick was toast, no good.

    You have to understand, Apple tech are trained to replace parts, not repair them.  Apple also said the 65W would not even turn the screen on. 

     

    If you and your friend are technically capable it would be a good move (IMO) to take out the 3 pin connector from the main board & test the continuity between the 3 pin jack that is internal to the display & the 10 pin connector on the PSU end. I doubt the moderators will like this kind of talk so use my contact form if things start dissapearing. You're right about the Apple certified technicians, it's most cost effective to break the machines down to large components & switch out them. The troubleshooting guide is designed to isolate which 'lump' to replace. They get paid set rates for jobs too, so the long jobs can cost them money.

     

    Anyway, good luck :^)

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