1 9 10 11 12 13 Previous Next 194 Replies Latest reply: Feb 19, 2012 3:33 PM by tooma3 Go to original post
  • 180. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    Tom in London Level 4 Level 4 (1,585 points)

    rbetts101 wrote:

     

    Go play with Windows!

    That's exactly my plan: replace the HD in my mid-2009 MBP with the biggest new HD I can find, max out the RAM, install Parallels Desktop, and put Windows 7 on a separate partition. Keep using Snow Leopard as my main OS.

     

    Keep Lion (or ML or whatever) on a separate computer, as a curiosity item.

     

    In about 3-4 years' time if the MacOS hasn't got any better and Windows hasn't got any worse, then I'll decide which way to go.

     

    I'm guessing that by then the two systems will be almost identical. Or maybe by then Linux will have become less nerdy. I'm interested in Linux because it offers a third way that gets you away from the moneymaking clutches of the two main OS companies. And there are already some interesting front ends to Linux that make it a little more user-friendly.

  • 181. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    Csound1 Level 8 Level 8 (35,445 points)

    Tom in London wrote:

     

    rbetts101 wrote:

     

    Go play with Windows!

    That's exactly my plan: replace the HD in my mid-2009 MBP with the biggest new HD I can find, max out the RAM, install Parallels Desktop, and put Windows 7 on a separate partition. Keep using Snow Leopard as my main OS.

     

    Keep Lion (or ML or whatever) on a separate computer, as a curiosity item.

     

    In about 3-4 years' time if the MacOS hasn't got any better and Windows hasn't got any worse, then I'll decide which way to go.

     

    I'm guessing that by then the two systems will be almost identical.

     

    Well Tom, if you plan on using 7 in Parallels there won't be a separate partition, VM's run Windows from a file stored in OSX, on the same partition.

     

    Unless you meant Boot Camp of course.

  • 182. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    Tom in London Level 4 Level 4 (1,585 points)

    Csound1 wrote:

    Well Tom, if you plan on using 7 in Parallels there won't be a seperate partition, VM's run Windows from a file stored in OSX, using the same partition.

     

     

    Oops - ok in the same partition.

  • 183. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    Csound1 Level 8 Level 8 (35,445 points)

    Tom in London wrote:

     

    Csound1 wrote:

    Well Tom, if you plan on using 7 in Parallels there won't be a seperate partition, VM's run Windows from a file stored in OSX, using the same partition.

     

     

    Oops - ok in the same partition.

    As I have no interest in gaming I have always preferred VM to BC installations, the performance hit for business apps is minor, and everything just gets backed up using my usual routine, and when I tire of Windows it is a short trip to the trashcan.

  • 184. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    papalapapp Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)

    rbetts101, could you specify that a bit more detailed?

  • 185. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    Level 8 Level 8 (41,760 points)

    nobody loopback wrote:

     

    (example: the forced reopening of the last finder windows and applications after a restart).

    Ridiculous example : you are not forced to reopen the last windows after a restart.

    The feature may be disabled.

     

    it's really funny to read ranters asking for the ability to disable this or that and complaining against features which may be disabled.

     

    Yvan KOENIG (VALLAURIS, France) samedi 18 février 2012

    iMac 21”5, i7, 2.8 GHz, 12 Gbytes, 1 Tbytes, mac OS X 10.6.8 and 10.7.3

    My Box account  is : http://www.box.com/s/00qnssoyeq2xvc22ra4k

  • 186. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    Matthew Morgan Level 7 Level 7 (22,555 points)

    Bob Jacobson wrote:

     

    Thanks for all your questions, which have the same purpose as a cross-examination in court:  ad hominem arguments that the person stating the complaint doesn't know what he/she is talking about.

    How is asking you if you use an iPhone or iPad an ad hominem argument?

     

    They are "yes" or "no" questions.

     

    All I was leading up to is: if one doesn't see value in the iPhone or iPad, whether in the enterprise or outside of it, it's going to be hard to see value in what Apple is doing with OS X.

     

    Matt

  • 187. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    nobody loopback Level 4 Level 4 (2,570 points)

    "Ridiculous example : you are not forced to reopen the last windows after a restart.

    The feature may be disabled."

     

    So, why do I have to constantly uncheck this box when I shutdown the machine  ?

    There is no control panel to uncheck that by default. At least I and several other people did not find it.

    (there is a control panel which controls whether or not the windows will reopen, but the applications are not controlled by that box).

    Even if there is one, it should be easy to locate or, explained in the shutdown dialog itself.

  • 188. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    Level 8 Level 8 (41,760 points)

    2012-02-18T23.37.11.jpg

    The pointed box is supposed to rule the feature.

    I wrote "supposed" because when I wrote that it doesn't on my machines running in French I was answered by several forum users that it does the trick on English ones.

    As it doesn't on my French system, I quit thru an AppleScript which empty the folder storing the datas used by Resume.

     

    Here is the script :

    --{code}

    display dialog "Que faire ?" buttons {"Annuler", "Redémarrer", "Éteindre"} default button 3 cancel button 1

    set |éteindre| to (button returned of result) is "Éteindre"

     

    (path to library folder from user domain as text)


    tell application "System Events"

              delete every folder of folder (result & "Saved Application State")

              if |éteindre| then

      shut down

              else

      restart

              end if

    end tell

    --{code}

     

    The English words would be :

     

    Annuler --> Cancel

    Redémarrer --> Restart

    Éteindre --> Quit (or Switch Off)

     

     

    Yvan KOENIG (VALLAURIS, France) samedi 18 février 2012

    iMac 21”5, i7, 2.8 GHz, 12 Gbytes, 1 Tbytes, mac OS X 10.6.8 and 10.7.3

  • 189. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    petermac87 Level 5 Level 5 (4,205 points)

    Apple Killed OSX With Lion. You must have been partly Psychic, as Apple is dropping the Mac from Mac OSX and all upgrades in the future from Mountain Lion onwards will be known simly as OSXs.  They dropped the word computers out of their business name sometime ago and are now Apple inc. And that makes sense as they sold more iOS devices in 2011 than they sold computers in the previous 28 years.

     

    http://www.cultofmac.com/147322/how-the-mac-will-die/?utm_campaign=twitter&utm_m edium=twitter&utm_source=twitter

     

    Times and computing habits are changing? Absolutely. Is OSX dead? No, just on a different course, as are Windows. Keep up or keep an iMac with Snow Leopard on your desk.

     

    Good Luck

     

    Pete

  • 190. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    Bob Jacobson Level 1 Level 1 (115 points)

    I have no desire for points.  I've been using Apple discussion groups for years.  My sense is that points are awarded somewhat arbitrarily, often for non-solutions as well as solutions.  Their also bruited about like army chevrons, as a mark of rank or status.  Yet I see some of the smartest advice being given on various forums by people with one tick.  Just like in the real army.  If people find my comments of interest, yea or nay, I'm satisfied.

     

    To someone's earlier comments about Apple segmenting its divisions, that seems to have inadvertently occurred with the Computer Hardware team going one direction and Software another (e.g., Mountain Lion, another weak interface, vs. the new MacBook Pros soon to arrive, more powerful than ever).  A better division given the low priority Apple assigns computers would be to split off Computers -- Hardware and Software -- as an autonomous unit and see how it does.  Build in compatibility, but not subordination.  Apple does quite well by its investment in computers -- the margin on a computer sale may be 10X that of a device's.  An autonomous unit not competing against device-driven production, marketing, and sales units could do well by Apple, the unit itself, and we customers.  Doing nothing will lead to attrition, as the new OSs are producing unprecedented negative and not so many positive reactions.  Just a thought. 

     

    As a corollary, creating horizontal and vertical monopolies is the surest route to wrack and ruin. Black Swan:  someone, somewhere, comes up with a better version of personal computing or a version equivalent to Apple's but cheaper.  Chaos.  It's a lot harder to turn an aircraft carrier than a flock of torpedo boats.

  • 191. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    nobody loopback Level 4 Level 4 (2,570 points)

    Thanks,

    thats good to know. I only tried a german system, did not work there also. Since I ditched 10.7 after 2 weeks of usage I dont know, if it still behaves the same. I only use it occasionally since then.

     

    However, even if this example now looks rather like a bug then a feature, there are many more things about this system I dislike, (rosetta, java, kerberos, no M$ exchange support for 2007 in 10.5. or no exchange support for <2007 in 10.6, sudden switch between ".hidden" files and ntfs streams, no modern browser for 10.4, forced antialiasing, apple "server" ), only to name some.

      

    The main point however is as I tried to say in my first post, that if you decided to buy an apple and you for whatever reason want to stick to it, you are in a continouous circle of upgrades, which are not only fix things, but add new features, and, remove or change the current behaviour of the system.

     

    This might not be a big thing if you have one mac. But, as soon as you run 10 or more machines you are doomed. Instead of getting a more stable system during the years, you get a mix of OS versions which is troublesome or, you have to exchange all your hardware after a short term, and following this, your software.

    Consider you have a network with Computers all running macosx 10.6, or, worse, 10.5. Now, one machine is dead. The only choice you have is to replace it with a new Mac  which comes with 10.7. Would you upgrade all remaining machine to 10.7 ? Some of them even might not be able to run the software. You might need new hardware. But you did forget to check if you favourite photoshop application runs with 10.7. Go and buy new licenses ? Oh, and you have to buy a new Microsoft Exchange Server software and hardware in addition, one year ahead of planning, some more $$$$ to spend.

    Yes, you might do that one time because there is no other way, but next time, you maybe think about switching the platform. Most likely you will not, and then have an isolated machine with 10.7. This is not good for the admins and, even worse for the users.

     

    Of course this will happen with other systems also. But not this fast as with MacOS soft and hardware. Planning upgrades and hardware renewals is much easier with Windows. The pace in which apple decides to declare something obsolete makes the usage of a Mac Product even in a small Business or Enterprise environment economically senseless, or, at least difficult, and not supporting older OS on newer hardware is a pain. Add the non existant hardware service (even with apple care you only have a bring in warranty) as an additional nail in the coffin.

     

    But apple has long ago decided to drop the business and enterprise market in favour of the consumers - what I described above is pretty normal. If you buy a couple of macs, you have to live with the consequences. Bad or good.

     

    As long as every customer buys a new iphone or macbook every two years because of the nice look or some 100 new "features" of a new OS release, there will be no problem, and even I make a profit out of this, because if something goes wrong I have the job to fix it.

  • 192. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    papalapapp Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)

    nobody loopback wrote:

     

     

    ...

    But apple has long ago decided to drop the business and enterprise market in favour of the consumers - ...

     

    That is also what I think. But I'm not sure whether they can afford to cut off productivity-oriented users.

     

    My thought is, that nowadays you can't really make a clear cut between a play/private user and a working/pro User. Everyone has to do some work in any kind on the computer.

     

    How can they design the OS around Twitter and a share-button? Don't they know about the needs of the actual working part on a Mac? Or will they use Windows machines for the "real" work in future? Or will they catch up with productivity features in a second step?

     

    Saying that, I mean the point that Phil Shiller said that they want to change the way of storing files towards app-centric and one-level. Like on the iPad. That means, form ML onwards users have to think in file-type categories regarding their documents. That's a step backwards, or not?

  • 193. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    Level 8 Level 8 (41,760 points)

    May you send a mail to my mailbox ?

     

    Click my blue name to get my address.

     

    Yvan KOENIG (VALLAURIS, France) dimanche 19 février 2012

    iMac 21”5, i7, 2.8 GHz, 12 Gbytes, 1 Tbytes, mac OS X 10.6.8 and 10.7.3

    My Box account  is : http://www.box.com/s/00qnssoyeq2xvc22ra4k

  • 194. Re: Apple killed OSX with Lion
    tooma3 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Or maybe by then Linux will have become less nerdy.

    Hi Tom. This is where Ubuntu's at at the moment so you might have to wait a little longer mate. BTW i'm with you on this one, who's out there to challenege the status quo? I suppose the answer is at least we have two players in the market which is waaaay better than one.

     

    ubuntu-8-10-alpha-1.jpg

1 9 10 11 12 13 Previous Next