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New iPad overheating?

387002 Views 1,338 Replies Latest reply: Dec 25, 2013 2:07 AM by Gordon Phillips RSS Branched to a new discussion.
  • Matt941 Calculating status...
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    Mar 24, 2012 11:20 PM (in response to faatty)

    I was at Best Buy today and was going to buy another New ipad, but they were sold out.. The sales woman said she went through 3 new ipads before she finally got one that didnt get HOT!  Obviously there is something wrong!!!! I bought one on launch and returned it 3 days later because it was getting HOT during Real Racing 2 and Modern Combat 3 and only getting worse. My wall adapater plug would actually get HOT from charging, so i wasnt gonna take the chance and burn my house down!  Im going to Best Buy tomm and try and get one, hopefully this one doesnt get HOT! I love Apple, but something has to be done!!

  • Kim Hill1 Level 2 Level 2 (160 points)
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    Mar 24, 2012 11:46 PM (in response to 4options)

    4options wrote:

     

    Apple has clearly stated that 105 to 110 degrees is normal, but you will only see those numbers if you push it which most people will not do.

     

    Agreed- with your point that most people won't use it in a way that generates these temperatures. But- I'm not aware that Apple has ever "clearly stated" any actual numeric temperature values. There's a claim in this thread that some techs did so during a service call, but that's not an official statement.

     

    4options wrote:

     

    Some trolls complain unnecessarily, some fanboys attack everyone and claim they have an ipad that doesn’t even get warm in direct contradiction to Apple any everyone who has tested them; nothing surprising.

     

    I've been critical of the trolls, but I do agree that my iPad 3 is warmer- which would actually mean: anything above room temperature- that's what my iPad 2 stayed at. For me, the mild warmth is not objectionble. I think part of Apple's problem is the standard they set with the iPad 2 — i.e. that you could have a state-of-the-art information appliance that always stayed at room temperature. Even my iPhone doesn't do that.

     

    So Apple's iPad 2 essentially saddled them with high (low?) thermal expectations that were unsustainable with the next generation of functionality/technology. We got our Retina display, but our iPads no longer stay at perfect room temperature. First world problems...

     

    4options wrote:

     

    ...are you ok with 105 to 110 degrees.  To put that in perspective most water heaters are set to 120 degrees, so 105 will not harm you but you may not want to hold it for a long time.

     

    Well, to put that in another perspective, if you've ever been in a heat-wave in the south, this would be a bit above room temperature there.

  • Kim Hill1 Level 2 Level 2 (160 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2012 12:17 AM (in response to CJinAuck)

    CJinAuck wrote:

     

    ...I'm an experience designer in my day-job...

     

    It shows- I thought your idealized description of the iPad as an "inert slab" was perfect- it tracked perfectly with my first reaction when I felt some extra warmth. It's kind of a philosophical question about the objects in our lives. Any deviation from room temperature calls attention to to the object as mechanism. You really want an inert window, not a machine. The iPad 2 afforded us this luxury, and that luxury will return in time. But what other information appliances currently provide this? Our laptops certainly don't. Other tablets don't. Our iPhones don't either, and in any case they're already at close to body temperature anyway, from being in our pockets.

     

    From a UX perspective, I look at the iPad 3 screen, which is the most perfect electronic visual representation I've ever seen- that's where I find more than sufficient UX satisfaction.

  • CJinAuck Calculating status...
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    Mar 25, 2012 2:13 AM (in response to Kim Hill1)

    Kim Hill1 wrote:


    I think part of Apple's problem is the standard they set with the iPad 2 — i.e. that you could have a state-of-the-art information appliance that always stayed at room temperature.

    Kim Hill1 wrote:


    It's kind of a philosophical question about the objects in our lives. Any deviation from room temperature calls attention to to the object as mechanism. You really want an inert window, not a machine.

     

    I agree with you 100%, Kim. And thanks for encapsulating what I've been struggling to come to terms with in the last couple of days, namely why this non-dangerous amount of heat is bugging me so much (and possibly a lot of other iPad2-upgraders, too, if this thread is anything to go by). I think the iPad2 was so revolutionary precisely because one had no sense of it being a 'machine'. It really did simply feel like a passive magical gateway into the web-verse. And I'll probably get flamed for using "magical", but it really was so far ahead of its time that I think I'm allowed ("any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic").

     

    So I find myself craving the new tech (I agree with you that the new screen is ridiculously phenomenal - it surpasses even my high expectations), but at the same time I want the magic back.  Sigh.  If I've learned anything over the last couple of days it's that - for me - the magic is winning.

     

    Kim Hill1 wrote:


    First world problems...

     

    I had to smile when I read that because I'd grabbed a take-out coffee on Saturday and it was lukewarm before I'd taken half a dozen steps out of the cafe. I was pitying my bad luck over the last couple of days - a warm new iPad but cold coffee - until I realised exactly that: "First world problems".  I got the heck over it pretty quickly after that!

  • fesarking Calculating status...
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    Mar 25, 2012 2:24 AM (in response to faatty)

    I got the new iPad on the first day, whenever I played any processor hungry apps/games, the iPad got warmed up well enough for you to feel at hand. I also found my same WIFI at home couldn't be picked by my new iPad at all places in my home. I compared the same with my iPad2, it picked everywhere. So I thought let me make a genius visit.

     

    Genius visit made an interesting find for me. I heard apple reported that the heat is well within the thermal Specifications.

     

    My new iPad was done iOS diagnostics and some test. In diagnostics there was a warning report "Device warmed up at more occasions" typically whenever I played my infinity blade or Real racing. If it was well within thermal specification of Apple, then it's a normal activity and no warning log should be triggered.

     

    Genius bar after the test agreed, my device has some wifi issues as well and my iPad was replaced. Now wifi looks good, have to test the heat. But for sure new iPad gets warmed up more than what apple set the target and it creates warning in diagnostic.

  • NyVetteGuy Level 1 Level 1 (45 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2012 4:32 AM (in response to Matt941)

    Um..dont all wall plug transformers get above room temperature when charging whatever device they are tasked to charge??

  • rbrylawski Level 6 Level 6 (10,785 points)
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    Mar 25, 2012 9:34 AM (in response to 4options)

    4options wrote:

     

    No new ipad stays cool no matter what.  Anyone who says that is misinformed.  Put brightness at 100, plug it in, and play a graphically intensive game (or just leave it running on the garage sequence in Road Warrior Racing Free) then you will get temperatures exceeding 95 in the corner to the left of the home button and those temperatures can go over 105 degrees without anyone considering it an actual problem.  It is just up to you if like it or not, and just by setting your brightness at 50% you will reduce the heat, get much longer battery life, and it will charge while you use it.  Most people will leave the default setting of 50% brightness and never use it for an extended period of time while plugged in and therefore never notice any excessive heat.  Apple has clearly stated that 105 to 110 degrees is normal, but you will only see those numbers if you push it which most people will not do.  Some trolls complain unnecessarily, some fanboys attack everyone and claim they have an ipad that doesn’t even get warm in direct contradiction to Apple any everyone who has tested them; nothing surprising.

     

    My local genius bar already confirmed that they had one returned that got so hot they would not hold it, and Apple Care went out of their way to ask a predetermined list of specific questions about the ipad overheating to avoid legal liability so there is no question that a small percentage have a true overheating problem.  Aside from those, it is just a matter of pushing the ipad or not, and if you do, are you ok with 105 to 110 degrees.  To put that in perspective most water heaters are set to 120 degrees, so 105 will not harm you but you may not want to hold it for a long time.

    Perhaps I should restate my findings.  I have pushed my iPad as hard as I will likely ever push it.  I have run games.  I've streamed movies for hours at 100% screen brightness.  I've streamed Pandora for hours while reading a magazine, or answering emails and my iPad has not gotten hot.  Not even overly warm.  Have I run intensive HD games hard for hours?  No, but I'm not much of a gamer.  I play angry birds from time to time, I so I did that on my new iPad and played for about an hour.  It didn't get hot.  So for me, my iPad is fine.  Now, would I expect my iPad to run warmer than my iPad 2.  Yes I would.  The screen is 4 times the resolution.  The battery is twice the size of iPad 2's battery.  The dual core processor draws much more power.  So, of course the iPad should run "warmer."  It should not, however, run "hot," and if it runs too hot to hold, it should be exchanged.

  • 4options Level 1 Level 1 (55 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2012 9:37 AM (in response to rbrylawski)

    There is a lot of conjecture, opinions, and estimations in this thread.  Warm and hot are words and mean different things to different people. I contacted Apple again and talked to a different senior advisor.  He again stated very clearly and emphatically that they consider 113 degrees as normal (he gave that number not me).  I have had two, and they did not get quite to that level but I am testing them in a cool room.  I also asked if temperatures at around 100 degrees while the device is just sitting on the home screen and not doing anything are normal, and he said yes that is perfectly normal.  He did not know how cnet came up with their low temperature readings, and again stated his number of 113 degrees as being completely normal.  I asked him about whether the reports of conditioning the battery by full discharge and recharge make any sense, and he said that would make no difference to anything.  The old style rechargeable batteries used to be affected by doing that but not the current one.  In both my ipads discharging and recharging the battery several times made no difference either.

  • Alaska99801 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2012 12:40 PM (in response to NyVetteGuy)

    Yes, they all do.  If anyone tell you otherwise, they are lying.  It is just the fact of heat and electricity.  All you have to do is check your phone, any phone, while is charging, the plug gets hot.

     

    There is too much hearsay and commentaries here that are outright lies.

  • CliveS Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2012 12:56 PM (in response to faatty)

    How many people use their iPads in temperatures outside the quoted operating temperature range? - 0-35C, 32-95F

     

    Plenty countries around the globe have temperatures exceeding 35C / 95F and well below freezing.

  • Alaska99801 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2012 1:00 PM (in response to CJinAuck)

    Here is what you do.  Take it back, get your ipad 2 back and quit complaining.  You wanted the same 10 hours of battery life,right?  You wanted the retina display, right?  You wanted it to stay almost as thin and heavy as the ipad 2, right?

    You get all that and complain about the thing getting warm.  Man, you guys are something else. You are a designer you say, can you do miracles when you come to the law of physics limitation? No you can with the technology we have today. So why do you expect Apple to be able to break physics barriers about heat, electricity, display design (which is not even in their hands. By the way later on, some displays will be made by Sharp, and that new technology will run the display cooler. Porbably in a month), etc., and still give you a fine product.

     

    I have had mine since march 16 and I noticed because of this forum that it gets a little warm.  No wifi issue. I guess, no, I know, that the majority of you are just here to complain and not to learn anything, which is what these forums are for.

    If you feel bad about your purchase, just take it back and shut up!  Buyers remorse must be **** for you.

     

    Where is Clint when we need him????   LOL.

  • aclockworkorangutan Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2012 1:09 PM (in response to faatty)

    Is there some application I can download that will run constantly and put my iPad to the test? Like a "stress test" program that does HD video, math calculations, etc. If I had such a program I could run it for like an hour and see if my iPad gets hot too.

  • BlueSeas25 Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2012 1:18 PM (in response to faatty)

    I just tried running that modern combat game for 20 minutes, my Ipad gets warm in the left bottom corner of the device. The only thing I can compare it to is my forehead, and it is cooler to the touch than my forehead, this does not seem abnormal to me. Doing normal things (Safari, Netflix, Mail etc etc) I do not notice any heat on the device at all, and it is usually cool to the touch. Unfortunately I need to get it exchanged because there is a large peice of dust or black plastic stuck under the glass itself, so I am now worried I will get a hot running device. For $740, these sorts of problems should not exist.

  • BeersYourFriend Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2012 1:41 PM (in response to BlueSeas25)

    I agree the it should not exist, but it is what it is. Just except it, and like many others... Enjoy your new iPad! I was upset at first too, but all iPads are the same, and don't think your the only one. Mine gets hot too, but I have a case, which most people will put on anyways. You won't feel the heat, and case is not going to overheat your device. Even with a case, I can feel the heat disapating from the charge port, but that's just the way it is. Again, I understand where your coming from, and think its the principle of the matter, that a handheld device should not be uncomfortable. Unfortunetly, for some, it does. And, for some, there may be a bad battery, or ther malfunction... But, all iPads get warm, and just except it. Or else, your never going to enjoy your iPad. Just buy nice case for it, and be done with it. It's not going to overheat in a case, and if it does.... Well, it has a 1 year warrenttee!

     

    Enjoy your iPad, or return it.

    Your not going to get a better tablet out there!

     

    Peace!

  • Alaska99801 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2012 2:07 PM (in response to BeersYourFriend)

    I admire your patience.  I don't have it.

     

    Good Sunday to you.

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