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"Sudden sleep" issue with Macbook Pro & Lion

3395 Views 10 Replies Latest reply: Apr 13, 2012 5:56 AM by Linc Davis RSS
DHaythorn Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
Currently Being Moderated
Apr 9, 2012 3:55 AM

Hi everyone,

 

I have a 2010 MacBook Pro. I have just upgraded to Lion and it seems to have acquired a major glitch. It suddenly it goes to sleep at random moments. I can't quite work out what the trigger might be at the moment, but doubtless over time it will become clearer. Is this a known bug? If so are there any fixes for it?

 

Thanks!

 

Dan

MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.7.3)
  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (107,745 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 10, 2012 5:18 AM (in response to DHaythorn)

    That's a completely different story from the one in your original post. You're referring to display sleep, not computer sleep, and it happens at regular intervals, not at "random moments."

     

    First, set the display sleep timer to a shorter interval, such as five minutes. Does the same thing happen at five-minute intervals?

  • BrUdDaJamm Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 10, 2012 5:29 AM (in response to Linc Davis)

    https://discussions.apple.com/message/18089514#18089514 Sorry linc, I'm sure this is improper etiquette, But I was following your advice and I need your help! lol Pretty please, and sorry for interupting on this thread xD

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (107,745 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 10, 2012 12:54 PM (in response to DHaythorn)

    OK, so now the issue is that the screen saver is engaging regardless of input activity.

     

    Please read this whole message before doing anything.

     

    This procedure is a test, not a solution. Don’t be disappointed when you find that nothing has changed after you complete it.

     

    Step 1

     

    The purpose of this step is to determine whether the problem is localized to your user account.

     

    Enable guest logins and log in as Guest. For instructions, launch the System Preferences application, select Help from the menu bar, and enter “Set up a guest account” (without the quotes) in the search box.

     

    While logged in as Guest, you won’t have access to any of your personal files or settings. Applications will behave as if you were running them for the first time. Don’t be alarmed by this; it’s normal. If you need any passwords or other personal data in order to complete the test, memorize, print, or write them down before you begin.

     

    While logged in as Guest, set the screen saver to engage on a short timeout. Test. Same problem?

     

    After testing, log out of the guest account and, in your own account, disable it if you wish. Any files you created in the guest account will be deleted automatically when you log out of it.

     

    Note: If you’ve activated “Find My Mac” or FileVault in Mac OS X 10.7 or later, then you can’t enable the Guest account. Create a new account in which to test, and delete it, including its home folder, after testing.

     

    Step 2

     

    The purpose of this step is to determine whether the problem is caused by third-party system modifications that load automatically at startup or login.

     

    Disconnect all wired peripherals except those needed for the test, and remove all aftermarket expansion cards. Boot in safe mode and log in to the account with the problem. The instructions provided by Apple are as follows:

     

    • Be sure your Mac is shut down.
    • Press the power button.
    • Immediately after you hear the startup tone, hold the Shift key. The Shift key should be held as soon as possible after the startup tone, but not before the tone.
    • Release the Shift key when you see the gray Apple icon and the progress indicator (looks like a spinning gear).

     

    Safe mode is much slower to boot and run than normal, and some things won’t work at all, including wireless networking on certain Macs.

     

    The login screen appears even if you usually log in automatically. You must know your login password in order to log in. If you’ve forgotten the password, you will need to reset it before you begin.

     

    Test while in safe mode. Same problem?

     

    After testing, reboot as usual (i.e., not in safe mode) and verify that you still have the problem. Post the results of steps 1 and 2.

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (107,745 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 13, 2012 5:02 AM (in response to DHaythorn)

    Does the screen saver not start at all in safe mode, even when it should?

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (107,745 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 13, 2012 5:56 AM (in response to DHaythorn)

    Please read this whole message before doing anything.

     

    This procedure is a diagnostic test. It won’t solve your problem. Don’t be disappointed when you find that nothing has changed after you complete it.

     

    Third-party system modifications are a common cause of usability problems. By a “system modification,” I mean software that affects the operation of other software — potentially for the worse. The following procedure will help identify which such modifications you've installed. Don’t be alarmed by the complexity of these instructions — they’re easy to carry out and won’t change anything on your Mac.

     

    These steps are to be taken while booted in “normal” mode, not in safe mode. If you’re now running in safe mode, reboot as usual before continuing.

     

    Below are instructions to enter some UNIX shell commands. The commands are harmless, but they must be entered exactly as given in order to work. If you have doubts about the safety of the procedure suggested here, search this site for other discussions in which it’s been followed without any report of ill effects.

     

    Some of the commands will line-wrap or scroll in your browser, but each one is really just a single line, all of which must be selected. You can accomplish this easily by triple-clicking anywhere in the line. The whole line will highlight, and you can then either copy or drag it. The headings “Step 1” and so on are not part of the commands.

     

    Note: If you have more than one user account, Step 2 must be taken as an administrator. Ordinarily that would be the user created automatically when you booted the system for the first time. The other steps should be taken as the user who has the problem, if different. Most personal Macs have only one user, and in that case this paragraph doesn’t apply.

     

    Launch the Terminal application in any of the following ways:

     

    ☞ Enter the first few letters of its name into a Spotlight search. Select it in the results (it should be at the top.)

     

    ☞ In the Finder, select Go ▹ Utilities from the menu bar, or press the key combination shift-command-U. The application is in the folder that opens.

     

    ☞ If you’re running Mac OS X 10.7 or later, open LaunchPad. Click Utilities, then Terminal in the page that opens.

     

    When you launch Terminal, a text window will open with a line already in it, ending either in a dollar sign (“$”) or a percent sign (“%”). If you get the percent sign, enter “sh” (without the quotes) and press return. You should then get a new line ending in a dollar sign.

     

    Step 1

     

    Copy or drag — do not type — the line below into the Terminal window, then press return:

     

    kextstat -kl | awk '!/com\.apple/{printf "%s %s\n", $6, $7}'
    

     

    Post the lines of output (if any) that appear below what you just entered (the text, please, not a screenshot.)

     

    Step 2

     

    Repeat with this line:

     

    sudo launchctl list | sed 1d | awk '!/0x|com\.(apple|openssh|vix)|edu\.mit|org\.(amavis|apache|cups|isc|ntp|postfix|x)/{print $3}'
    

     

    This time, you'll be prompted for your login password, which won't be displayed when you type it. You may get a one-time warning not to screw up. You don't need to post the warning.

     

    Step 3

     

    launchctl list | sed 1d | awk '!/0x|com\.apple|edu\.mit|org\.(x|openbsd)/{print $3}'
    

     

    Step 4

     

    ls -1A /e*/mach* {,/}L*/{Ad,Compon,Ex,Fram,In,Keyb,La,Mail/Bu,P*P,Priv,Qu,Scripti,Servi,Spo,Sta}* L*/Fonts 2> /dev/null
    

     

    Important: If you synchronize with a MobileMe account, your me.com email address may appear in the output of the above command. If so, anonymize it before posting.

     

    Step 5

     

    osascript -e 'tell application "System Events" to get name of every login item' 2> /dev/null
    

     

    Remember, steps 1-5 are all drag-and-drop or copy-and-paste, whichever you prefer — no typing, except your password. Also remember to post the output.

     

    You can then quit Terminal.

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