1 3 4 5 6 7 Previous Next 97 Replies Latest reply: Apr 13, 2012 8:07 PM by MlchaelLAX Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • 75. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    petermac87 Level 5 Level 5 (4,205 points)

    Jim Downward wrote:

     

    While I do understand the arguments as to why it is not possible to install Snow Leopard Client in a virtual machine, because it was really important for me not to loose access to certain research files, in one of my "Oh heck, what have I got to loose moments", I followed instructions found on various sites and managed to install Snow Leopard onto the latest version of VirtualBox.  Although the instructions to create a diskimage of the Snow Leopard installation disk which Vbox could read, failed (Vbox would not boot from disk image I created), just as I was about to give up, VirtualBox booted directly and unexpectedly from the Snow Leopard installation CD and proceeded to install Snow Leopard.  While use of VirtualBox is a bit kludgy to say the least (I would much prefer to be using Parallels), it came up, was able to connect to the internet (after some screwing around), and installed all the required updates.  Since file sharing between VirtualBox and Mac OS X is rather weak, I set my entire hard disk to be shared, added a second ethernet virtual adapter (this must be done to access the shared volume), and moved over my critical application files.  Photoshop CS, Prism, Office V.x, and Office 2004 all ran, which made me a very happy camper indeed.

     

    While the entire process eventually worked, it did require a lot of fiddling and trying different things out. Figuring out how to change the screen size took a bit of Internet slewthing, but the information was there.  However, I never had to modify disk images to make VirtualBox think I was installing Snow Leopard Server or do anything really arcane.  Whether or not I could repeat the process easily, I really don't know.  But indeed running Snow Leopard in a VirtualBox is possible and at no time did I encounter any indication that only Snow Leopard Server could be installed.

     

    I am posting this to suggest that hope is possible, not to engage in a flame war.  Below is a picture of my virtual system

    Virtual Snow Leopard.png

    Peace 

    Still seems a lot more sensible to upgrade your programs. I had two PPC programs remaining when I updated. Now all my software is compatable with Lion, which was pretty much the idea when Apple began phasing out PPC well over 6 years ago. PPC Macs themselves could not even run Snow Leopard. Seems like a complicated way to go about holding on to the last renants of an outdated program (Rosetta) which was only ever included as one last chance for users to get somewhere near modern software.

     

    Good Luck, but it's not for most of us.

     

    Pete

  • 76. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    BDAqua Level 10 Level 10 (116,480 points)

    There are no equivelents for many PPC Apps as far as I'm concerned, & I don't understand why if it's possible for a Virtual machine to run Rosetta... why it's not permitted, & why Lion or ML can't!???

  • 77. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    petermac87 Level 5 Level 5 (4,205 points)

    BDAqua wrote:

     

    There are no equivelents for many PPC Apps as far as I'm concerned,

    What in particular?

     

    Pete

  • 78. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    babowa Level 7 Level 7 (23,300 points)

    I have one in particular: the gradient options in the painting portion of Appleworks can be used to create very stunning backgrounds and I use them extensively while creating art/cards/movie backgrounds from scratch. There is no replacement available unless I were to spend thousands, so I maintain an SL partition I can boot into.

  • 79. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    petermac87 Level 5 Level 5 (4,205 points)

    Which is fine. I just got over AppleWorks. Would have actually have liked Apple to continue developing it, but so long since I've used it I am more familiar with Adobe, Corel and Creator these days. Holding onto a SL partition makes sense. Continuing Rosetta support does not.

     

    Good luck

     

    Pete

  • 80. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    Antony D'Emanuele Level 2 Level 2 (305 points)

    I still use Eudora and I presently have no upgrade path if I go to Lion. I also use Mail and Outlook at work, however, Eudora is still my prefered email client...

  • 81. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    petermac87 Level 5 Level 5 (4,205 points)

    Eudora is REALLY dark ages stuff!! Lol

     

    Pete

  • 82. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    Antony D'Emanuele Level 2 Level 2 (305 points)

    It is indeed, but so much more powerful (and faster) than Mail and Outlook....

  • 83. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,745 points)

    Jim: Good for you!

     

    Jim, Antony & BDÅqua:

    Lion-Snow+Leopard.jpg

     

    This is the screenshot of my mid-2011 Mac Mini running Lion (then 10.7.1; now 10.7.3) and concurrently in the Parallels 7 windows is Snow Leopard (10.6.8) with Quicken 2002 and Microsoft Excel 2004 running within it.

     

    It works, it's stable, it CAN be relied upon and I use it 24/7/365. It takes less effort than the "backup your HD, partition your HD, restore your backup into one partion and install Snow Leopard into the other partition" so-called solution proposed by others (that actually will NOT work on the newer machines, such as my mid-2011 Mac Mini) and you do not have to purchase an external HD.

     

    You need help with getting Parallels 7 to run Snow Leopard?  Let me know.  Those that have are very happy campers!

  • 84. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,995 points)

    I did try to update/upgrade everything to Intel native, but there is no replacement for two apps I must have.

     

    1) oXYgen Scan for Scitex/Creo/Kodak flat bed scanners. The closest they came to making these Intel native is they made the kernel driver Intel 32 bit (that's right, you can't boot 64 bit and use the scanner), and a secondary app that controls communication between the scanner and the actual scanning software interface. Everything else is PPC code. So I can use the scanner up through Snow Leopard and no further. But even then, not in a VM. The software will only look for the scanner on a FireWire port, and not a single VM supports FW port linking; USB only. So in order to use the scanner at all, I have to boot directly into SL.

     

    The software was written specifically for these X-Y auto stitching scanners. There is nothing else that will drive them. Not Silverfast, VueScan, etc. Kodak shut down the scanning division entirely and even bulldozed the Israeli plant where they were made (Scitex was originally an Israeli company). So the only way this software will ever become full Intel native is if Kodak sells the rights to the software to someone willing to port it.

     

    And nope, there are no other flat bed scanners that even come close to the image quality of these things. Only high end PMT (Photo Multiplier Tube) drum scanners can produce a better image. So as far as I'm concerned, they can't be replaced.

     

    2) Monaco Profiler. X-Rite now owns (and discontinued) both Profiler and Gretag-Macbeth's Profile Maker. They took the best features of each and released i1 Profiler as an Intel only replacement. Great! It produces more accurate profiles than even the previously best software, Monaco Profiler.

     

    Bad news. There is no scanner profiling module in i1 Profiler. Nor is there a profile editor. Mandatory for anyone in printing/prepress. It made an awful lot of people scratch their heads when they saw i1 Profiler couldn't do that. So there we are, stuck with the PPC code only Monaco Profiler to able to do these two functions.

  • 85. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,745 points)

    Kurt:

     

    Pick up the cheapest Mac Mini you can find in Craigslist, eBay, Amazon, Apple store refurbished; that will run Snow Leopard and work with your proprietary software.

     

    Connect one of your external displays to the Mac Mini or borrow one if you have to.  Connect it through FireWire to your scanner and connect it to your intra-network either through Ethernet or Airport.

     

    Install your proprietary software (oXYgen Scan and Monaco Profiler).

     

    In System Preferences: Sharing - turn on Screen Sharing.

     

    In System Preferences: Network: Advanced... - Select DHCP with Manual Address and give it a Fixed IP.

     

    Shut it down, remove the Display and Restart it (older Mac Minis may require the Display Adapter to be connected to make it think that a Display is connected; newer ones do not).

     

    On your main computer, in the Finder: Use the GO menu to Connect to Server and enter "vnc://192.168.0.100" but do not enter the quotation marks and substitute the Fixed IP from the older Mac Mini, click the + symbol to "remember" this entry and then click CONNECT.  Click the Green Button in the upper left hand of the window or otherwise resize it to full screen.

     

    On your Mac Mini connect to your main computer for File Sharing as needed, and mount the folders where you keep your important data.

     

    I use my Lion Mac Mini as my "server" and it stores all of my data files, serves them out to all of my computers and uses Time Machine for backup.  Before I perfected the "Rosetta in Parallels 7 solution" I was able to use my Lion Mac Mini to remotely control another Mac Mini that was running my Rosetta software in Snow Leopard that in turn was using my data files and saving them back to my Lion Mac Mini.  At the same time I was able to use my Lion Mac Mini to run all of my non-Rosetta software, too.

     

    Then you can upgrade your main computer to Lion and iCloud.

     

    In this way you can control your Lion and Snow Leopard environments on one screen via screen sharing and can run your proprietary software.

  • 86. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,995 points)

    Pick up the cheapest Mac Mini you can find in Craigslist, eBay, Amazon, Apple store refurbished; that will run Snow Leopard and work with your proprietary software.

    Thanks, but no need to. I bought a Mac Pro with the Westmere CPUs and shipped with Snow Leopard (practically one of the last ones B&H Photo and Video had that didn't come with Lion) to cover myself with as new a Mac as I could get that would boot to SL.

     

    We repurposed an older Core Duo 2 iMac as a Lion Server. We were running Snow Leopard Server on it, but ran into the very well known problem of the server refusing to save files. You constantly get .afpdeleted errors or not having permission. In both cases, SL Server VERY stupidly deletes the file you were saving!!! It's not a total disaster, but you have to remember to save the file again immediately before closing it on your client computer.

     

    We had heard and read the Lion Server solved this issue. So I installed it and whadayaknow? We haven't seen an .afpdeleted message once, and only one instance of a person suddenly not having permission to save a file they've already saved a couple of times with no error message. Just super that Apple found the problem but force users to upgrade to Lion Server for such a critical OS error instead of issuing a patch for Snow Leopard Server.

  • 87. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,745 points)

    Any port in a Rosetta storm!

  • 88. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    Jim Downward Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    I am quite willing to upgrade programs. Sadly, it was not always possible either for economic reasons or because the vendor never upgraded their software to run on Intel Macs.

     

    For example, I owned a small R&D company.  From 1990 until when it closed,we created somewhere between 15,000 to 20,000 Microsoft Word, Excell, and Powerpoint documents.  Critical Word documents were created in 4, Word 5.1, Word 6, and Word V.x, and Word 2004.  Similarly, we had Excel, and Powerpoint documents created (and still readable) using ancient versions of Excel and Powerpoint.  Office 2008 only reads some of the old document formats, and Office 2011 reads even fewer.  So over the course of several months, before installing Lion, I tracked down (across multiple computers) and converted each of these documents so as to be readable using Office 2008.  What pain!

     

    However, some of the scientific data analysis software we used was rather expensive, and the upgrade fees would have been huge.  In addition, we use TurboTax.  In the event of an audit, we need to be able to access our tax information going back at least 7 years.  Unfortunately, current versions of Turbotax just do not open Turbotax files created by previous versions.

     

    All in all, I am quite envious of those who have been easily able to upgrade to Lion without having to deal with losing the ability to run programs which depended on Rosetta.

  • 89. Re: Claims of Rosetta working
    Jim Downward Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    MIchael

     

    As I only own the client version of Snow Leopard, I am certainly interested in learning what one does to install Snow Leopard in Parallels 7. 

     

    Jim

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