11 Replies Latest reply: Apr 17, 2012 12:26 PM by Achenstrasse
Achenstrasse Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

My internal HD is partitioned. It was done by the Apple Tech guys when I bought my Imac 25". One section of the HD  is called 'Admin" & the other "Data". The guy said it was a good idea to do this, however I've runout of space on my "Admin" section (the HD was split 50/50). I now want to install Lion but the Imac is saying i've not got enough space. There's no even enough to install software updates.

I've googled  for instructions but I can't "unpartion" using Disk Utility  because I'm being told "This partition is the Startup disk, it cannot be erased". I've therefore come to a dead end. What do I do?

I back up to an external HD using Time Machine.

Also can someone tell me what files you should normally have in an "admin" partition. I seems to have all sorts of files in it. Can I just drag those files over into my "data" section & then delete the file in "admin"?


macbook & Imac, Mac OS X (10.6.2)
  • 1. Re: UN-PARTITIONING A HARD DRIVE
    MGW Level 7 Level 7 (27,000 points)

    The advice you were given was not particularly good, you had no need to partition your drive, all data can be written to the whole drive, an admin partition is nonsense..  I suggest you reinstall your OS, then resore from Time Machine, that will give you the whole drive to use.

     

     

  • 2. Re: UN-PARTITIONING A HARD DRIVE
    Klaus1 Level 8 Level 8 (44,495 points)

    I agree with Miriam, what you can do is either change the size of one of the partitions - or delete it.

     

    To resize (or delete) an existing partition without losing data, you will need to use, for example, iPartition:

     

    http://www.coriolis-systems.com/iPartition.php

     

    But it is not free.

  • 3. Re: UN-PARTITIONING A HARD DRIVE
    Silly rabbit Level 4 Level 4 (2,980 points)

    Oh, my dog! The 'geniuses' told you to do it? Unbelievable! That's a Windoze thing and completely unnecessary on a Mac. Macs actually run better without partitions.

     

    The best thing for you to do is to back up all your data, boot from your restore disc, open the disc utility on the disc, remove the partition, reformat the hard drive and start again. Do you have a Time Machine back up you can use to restore your machine after reformatting the hard drive?

     

    Just note that, none of your older software will run in Lion.

  • 4. Re: UN-PARTITIONING A HARD DRIVE
    baltwo Level 9 Level 9 (60,115 points)

    Silly rabbit wrote:

    Macs actually run better without partitions.

    Debatable, while the info on solving the OP's issue is appropriate. I've always partitioned my HDs, since that's the only way to run multiple OSs and installers.

  • 5. Re: UN-PARTITIONING A HARD DRIVE
    Silly rabbit Level 4 Level 4 (2,980 points)

    baltwo wrote: I've always partitioned my HDs, since that's the only way to run multiple OSs and installers.

     

    Yes, of course! I have mine partitioned with BootCamp to run Lion. But, this machine was set up to keep data on a separate partition, which only slows down Finder.

  • 6. Re: UN-PARTITIONING A HARD DRIVE
    baltwo Level 9 Level 9 (60,115 points)

    Never have seen the issue, but then I've never tested speeds. Most things just pop up. I have data volumes, volumes with disk images, and volumes for restoring the OS. Can't say any cause any slowdowns.

  • 7. Re: UN-PARTITIONING A HARD DRIVE
    Klaus1 Level 8 Level 8 (44,495 points)

    baltwo wrote:

     

    Never have seen the issue, but then I've never tested speeds. Most things just pop up. I have data volumes, volumes with disk images, and volumes for restoring the OS. Can't say any cause any slowdowns.

     

    Me neither. In fact logic dictates that, wth less 'baggage' to carry, it should speed up the finder.

  • 8. Re: UN-PARTITIONING A HARD DRIVE
    Silly rabbit Level 4 Level 4 (2,980 points)

    Klaus1 wrote: In fact logic dictates that, wth less 'baggage' to carry, it should speed up the finder.

     

    Until you search or use spotlight, then there is a marked difference. It is the same as having hundreds of files on your desktop. Finder will search the home folders first.

  • 9. Re: UN-PARTITIONING A HARD DRIVE
    Klaus1 Level 8 Level 8 (44,495 points)

    You should never have hundreds of files (or indeed any) on your desktop!

     

    I use Easyfind - so much better than Spotlight.

  • 10. Re: UN-PARTITIONING A HARD DRIVE
    baltwo Level 9 Level 9 (60,115 points)

    Silly rabbit wrote:

    Until you search or use spotlight, then there is a marked difference. It is the same as having hundreds of files on your desktop.

    More FUD. Matt Neuberg in a Tidbits or MacInTouch posting stated:

     

     

    It "used" to be the case the desktop icons were implemented as windows in Mac OS X, so that a large number of icons on the desktop did in fact mean a heavy resource usage and a drop in performance (it could even result in spinning beachballs). But that implementation was changed completely some revisions back (I think it was Leopard), and now it doesn't matter at all how many icons you have on your desktop.

     

    BTW, Spotlight works fairly well if you use a tailored SavedSearch—still won't find everything, but I've filed a bug report against that failure.ss4.png

  • 11. Re: UN-PARTITIONING A HARD DRIVE
    Achenstrasse Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I'd like to thank everyone who has taken the time to respond to my question. It is really gratifying that there are so many people in the Mac Community out there who will give up their time to help others.

    I can't remember why it was initally partitioned ( I think it was because I wanted to run Windows as I had some software I needed to use) but it's causing my load of problems at the moment because I want to moved to iCloud & there's no space on my partitioned HD (where the apps are stored) to take the upgrade. I can't even install updates that I'm being told are available. I'm just waiting for a new  (3T) HD  to arrive from Amazon to dump all of my stuff on & then I've decided on a total clean sweep as I've had the Imac for 4 years & it could do with it.

    Thanks again folks,

    Gerry