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Applescript wanted: create album for every Project

1619 Views 12 Replies Latest reply: May 8, 2012 7:04 AM by jfaughnan RSS
jfaughnan Level 3 Level 3 (780 points)
Currently Being Moderated
May 6, 2012 3:13 PM

I've recently migrated from iPhoto to Aperture.

 

In iPhoto Apple made it very convenient to create create and manage Events (Aperture Projects). I used to create a lot of Albums, but iPhoto Events were so well done I created fewer Albums.

 

Now I'm working in Aperture. It's management of Projects/Events is nowhere near as sophisticated as iPhoto's features. I'm shifting back to working with Albums.

 

To ease that transition I'm looking for an AppleScript that will create one album for every Aperture Project.

 

Does anyone know of an AppleScript like that? I couldn't find anything in my Goolge searches.

Aperture 3, Mac OS X (10.6.8)
  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,510 points)

    What features exactly are you missing from iPhoto events that you do not find in Aperture projects?

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,510 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 6, 2012 10:30 PM (in response to jfaughnan)

    I'd often select a group of photos and create a new event,

    To split a project in Aperture select the images in the browser and press ⌘-N (File -> New -> Project). Enable the "Move selected items to new project" button, and you will have split your project successfully.

    If your current project is located in a folder and you have selected that folder, then the new split project will be created in the same folder.

     

    I also miss the ease of creating and editing Event titles;

    projectsView.png

    Do you browse your projects in "Projects" View? Editing the project properties is very simple when you open the Inspector in Projects View (click the "i"-button in the lower left corner.

    In projects view you can merge  projects by dragging one onto top of each other and select to see the projects grouped by folders, or arranged by name, date...

     

    I think you are on the right track by using folders to group your projects. And keep the size of the projects small; you can nest your folders hierarchically.

     

    Regards

    Léonie

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,510 points)

    For a professional photographer or serious hobbyist I expect there's a natural relationship between an Import action and a Project. A wedding or a sports event, for example, is a natural Project. Splitting and merging and refactoring projects/events isn't a part of every Import action.

    You are perfectly right - and events in iPhoto are very servicable structuring elements for events.

     

    But projects in Aperture are not designed to be used this way. They are nothing more and nothing less than containers for a small subset of your images - more like a filmroll in the ancient times of photography. Projects should be small - don't make them larger than max 200 images; otherwise you risk to make Aperture slow. The name "project" is misleading. For a real life project (wedding, vacation) use a folder to organize the bits and pieces - the different shoots, books, lighttables, slideshows. A projects in Aperture is more like a video clips in a movie project - the basic items to build the products from.

     

    Good Luck!

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,510 points)

    Do you know why a 1000 image Project would slow Aperture? Smells like a bug ...

    No, it is not a bug - it is a question of computational complexity. And it is not a hard restriction. I occasionally have projects with a 1000 images, but I try to avoid that. It's a gradual decrease in performance if you make your projects very large - not a constant spinning of the beachball.

     

    Aperture loads and caches the images of the currently selected item for speedy browsing and searching. And the special views - Places, Faces act differently, are depending on the currently selected project or album.

     

    It's simply the following: If you switch to "places" or "faces" view while browsing a project, Aperture has to scan all images in the project, and the fewer images a project has, the quicker will be the response. The same goes for smart albums defined relative to a project.

     

    Computationally expensive are smart albums defined relative to the whole library. It is perfectly o.k. to use them, but you should use them wisely and should be frugal with those.

     

    A huge library is no problem for Aperture - it is designed to hold many Terabytes of images in one library distributed about several volumes, but a badly designed library may make Aperture slower.

     

    Regards

    Léonie

  • SierraDragon Level 4 Level 4 (2,665 points)

    jfaughnan wrote:

     

    I've recently migrated from iPhoto to Aperture.

     

    In iPhoto Apple made it very convenient to create create and manage Events (Aperture Projects). I used to create a lot of Albums, but iPhoto Events were so well done I created fewer Albums.

     

    Now I'm working in Aperture. It's management of Projects/Events is nowhere near as sophisticated as iPhoto's features. I'm shifting back to working with Albums.

     

    To ease that transition I'm looking for an AppleScript that will create one album for every Aperture Project.

     

    Suggesting that iPhoto is more sophisticated seems wrong to me, but I really have always used Filemaker then Aperture so I am not an iPhoto expert.

     

    Aperture facilitates keywords and Albums as very powerful tools. To specifically answer your question, just keyword a whole Project, part of a Project or just one image; you can make an Album Name a keyword. Then do a Find on that keyword to create an Album if you like. The keyword lives with the image file but the Album can be deleted if you like and recreated at any time in a few seconds.

     

     

     

    I realized there's another way to manage the Event to Album transition.

     

    In Aperture folders can hold Events and Albums alike. In iPhoto they can't mix.

     

    So I can mix the two in my organizational structure, thereby eliminating the need to create additional Albums for the existing Projects/Events.

     

    IMO organizational structures that over-use Folders are what I call Folder-think, and should be avoided in favor of database-think. Try to use keywords and Albums as much as possible in your organizing in lieu of folders. Save folders for aggregating: as per Léonie "use a folder to organize the bits and pieces - the different shoots, books, lighttables, slideshows."

     

    Consider a Project to be like a roll of film like Léonie suggested; organizationally that is the only location that the images live in. Personally I set 500 as my arbitrary maximum number of images in that roll-of-film-Project. Experiment to see what number of maximum images in a Project may or may not slow your workflow down.

     

    My boilerplate on organizing in Aperture:

     

    First, Projects should be just that: individual-shoot (i.e. time) based projects rather than some kind of organizing tool for all the architectural photos or whatever. For performance reasons personally I keep each Project under 500 20-MB images, making a second Project if the shoot is large (e.g.

    110829_KJones_Wed_A,

    110829_KJones_Wed_B,

    110829_KJones_Wed_C).

     

    One or more albums will always organize the KJones wedding pix together anyway. All three Projects (110829_KJones_Wed_A, 110829_KJones_Wed_B, 110829_KJones_Wed_C) would have the keyword "KJones_Wed" applied to each pic, which allows an Album "KJones_Wed" to be quickly created at any time.

     

    Folders are indeed flexible organizational tools but IMO often overused. Folders can effectively hide contents from view and therefore require users to remember how folders are nested and what is inside them. Folders were the only way to deal with single-original film, but are IMO limiting to image database thinking.

     

    The way I look at it conceptually:

     

    Aperture is a database (DB), and each image file lives in one Project.

     

    Albums are just collections of Pointers that point to individual image files living in one or more Projects. Since they just contain pointers, albums can be created or deleted at will without affecting image files. Very powerful. And Albums of pointers take up almost zero space, so they are fast and do not make the Library size grow.

     

    Keywords can be applied to every image separately or in batches. Keywords are hugely powerful and largely obviate the need for folders. Not that we should never use folders, just that we should use folders only when useful organizationally - - after first determining that using keywords and albums is not a better approach.

     

    As one example imagine the keyword "flowers."  Every image of a 100,000 images Library that has some flowers in it has the keyword flowers. Then say we want to put flowers in an ad, or as background for a show of some kind, or to print pix for a party, or even just to look for an image for some other reason. We can find every flower image in a 100k-image database in 2 seconds, and in another few seconds create an Album called "Flowers" that points to all of those individual images.

     

    Similarly all family pix can have a keyword "family" and all work pix can have a key word "work." Each individual pic may have any number of keywords. Such pic characteristics (work, family, flowers, etc.) should not be organized via folders.

     

    So by using keywords and albums we can have instant access to every image everywhere, very cool. And keywords and albums essentially take up no space in the database.

     

    Another approach is to use a folder "Family" for family pix, a folder "Flowers" for flowers pix and another folder "Work" for work pix. IMO such folders usage is a very poor approach to using an images database (probably stemming from old paper or film work practices). Note that one cannot put an image with family in a field of flowers at a work picnic in all three folders; but it is instant with keywords.

     

    HTH

     

    -Allen

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