10 Replies Latest reply: May 10, 2012 8:02 AM by léonie
Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6 (11,915 points)

Fell in love with the iPad screen -- purchased one (excellent as a portfolio).  Looking for general advice on using it as part of my RAW workflow.  (I have Apple's "Camera Connection Kit".)

 

Thanks  .

 

OK:  what I've done so far:  uploaded "shoots" to the iPad,  Cropped to suit. Separately imported same files into Aperture via the camera card.  Tried and failed to delete the photos albums on MiPad. That's it.  Decided to not use the iPad in my workflow until I learn more.  Removed all photos-syncing via iTunes.  Posted this message.

 

Message was edited by: Kirby Krieger


Mac OS X (10.7.3), 8 G / 500 G internal / 5 TB external / NEC 2490 / ColorMunki Pho
  • 1. Re: iPad & Aperture: general workflow suggestions?
    léonie Level 9 Level 9 (51,645 points)

    No answer, Kirby - I am thread-jacking . Which model did you choose? I want to buy one too, but I'll want it for geotagging and navigation, and maybe for browsing images, if I am away from home and do not want to take my 17" laptop along. It is funny - my 13" MBP went with me everywhere, but since I have a 17" model, that is no longer true.

     

    I wonder if it may be possible to go on a week long photo safari with only a camera and an iPad.

     

     

    Regards

    Léonie

  • 2. Re: iPad & Aperture: general workflow suggestions?
    Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6 (11,915 points)

    Well, at least _someone replied .

    leonieDF wrote:

    No answer, Kirby - I am thread-jacking . Which model did you choose? I want to buy one too, but I'll want it for geotagging and navigation, and maybe for browsing images, if I am away from home and do not want to take my 17" laptop along. It is funny - my 13" MBP went with me everywhere, but since I have a 17" model, that is no longer true.

     

    I wonder if it may be possible to go on a week long photo safari with only a camera and an iPad.

    So this thread is now officially completely OT.

     

    I bought the semi-inexpensive one:  black, 32 GB (according to the iPad itself, 28 GB capacity), no 4G.

    - black because photos look better on it.  I prefer the white, but the white plastic has a slight yellow cast, and no one likes to look at face in a greasy collar

    - 32 GB because I knew from my iPhone that 16 wasn't enough, but 32 is.  I don't use it for video or storing music (I subscribe to XM and may subscribe to Pandora or equivalent).  More storage is always better, but I'd rather save the $100.

    - no 4G because I already pay way too much for my iPhone contract, I live in a city (lots of free WiFi), and I have very fast WiFi access at home and at the two places I work.  With iCloud, I only need cellular access on one device, and I already have it on MiPhone.

     

    Obviously, without 4G (or whatever you have over in Euro-land ), you can't do geotagging or navigation.

     

    I recently tested a camera with built-in GPS (Sony a77).  _Very, very_ handy.  I've been adding Aperture Locations by neighborhood, and had become used to that level of granularity -- and am simply giddy with the "This photo was taken in the middle of this block" specificity of the on-camera GPS tagging.

     

    I added a great little keyboard I am happy to recommend: the Adonit Writer+ (for the new iPad -- the old one won't work well).  I touch type, I needed an iPad cover -- and now I have one that includes a BlueTooth keyboard.  Fantastic.  Should I want the iPad naked, it pops out and snaps in in 1s.  The keyboard charge is said to last a year.  So I have an iPad convertible to a netbook.  Did I say "Fantastic"?  I got the red one.

     

    Also in my recommended column: the Wacom stylus for the iPad -- pricey but excellent, once you get used to writing/drawing with rubber on glass -- and the Adonic Jot pen -- the best drawing (not painting, drawing) tool for the iPad.  I draw on MiPad every morning and every evening.  Six hundred years ago artists used pads they prepared with flour (iirc -- haven't looked this up in a long time).  They sketched on them till they were dark with marks, then wiped them clean and put another layer of flour and glue on them.  A great way to learn.  The iPad comes close.

     

    It's an _excellent_ size for light-weight travel.  I lived with a 12" Powerbook for a few years -- still, imho, the best form-factor of any computer ever (CinemaScope® makes sense at room size, but I've never thought it right for paintings, books, or computers) -- the iPad is close to a scaled down version of that screen.  The iPad, in the Adonit cover, fits right in the unused back sleeve of my most used camera bag (ThinkTank Retrospective 20).

     

    But can it substitute for a laptop on a safari?  I don't know -- but having read widely on fitting the iPad into a photography workflow, I can report that most who've tried say "No".  It's certainly an excellent viewer -- I got, and you'll want (and want to include in your budget), the Apple Camera Connection Kit, which consists of two adapters: Applejack to USB, and Applejack to SC card.  Uploading RAW files (I use Sony cameras) works without a hitch.  Editing, adding metadata, or doing any organizing however has to wait until you're back with a real computer.  (OK, you can crop on the iPad, and tart things up with SnapSeed.)  The iPad works well for storage/backup, and for viewing the pictures as shot.  You can email those.  That's it.  If you record JPG only, don't edit, and don't keyword or use other organizing, the iPad will meet your needs.  If you have 6,000 "maven" points in the Apple Aperture discussion forum, you're going to find it more toy than tool.  On the other hand, if you can do without a computer on a safari, it is probably worth its weight to carry along as a viewer.

     

    The screen is delicious.  It's absolutely fantastic for showing photos (if you're OK with showing them on a screen).

     

    I haven't settled on a workflow yet, but I suspect I'll end up syncing a couple of Aperture Smart Folders (wirelessly, btw), possibly via iCloud, showing my "Portfolio" pictures and my "Shot in the last 23 days" pictures. At some point it will be a live camera viewer -- but we're not there yet.

     

    So that's the rundown from Pittsburgh.  Let us know what you decide.  .

  • 3. Re: iPad & Aperture: general workflow suggestions?
    bhaskar_dua Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    For Lightroom users theres a ipad app called Photosmith which makes the iPad nicely fit into the workflow.

     

    Photos can be transferred to the iPad using the camera connection kit and then organised, tagged, rated using the photosmith app. When back home the app syncs directly with Lightroom to transfer all this to the computer without having to repeat the process.

     

    I have been looking for a similar app to complement Aperture since that would make the iPad fit perfectly into my workflow. But no luck so far.

  • 4. Re: iPad & Aperture: general workflow suggestions?
    léonie Level 9 Level 9 (51,645 points)

    So many worthwhile suggestion: Very very helpful, thanks a million! - I want to order the iPad today and nearly forgot about the camera connection kit, the cover, and the wacom stylus. And a cover with keyboard makes it even more attractive to me.

    • The geocoding abilty is very important for me, also the gps for navigation; on my last sailing trip I was very jealous of those who could use their ipad to display the navigational charts anywhere on the ship.
    • Also I want to use the iPad when doing on-site measurements while on an expedition to record the ground truth while the satellites are passing and scanning the area. Our next expedition will be to the Black Sea in summer. A keyboard on the iPad will be very helpful to enter notes quickly. On that occasions we need to shoot raw, right now with a Canon EOS 5D Mark II. Aperture's time zone correction does not work at all with that image format

     

    That's it.  If you record JPG only, don't edit, and don't keyword or use other organizing, the iPad will meet your needs.

    Have you any experience with the iPhoto app on the iPad? Is there any way to get the images out of it again other than the Photo Stream. Can this app do any tagging?

     

    On the other hand, if you can do without a computer on a safari, it is probably worth its weight to carry along as a viewer.

    Well I found out the hard way that I can't do without a computer, when my laptop vanished in march - 14 days without with only a my ipod - it nearly spoiled an otherwise magnificent vacation for me. Now I know exactly what I need to do in the evening when returning to my tent, cabin, or hotel:

    • Download the pictures and browse,
    • Enter important tags while I still remember the circumstances at the moment I took the picture; with the iPad I hope I can use it to do this on the location (with the iPod it turned out not to be feasable)
    • Rigourously delete any images not worth keeping - that is not possible with the tiny display in the camera; is it possible to calibrate the iPad screen so that you can trust the colours? Does the white iPad really cause a yellow tinge ? You are kidding, aren't you?
    • Straighten the horizon (and maybe tentatively crop).
    • Tag the panos to not accidentally delete them as redundant.
    • Decide which pictures to take again the next day, maybe at another hour with different sunlight.

     

    How good is the iPad camera? The iPod camera is a joke - 10 megapixels without the ability to focus or to zoom; the only use I found for it is to take pictures as evidence when I watched an accident, or to get a geocoded picture inside a building where the geo tracker does not receive.

     

    After reading your post I'll put the following in my order:   A black iPad, the camera connection kit, the cover with keyboard, the Wacom stylus, and as much storage as possible (just in case I will start to make movies again, or to try garageBand on the iPad).

     

    I recently tested a camera with built-in GPS (Sony a77).  _Very, very_ handy.

    Does the GPS also record the direction the camera is pointing in? I am not really satisfied with my geotracker. I know my position accurately, but there are many situations where I need the direction as well to find out what the picture shows.

     

    I'll have to be off to work now.

     

    Thanks a lot again!

     

    Cheers

    Léonie

  • 5. Re: iPad & Aperture: general workflow suggestions?
    bhaskar_dua Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    hi Leoni

     

    just a word of caution if the GPS functionality is important for you - make sure to get the WiFi+3G/4G model and not the wifi only model. The 3G/4G has nothing to do with the GPS per se but only those models have a GPS antenna built into them. The wifi only model can do some approximate location sensing using the info from nearby wifi hotspots but i guess you will want something more accurate for your purposes.

  • 6. Re: iPad & Aperture: general workflow suggestions?
    léonie Level 9 Level 9 (51,645 points)

    Thank you, great advice. In the area where we are doing our experiments the wifi coverage will be poor - or not available at all.

  • 7. Re: iPad & Aperture: general workflow suggestions?
    Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6 (11,915 points)

    This strikes me as the kind of application that Apple would be very interested in (it tightly binds and butresses free-standing trees in their orchard).  I'll go out on a branch and say that I'd be surprised if we don't see large upgrades featuring this sort of connectedness, soon.  Let me re-word that:  that would be excellent addition to the Apple farm.  Let's suggest it at "Aperture->Provide Aperture Feedback".  It's not a direct Aperture request, but I suspect the request would end up in the right hands.

     

    (Sent from my magic glass.)

  • 8. Re: iPad & Aperture: general workflow suggestions?
    Shuttleworth125 Level 2 Level 2 (415 points)

    Pixelsync is worth having a look at, but it works the other way round from what you want. You sync photo's to it from Aperture and use it to tag, rate and label your images. It syncs wirelessly to the iPad.

     

    http://www.pixelsyncapp.com/

     

    FWIW I bought a 64GB + "4G", I wanted enopugh space for the bigger apps that are coming out due to the retina display, and to be able to take it away and put some movies on for the kids and also use it with the camera connection kit to backup out photo's .

     

    Apple really need to at least sortout an Aperture assistant app so we can import images from the card, then rate tag and label images while you are away, then sync it back to your mac at home. iPhoto doesn't seem to add any use in this respect, and to be honest the iPad didn;t really neeed anymore photo editing apps.

     

    I was on holiday recently and used my iPhone GPS to record our routes and then import them into Aperture to location tag the photo's. It worked nicely but hammered my phone battery, the iPads much more powerful battery would have been useful on long day trips.

  • 9. Re: iPad & Aperture: general workflow suggestions?
    Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6 (11,915 points)

    Shuttleworth125 wrote:

     

    Apple really need to at least sortout an Aperture assistant app so we can import images from the card, then rate tag and label images while you are away, then sync it back to your mac at home. iPhoto doesn't seem to add any use in this respect, and to be honest the iPad didn;t really neeed anymore photo editing apps.

    +1.  With added ... well, whatever one can add to one's one.

  • 10. Re: iPad & Aperture: general workflow suggestions?
    léonie Level 9 Level 9 (51,645 points)

    At some point it will be a live camera viewer -- but we're not there yet.

    Do you want to do tethered shooting with the iPad, or what do you mean?

     

    I draw on MiPad every morning and every evening.

     

    What app would you recommend for drawing?

     

    Regards

    Léonie