7 Replies Latest reply: May 12, 2012 10:37 PM by petermac87
angel j rodriguez Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

I would like to disable the headphone jack for my mac book pro,

it is a disappointment that this feature is not currently accessible .

Hopefully it will be added with the following os x system software up date.

until then is there anyone that could help me ? please and thank you ...


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.7.3)
  • 1. Re: I would like to disable the headphone jack for my mac book pro, it is a disappointment that this feature is not currently accessible . Hopefully it will be added with the following os x system software up date. until then is there anyone that could he
    petermac87 Level 5 Level 5 (4,205 points)

    angel j rodriguez wrote:

     

    I would like to disable the headphone jack for my mac book pro,

    it is a disappointment that this feature is not currently accessible .

    Hopefully it will be added with the following os x system software up date.

    until then is there anyone that could help me ? please and thank you ...

    I can never recall an opton in Macs to disable the headphone jack, so I am just curious as to why you need this feature added so we can perhaps give you alternatives.

     

    Thank

     

    Pete

  • 2. Re: I would like to disable the headphone jack for my mac book pro, it is a disappointment that this feature is not currently accessible . Hopefully it will be added with the following os x system software up date. until then is there anyone that could he
    ChickenMuffin Level 1 Level 1 (30 points)

    May I ask why?

     

    I ask because if you plug in an intrface or something you have the option to switch from internal output to that interface's output, effectively disabling the headphone jack. I do this all the time when I have my toneport plugged in to play guitar.

     

    Anything from a Griffin iMic to an Apogee Duet and beyond will allow this. I.e. ANY external interface. As to only wanting to use the internal speakers, this seems very bizarre indeed.

  • 4. Re: I would like to disable the headphone jack for my mac book pro, it is a disappointment that this feature is not currently accessible . Hopefully it will be added with the following os x system software up date. until then is there anyone that could he
    softwater Level 5 Level 5 (5,370 points)

    Hold down the 'option' key and click on the 'volume' icon at the top of the screen.

     

    Click

     

    'Use Audio Port for:'

    Input

     

    This will enable your internal speakers to function with the headphone jack still in.

  • 5. Re: I would like to disable the headphone jack for my mac book pro, it is a disappointment that this feature is not currently accessible . Hopefully it will be added with the following os x system software up date. until then is there anyone that could he
    angel j rodriguez Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    i did as you said ,but it doesnt give me an optin of input

    thiers olny digital out an its cheaked under audio port

    how can i make it input ? thanks man for you help

  • 6. Re: I would like to disable the headphone jack for my mac book pro, it is a disappointment that this feature is not currently accessible . Hopefully it will be added with the following os x system software up date. until then is there anyone that could he
    softwater Level 5 Level 5 (5,370 points)

    Hmm, yes, I see the problem. Having looked around the net, there doesn't appear to be a solution to this other than trying to find a way of getting the jack out. None of the solutions I've seen look particularly promising, and even possible dangerous. Here's a summary from

     

     

    http://www.mac-help.com/t6203-headphone-end-broken-off-inside-jack.html

     

    of things people have tried:

     

    1. Bought superglue (the GEL kind, not the liquid), put a dab of it on the end of a toothpick, stuck the toothpick in there and let it sit half an hour. Just pulled it out, and the broken off end of the headphone plug came out with the toothpick perfectly. (It came out so easily, in fact, that I didn't realize it had worked until I looked down at the toothpick and saw the plug still stuck onto it.)


    2. Proceed with caution...

    3. I think the problem with using glue or indeed a magnet is that the jack plug and socket is designed to prevent the plug being removed with very little force. If it was sitting loosely enough to be pulled out with a drop of supergle on a pin or even a magnet, then it would probably be loose enough to fall out if you tipped the device on its side. Ever wondered why your iPod / iRiver / Discman headphones don't fall out constantly? Look at the shape of a jack plug. The shape of the socket mirrors this, so that it gently "latches" when inserted fully.

    4. I think the chances of getting it out with glue are slim-to-none. This is a hole 3.5mm in diameter. Even if you can get a pin or paperclip down onto the broken piece of plug, there won't be enough surface area or glue to obtain a safe bond. And even if it did bond - the gentle "locking" mechanism of the jack socket would probably foil a tiny bond even with the strongest epoxy. If you tried to use more glue, you'd probably end up with a ruined jack socket, and a hefty repair bill.

    5. Without a solid anchor on the piece that is inside the socket, I'd say that opening it up is the only real option. Or, if you're not prepared to do it, getting someone else to do it. The jack socket itself is an incredibly simple design, and once it's exposed you could simply push the end of the plug back out.

    6. The hard drive is actually right next to the headphone jack, so it is a good thing you didn't use a more powerful magnet.


    7. Like I said before, with a really fast drill, like a Dremel, you will be able to make a hole in the broken plug into which you can either force a small screw OR superglue a piece of piano wire and use that to pull the piece out. No, the plug will not rotate since the bit is spinning too fast; however, you have to have a lot of patience and drill in slowly, hence my suggestion of asking an experienced model builder or similar hobbyist. Could I do it? Yes, I have handled problems like this before. Only problem is that I live in another country many thousands of miles away.

    8. It's probably a good idea to take the battery out anyway, to be sure the computer is off and you don't short something.

    9. This is a mechanical problem, insertion of the plug physically disconnects the computer's output from the internal speakers.

    10. If you have a friend who is into scale models, R/C planes or stuff and has the tools (like a Dremel rotary tool), they can try to drill into the stuck plug, force a small screw into the hole and use that to pull the piece out. If no such friend can be found, maybe you can take the Mac to a hobby shop and have them take a look.

    11. I would have her find someone, like a jeweler, to try to extricate the remaining piece of the plug. If that fails, take it to someone who is familiar with laptop computers and can lookup the take-a-part manual on the internet.

    12. The dental pick suggestion is your best bet

  • 7. Re: I would like to disable the headphone jack for my mac book pro, it is a disappointment that this feature is not currently accessible . Hopefully it will be added with the following os x system software up date. until then is there anyone that could he
    petermac87 Level 5 Level 5 (4,205 points)

    softwater wrote:

     

    Hmm, yes, I see the problem. Having looked around the net, there doesn't appear to be a solution to this other than trying to find a way of getting the jack out. None of the solutions I've seen look particularly promising, and even possible dangerous. Here's a summary from

     

     

    http://www.mac-help.com/t6203-headphone-end-broken-off-inside-jack.html

     

    of things people have tried:

     

    1. Bought superglue (the GEL kind, not the liquid), put a dab of it on the end of a toothpick, stuck the toothpick in there and let it sit half an hour. Just pulled it out, and the broken off end of the headphone plug came out with the toothpick perfectly. (It came out so easily, in fact, that I didn't realize it had worked until I looked down at the toothpick and saw the plug still stuck onto it.)


    2. Proceed with caution...

    3. I think the problem with using glue or indeed a magnet is that the jack plug and socket is designed to prevent the plug being removed with very little force. If it was sitting loosely enough to be pulled out with a drop of supergle on a pin or even a magnet, then it would probably be loose enough to fall out if you tipped the device on its side. Ever wondered why your iPod / iRiver / Discman headphones don't fall out constantly? Look at the shape of a jack plug. The shape of the socket mirrors this, so that it gently "latches" when inserted fully.

    4. I think the chances of getting it out with glue are slim-to-none. This is a hole 3.5mm in diameter. Even if you can get a pin or paperclip down onto the broken piece of plug, there won't be enough surface area or glue to obtain a safe bond. And even if it did bond - the gentle "locking" mechanism of the jack socket would probably foil a tiny bond even with the strongest epoxy. If you tried to use more glue, you'd probably end up with a ruined jack socket, and a hefty repair bill.

    5. Without a solid anchor on the piece that is inside the socket, I'd say that opening it up is the only real option. Or, if you're not prepared to do it, getting someone else to do it. The jack socket itself is an incredibly simple design, and once it's exposed you could simply push the end of the plug back out.

    6. The hard drive is actually right next to the headphone jack, so it is a good thing you didn't use a more powerful magnet.


    7. Like I said before, with a really fast drill, like a Dremel, you will be able to make a hole in the broken plug into which you can either force a small screw OR superglue a piece of piano wire and use that to pull the piece out. No, the plug will not rotate since the bit is spinning too fast; however, you have to have a lot of patience and drill in slowly, hence my suggestion of asking an experienced model builder or similar hobbyist. Could I do it? Yes, I have handled problems like this before. Only problem is that I live in another country many thousands of miles away.

    8. It's probably a good idea to take the battery out anyway, to be sure the computer is off and you don't short something.

    9. This is a mechanical problem, insertion of the plug physically disconnects the computer's output from the internal speakers.

    10. If you have a friend who is into scale models, R/C planes or stuff and has the tools (like a Dremel rotary tool), they can try to drill into the stuck plug, force a small screw into the hole and use that to pull the piece out. If no such friend can be found, maybe you can take the Mac to a hobby shop and have them take a look.

    11. I would have her find someone, like a jeweler, to try to extricate the remaining piece of the plug. If that fails, take it to someone who is familiar with laptop computers and can lookup the take-a-part manual on the internet.

    12. The dental pick suggestion is your best bet

    I have seen this first hand. Don't muck around with it. Take it straight into your local Certified Apple Repairer. It is as good as impossible without causing more damage.

     

    Pete