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How can one enter text in this manner?

631 Views 12 Replies Latest reply: Jul 8, 2012 5:16 PM by somanna RSS
somanna Level 1 Level 1 (110 points)
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Jul 7, 2012 1:54 AM

Screen Shot 2012-07-07 at 2.18.35 PM.png

 

Hi to all especially Twill. Loved to see your new movie apparently shot with iphone 4s. Right? I would like to know how to go about and enter text in this lovely manner shown above.

 

Thanks in advance!

 

DR.SOMANNA

iMac, Mac OS X (10.7.4), garage band, FCPX:10.0.5 version
  • Ian R. Brown Level 6 Level 6 (17,495 points)
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    Jul 7, 2012 3:27 AM (in response to somanna)

    Pardon me threadjacking you, but the chap in the other seems to have taken umbrage to our off-point discussion.

     

    Regarding audio, mics and the digital voice recorder.

     

    Camcorder mics generally are very good despite what others may say.

     

    The problem is that as they are on the camera they are likely to pick up motor noise and you can't bring them closer to the subject, so they also pick up lots of ambient noise.

     

    Books have been written about microphone technique but there is only one simple rule  .  .  .  .  get the mic as close to the subject as possible.

     

    This maximises their voice and minimises extraneous sounds.

     

    The usual technique is to connect a normal mic or a lapel/tie-clip/lavalier  mic to the camera via a cable so that the camera records from this mic instead of the internal one.

     

    The cable can be a nuisance and unless you are monitoring the audio you will never know whether the battery in the mic is flat etc. until you discover you have recorded no sound.

     

    To get over the problem of cables and to get even further away, radio mics are used. These transmit the subject's voice to the camera or a receiver.

     

    They also cost a fortune and can be temperamental.

     

    My solution of using a digital voice recorder is the best one for most people.

     

    You can use an external mic plugged into the recorder but I have found that the one on this model is excellent and it's not necessary to use another.

     

    Simply put it near the subject or even in their breast pocket, switch it on and shoot.

     

    Another advantage is that should the recorder ever become faulty you always have the camera's audio track as a backup.

     

    Then import your video and the audio into FCP X, select Synchronise Audio and in a matter of seconds they are all in sync and ready to go.

  • Tom Wolsky Level 10 Level 10 (104,685 points)
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    Jul 7, 2012 9:13 AM (in response to somanna)

    Make a black generator connected to the video. Trim the generator to shape. Put white titles above the black positioned and sized as needed. Select the text and in the video tab apply blend mode silhouette alpha. Select the text layer and the black generator and make them a compound clip.

  • BenB Level 5 Level 5 (7,535 points)
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    Jul 7, 2012 9:15 AM (in response to Ian R. Brown)

    A quality wireless lav will be very stable and would be your best bet.  Saves time having to sync audio.  Most on the market today are very good, the technology is simply "here today" and few, if any, are unstable or "tempermental".  The cheap ones were back in the day, but today they're like audio near field monitors, the technology is simply so advanced there's almost no "bad" ones on the market.  Watch portable mini-audio recorders, many of them have less than stellar preamps and filters in them.

  • Ian R. Brown Level 6 Level 6 (17,495 points)
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    Jul 7, 2012 11:22 AM (in response to somanna)

    I bought the item as I might need it in the future and tested it immediately.

     

    However, I have trashed the results.

     

    In my shirt pocket there was no hint of a heartbeat but when I moved around an horrific crackling sound was heard as the rather crinkly material rubbed against it.

     

    There were 2 cures for this:-

     

    1. Check the shirt material, pad out the mic or otherwise clip it firmly.

     

    2. Use a lavalier mic connected to it.

     

    If you were filming a group you would position it on something amidst them  .  .  .  .  .  not on a body.

     

    Needless to say, after the initial test I have never used it again  .  .  .  .  .  but maybe some day.

  • Karsten Schlüter Level 7 Level 7 (29,465 points)
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    Jul 8, 2012 1:41 AM (in response to Tom Wolsky)

    Tom Wolsky wrote:

    … and make them a compound clip.

    arrghgh ... missed that step!

     

    tried all kind of layering & composite modes … - THAT simple!

     

    great advice!

    btw a blazing fast method to create a 'stylish' lower-third

    (in this case: a rightish-third )

  • EV3media Calculating status...
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    Jul 8, 2012 2:15 AM (in response to somanna)

    Hi Dr. Somanna,

     

    I shot that video with the iPad 3rd generation using a Makayama movie mount and attached .5x wide angle lense.

     

    Thank you Tom for explaining the technique... You beat me too it!

  • Ian R. Brown Level 6 Level 6 (17,495 points)
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    Jul 8, 2012 3:37 AM (in response to somanna)

    If you have problems with scripts or song sheets rustling and being picked up by the microphone, you can spray them with a fine mist of water which will dampen not only the paper but the rustling as well.

     

    Of course, if the song sheets are priceless originals you may prefer not to wet them. 

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