9 Replies Latest reply: Jul 23, 2012 3:35 PM by Tom Wolsky
Smallsss Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Hi,

 

I'm hoping someone could help me retain the best quality possible for my video while working on projects because whatever I'm doing now is not working.

I shoot with a Sony HDR-FX1000 in HDV 1080i/24p and the picture and quality is amazing when plugged into a TV or played back on the camera LCD screen.  I use a new iMac 2.7GHz Intel Core i5, Mac OS X 10.7.4 to edit.  However, when I import into my new FCP X it is not as crisp and quality, and then when I export, it is definitely not the quality I imagined.  The video loses it's sharpness and it gets very noisy plus fuzzy lines appear in some areas of shots.  These lines don't show up when I view my edited footage in the timeline, only after exporting.  I'm fairly new to this all and know I'm not using the best settings to retain the most quality because the beginning and end quality look very different. 

 

I don't do heavy duty editing or effects at the moment.  Basic color correction, slow-motion, preset effects, transitions, music and titles.

ANY help relating to what my settings should be across the board to retain the best image possible is greatly appreciated.  I can't seem to figure it out with trial and error anymore and thought I'd turn to the experts for help.

 

Thanks!

 

Smalls


Final Cut Pro X, Mac OS X (10.7.4)
  • 1. Re: Import/Export to retain best quality for a Beginner
    Tom Wolsky Level 10 Level 10 (106,175 points)

    The camera viewscreen is useless as a quality guide.

     

    Make sure the project properties match exactly your media properties. Check in the inspector. Make srue playback is set to high quality rather than better performance if you have to see high quality while editing. Also set the viewer in the upper right to show both fields to see interlacing.

     

    What are you shooting 1080i or 1080p. Does this camera record true 1080p24 or does it use pulldown?

     

    Signals scanned at 24p/30p are converted to 60i (using 2-3 pulldown for 24p)

     

    There's the answer to the last question.

     

    Message was edited by: Tom Wolsky

  • 2. Re: Import/Export to retain best quality for a Beginner
    Smallsss Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thank you for the response.  Correct, it uses pulldown for 24p.  What should I have my format, resolution and rate set to in this case?  I was also hoping to get some feedback on the settings for importing footage such as transcoding, proxy media, etc?  I also must be doing something wrong when exporting because these fuzzy, distorted lines show up in certain shots of the video that weren't present in the viewer while editing and playing back.  Any thoughts?  Again, I appreciate the feedback!

  • 3. Re: Import/Export to retain best quality for a Beginner
    Tom Wolsky Level 10 Level 10 (106,175 points)

    Make a new project and edit a clip into the timeline. That will set the project properties. It's most likely 1080i29.97.

     

    Why are you trying to transcode? HDV file size is pretty small. There is no real benefit in using proxy media. If your computer is too slow to process native HDV then you might have to. The media is already in an optimized form.

     

    Please post screen shots. Need to know exactly how you're exporting and where you're seeing the problem.

     

    Did you set the viewer to show both fields?

  • 4. Re: Import/Export to retain best quality for a Beginner
    Smallsss Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I've set the viewer to both fields.  I guess I don't know why I was transcoding.  I thought it somehow optimized the video.  Could part of the reason the quality drops be because I transcoded the video when I didn't need to?

     

    When I export, these are the settings I use and then export to QuickTime.

    Screen Shot 2012-07-22 at 4.38.13 PM.png

     

    Here is an example of the noise and lines that show up after exporting the video.

    Screen Shot 2012-07-22 at 4.32.12 PM.png

     

    It's not like this in the viewer while editing EXCEPT when I change playback quality to High Quality.  Any idea why?

     

    Also, these are my settings when importing the video.  What should be changed other than deselected the Transcoding options?

    Screen Shot 2012-07-22 at 5.38.29 PM.png

     

    I really appreciate the input.  Thanks!

  • 5. Re: Import/Export to retain best quality for a Beginner
    Tom Wolsky Level 10 Level 10 (106,175 points)

    You are exporting to a compressed format. High quality playback will show you the material as accurately as the computer can. You're seeing combing caused by interlacing. That because you're shooting an interlaced format designed for display on a television set and not on a computer screen.

     

    What does the inspector say for clip information exactly? What does it say for project information?

     

    You shouldn't really turn on any of those preferences when importing from tape, except for the first two, so anything you import with drag and drop will use those settings.

  • 6. Re: Import/Export to retain best quality for a Beginner
    Smallsss Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    This is what the inspector says for the clip info.  I'm not sure why it would give those settings when the camera is set to shoot HDV 1080i/24p....I've tried project settings at 1080iHD 1280x1080 29.97i and NTSC 720x480 29.97fps and neither seem to differ in quality too much.  Still have the combing issue which I would like to get rid of.

    Screen Shot 2012-07-22 at 10.34.40 PM.png

     

    How do I solve the 'combing' issue?  Is that a setting change on the camera or FCPX?  On my camera I have the options of recording HDV 1080i or DV, 30p or 24p, and setting component to 480i or 1080i/480i (I'm not sure the difference).  I was under the impression HDV 1080i @ 24p would be the best, most cinematic quality and that is what I've recording my footage in.

     

    Any suggestions?  Thanks so much for the help.

  • 7. Re: Import/Export to retain best quality for a Beginner
    Tom Wolsky Level 10 Level 10 (106,175 points)

    Either you shot in DV and didn't realize it or the camera was set to downconvert on playback. The camera is drsigned to shoot in an interlaced format. With this camera your best course is to shoot and edit interlaced. Then depending on where you're going with your finished output, deinterlace the finished file for delivery. If you're going to play your finished video on TV don't deinterlace.

  • 8. Re: Import/Export to retain best quality for a Beginner
    Smallsss Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    My main goal is to make videos that will either be uploaded to youtube and vimeo and to make lengthier videos that could be burned to a DVD (full length documentary).  If my best course is to shoot and edit in interlaced but deinterlace the finished file for delivery, how do I go about keeping the footage interlaced while importing and editing and then deinterlacing the video afterwards?  Are there additional apps that will make this all easier for me?  As you can tell, I'm an amateur.  I don't plan on playing the finished video on a TV unless it was being played from a DVD.

     

    This is all very new to me and I'm coming from Final Cut Express where I somehow didn't run into these problems as much, but I appreciate any help because I can use all I can get.

     

    Thanks

  • 9. Re: Import/Export to retain best quality for a Beginner
    Tom Wolsky Level 10 Level 10 (106,175 points)

    The same problems were in FCE even if you didn't see them there. You can use JES Deinterlacer if you want to go to DVD and make a deinterlaced DVD. Most compression for the web will automatically deinterlace. If your video was downconverted in the camera on playback this can be a problem as well because the interlacing is scaled.