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WPA 2 network?

862 Views 16 Replies Latest reply: Jul 23, 2012 2:24 PM by Stema001 RSS
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Stema001 Level 1 Level 1 (110 points)
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Jul 23, 2012 5:09 AM

"WPA2 requires a Mac computer with an AirPort Extreme Card and OS X v10.3 or later." (see: http://www.apple.com/airportexpress/specs/ -> Point 2)

 

What does this means? Can I create a WPA 2 network with my MacBook Pro (early 2011)? I don't understand this card thing. Is this something I need to buy to create a WPA 2 network?

 

O.o

MacBook Pro (13-inch Early 2011), Mac OS X (10.7.4)
  • wuzradioman Level 4 Level 4 (2,125 points)
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    Jul 23, 2012 6:42 AM (in response to Stema001)

    Stema,

     

    Absolutely,  your machine is certainly WPA2 capable.  Actually, you'll be using WPA2 personal. (There is a WPA2 enterprise for business networks.)  BTW WPA2 is the latest and best option for home networks.

    Your computer does have the appropriate wi fi card installed.

  • wuzradioman Level 4 Level 4 (2,125 points)
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    Jul 23, 2012 7:56 AM (in response to Stema001)

    Hello Stema,

     

    You may be a bit confused by the requirements (understandible.)  It may be that you are saying Airport Extreme card when you actually mean Airport Utility. Airport Utility is an Apple application that can be downloaded, free. It should already be in your computer, although, it may need updating.  If you purchase the Airport Express, you will get an installation disk which will walk you through the proccess of setting it up.

    With regards to your computer, it has all the neccessary ingredients to work with the Airport Express and other wifi networks, including the wi fi card. 

  • wuzradioman Level 4 Level 4 (2,125 points)
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    Jul 23, 2012 11:14 AM (in response to Stema001)

    Yes, indeed -- this does include WPA2 Personal.  Some very old versions of computer type devices don't have

    WPA2 cabability, but they will be few and very far between.  I have an Airport Express in my network to handle wireless devices that I have in my home --including an older ipod, a blu-ray player that we use to stream movies, and a bunch of guests who use smart phones ipad, i pods, all without difficulty.

    The Express is a very good wi fi product, and I'm sure just about anyone on this site would advise you to use WPA2 security.  So I think you're a smart cookie to go that route. 

  • wuzradioman Level 4 Level 4 (2,125 points)
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    Jul 23, 2012 1:35 PM (in response to Stema001)

    Hi Stema,

     

    My Isp speed is 15mbps, they do offer an upgrade to 50mbps but it costs 50 percent more per month.  They do have a fiber optic network for business which must be quite a bit faster and a lot more expensive, but I don't know anything about that service. For me 15 mbps is sufficient.

     

    The advantages of the Airport Extreme over the Express are: more ethernet ports and higher speed capability.

    You don't need the extra ethernet lan ports.  You can't make use of the extra speed.

    The Extreme no longer has the advantage of simultaneouse dual band operation, because the new Express has it now.

     

    The Express cost  79 USD LESS than the Extreme.

    I think that it is very easy to conclude that the Express is well suited for your network configuration.

  • Bob Timmons Level 9 Level 9 (75,460 points)
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    Jul 23, 2012 1:40 PM (in response to Stema001)

    I don't understand why Gigabit excists...

    I have a MacBook connected to the AirPort Extreme using the Gigabit Ethernet ports and I have a Time Capsule that connects using Gigabit Ethernet ports.

     

    When I want to backup the hard drive on my Mac to the Time Capsule, the backup goes much faster using Gigabit (1,000 Mpbs) compared to normal 100 Mbps.

     

    The backup goes 10 times faster using Gigabit. That is why Gigabit exists.

  • Bob Timmons Level 9 Level 9 (75,460 points)
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    Jul 23, 2012 2:06 PM (in response to Stema001)

    Another example.

     

    You have an AirPort Express that will produce a 5 GHz wireless network at 300 Mbps.

     

    You add a second AirPort Express in another part of the house because you need more wireless coverage.

     

    You connect both AirPort Express devices using an Ethernet cable.

     

    The second AirPort Express wireless is working at 300 Mpbs, but when it sees the Ethernet port, the speed drops to 100 Mbps.

     

    It this does not bother you, buy the AirPort Express....but do not attempt to connect a hard drive to the AirPort Express because it will not work.

     

    If you want to use a shared hard drive with the AirPort, your only option would be the AirPort Extreme.

  • Bob Timmons Level 9 Level 9 (75,460 points)
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    Jul 23, 2012 2:28 PM (in response to Stema001)

    I have both an AirPort Extreme and AirPort Express and the antennas in the Extreme are definitely superior to the antenna(s) in the Express.

     

    I suggest that you ask the store if you can return the Express if you are not satisfied.

     

    If you are, that is great. If not, you can get the AirPort Extreme.

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