5 Replies Latest reply: Oct 12, 2012 2:29 AM by The hatter
Forrest Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

I have 4 old SCSI drives that were in a Windows system that I want to mount and possibly extract (copy) some files and data.   I have a powered IDE/SATA to USB device here, but I've not seen anything that will do SCSI.    Do I need to buy a simple SCSI to IDE bridge -- would that even work?

 

I am running Mountain Lion, latest update.

 

Thanks!


Mac Pro, Mac OS X (10.7)
  • 1. Re: SCSI to IDE adapter to mount on OS X?
    The hatter Level 9 Level 9 (58,885 points)

    What SCSI standard? There was the Ratoc FW to SCSI useful for UW tape, scanners and very old 50-pin and with some adapters. Were getting to be problematic and no longer easy to find.

     

    I have a couple X58 PCs that have PCI-X slot but have not tried to use say ATTO UL3S and others. PCIe SCSI are expensive. But should work with PCI/PCI-X.

     

    Extract on the PC. There are HFS+ drivers from Paragon and MacDrive is a good one, or NTFS drivers for OS X that mount and have better ability and luck to copy even from external drives.

     

    the PC can't? Don't see why you can't do it on Windows machine and put it on a FW/USB drive.

  • 2. Re: SCSI to IDE adapter to mount on OS X?
    Forrest Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    These were in an older windows system, circa late 90's or so -- the drives are Fujitsu an I'm guessing it's SCSI II.   There are four of them, screwed in to a disk chassis (which I'll derail at some point).  

     

    I have a spare Ubunto system here that I'm upgrading, I might have better luck mounting them there, once I figure out how to convert the adapter connection to USB, or to IDE (I have an IDE/USB drive connector already).

     

    I believe the SCSI controller is Adaptec.

  • 3. Re: SCSI to IDE adapter to mount on OS X?
    Grant Bennet-Alder Level 8 Level 8 (49,285 points)

    You keep tossing off "SCSI to IDE Bridge" as if that is something you can just go out and buy. I don't think so.

     

    In their heyday, SCSI drives were more expensive but much higher performance. There was never a desire to take excellent SCSI drives and dumb them down to IDE. There would have been no market for such a device. But there were computers (including Macs) that accepted SCSI PCI Cards.

     

    You need a computer with a SCSI card. A computer that has PCI slots can accept an older adapter that can be had for very cheap. There is no simple adapter that can convert to IDE.

     

    An adapter card for PCIe for your current computer costs about US$500.

  • 4. Re: SCSI to IDE adapter to mount on OS X?
    Forrest Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    I do?  Did you take a minute to type in  "SCSI to IDE Bridge" in Google? 

     

    Anyhow, I have actually used one of these many years ago... had mixed results, but I believe it worked.  The solution you suggest of course is the better one -- the card and case I still have; both are good.. I'll look into that as well.

     

    Thanks.

  • 5. Re: SCSI to IDE adapter to mount on OS X?
    The hatter Level 9 Level 9 (58,885 points)

    Some PATA controllers show up as or using SCSI IO protocol.  But pure IDE.

     

    Adaptec, ATTO controllers sitting around, from PCI PowerMac and NuBus never seen anything, not on MacGurus that turned me on to UL3S in its day, seen 25 or 50-pin to IDE, PATA - or SATA. Only 68-pin to 50-pin. FirmTek did a lot on ATA and controllers and firmware. And had various products.

     

    Http://www.firmtek.com

     

    If there is was would have been on GraniteDigital

    www.granitedigital.com/ideproducts.aspx

     

    The first SATA drives were PATA with a Marvel bridge to provide the SATA interface. Built into the PCB. Translating SCSI into IDE ?

     

    As I said above, Firewire interface with SCSI like Ratoc was, and $90, but people last yr had trouble now with them. Need OS 9 maybe.

     

    There may have, never saw one, and I still have drives, cases, $200 cable and $75 active term.

     

    As you said, results were mixed.