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How do I get a high resolution pdf version of my pages document?

11977 Views 62 Replies Latest reply: Jan 7, 2014 7:40 PM by PeterBreis0807 RSS
  • damin1 Calculating status...

    ...and how did you "change the DPI to 300" (assuming you are still in Pages software?)

  • thedvguy Calculating status...

    this is really weird.

    In Apple Pages, when I went to - save as PDF, there was a pull down menu that allowed me to choose the DPI.

    I chose 300 DPI, saved and sent the file

    the person I sent the file to said it was only 150 DPI

    I went to do it again, and that little pull down menu is gone

    I cannot figure out how to change the DPI

    I ended up sending them the original pieces and letting them recreate the ad, using a lower res jpeg as a template

    if anyone knows what happened here, I'd really like to know

  • thedvguy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    just FYI

    since Pages only allows me to export as a PDF

    I opened the PDF in Preview and saved as a jpeg

  • Walt K Level 4 Level 4 (2,895 points)

    Here is a more detailed procedure than what I wrote earlier. It was devised before Save as … disappeared and then returned, so anyone using Lion or Mountain Lion will have to "translate."

     

    To achieve 300 dpi resolution in drop shadows, open the ColorSync utility Filters and duplicate the Create Generic PDFX-3 Document filter. In the copy, click on the arrow to the left to open the drop-down. Then click on the next arrow, Create PDF/X-3 Document. Enter 300 in each of the boxes labeled Resolution. Save it with a new name.

     

    When you want a 300 resolution PDF, go Print > PDF > Open in Preview > Save as… >  Quartz  > New Name filter > Save. (Do not use Export.)

     

    Using this filter will give you 300 dpi resolution in drop shadows and other transparencies.

     

    Walt

  • thedvguy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I tried these instructions

    I had a hard time changing the name of the new PDF/X-3 file

    it just duplicated with the word copy on the end

    I typed in a new name, but it wouldn't stick

     

    I output a PDF and then saved it as a jpeg

    the jpeg is still 150 dpi

  • Walt K Level 4 Level 4 (2,895 points)

    Then just make a note that the "Copy" is the 300 ppi version. Why make life complicated?

     

    Walt

  • thedvguy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    if naming were the only problem that would be fine

    you failed to note that the final result was still 150 DPI

    I need 300 DPI

    I used the new one labeled copy

    I would like to give it a better name

    but, mostly, I'd like it to work

  • Walt K Level 4 Level 4 (2,895 points)

    What was the PPI of the original document? This change affects only the transparency.

  • thedvguy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I'm looking for a way to make a 300DPI document.

    why is that so hard?

  • Walt K Level 4 Level 4 (2,895 points)

    If you want 300 ppi resolution of your (bitmap) images, they must be 300 when you insert them. For the vector parts, resolution is immaterial.

     

    That's not hard.

  • thedvguy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    so, how do you output a 300 DPI PDF from Pages?

  • Henrik Holmegaard Level 3 Level 3 (575 points)

    Walt wrote:

    > If you want 300 ppi resolution of your (bitmap) images, they must be 300 when you insert them. For the vector parts, resolution is immaterial. That's not hard.

     

    Actually, it is.

     

    1. To check the resolution of a TIFF or JPEG file (one image, one file), start Apple Preview and select Tools > Get Info. This will show the resolution, the colourant format (RGB, CMY, CMYK ...), the colourimetry specification (either unspecified deviceColor or specified by ICC source profile).

     

    2. To check the resolution of a PDF or EPS file (one or more images and other objects, one file), there is no human interface in Mac OS X that lets you look at the object-oriented metainformation. You have to have third party software, and you have to have a working knowledge of the Adobe imaging architecture.

     

    As I wrote above in this thread, it is not correct that the ColorSync Utility will always render transparency resolution at 72dpi. Transparency was introduced in Mac OS 7.5 for QuickDraw GX in 1994 and reintroduced in Mac OS X for Quartz in 2000, so it's nothing new in the screen imaging system.

     

    However, getting from the programming operators for resolution-independent transparency in the screen imaging system to the resolution-dependency of a RIP using the Adobe imaging architecture has been a problem for eighteen years, which is a little short of the time I've spent writing in this neck of the IT woods.

     

    PDF/X-4 supports live transparency (and layers), but a test in 2012 suggested that there is still trouble sorting out how live transparency should be rendered. PDF/X-3 does not support live transparency: you have to pre-render to the resolution of the intended printing condition (which you have to know, of course).

     

    Finally, if you choose the PDF/X filter in the ColorSync Utility, you are informing the system that you want to save a ColorWorld complete with the ICC profile for the intended printing condition. Here you have to know what that profile is, which may or may not be the default profile offered by the default filter.

     

    The current default profile came about after an argument between the ColorSync Users List and ColorSync engineering. On the List, we wanted a change from a default profile for the Apple Color LaserWriter to a default profile for a genuinely common printing condition.

     

    Apple engineering then chose US SWOP as the common printing condition to which new drawing in CMYK mode as well as unmarked/untagged drawing in CMYK and drawing in CMYK mode for PDF/X would conform. However, what you buy when you buy print is by and large gamut, so if you are buying print, check if the gamut you are buying is bigger than the gamut of US SWOP, because if you send the printer PDF/X with US SWOP as OutputIntent, you have declared that you want to reduce the gamut to US SWOP regardless of the gamut the printer is offering you.

     

    It's like choosing to write in 7-bit US ASCII = the Basic Latin Block of ISO-IEC 10646. The size of the input writing space determines what you can send, irrespective of the size of the reference/connection space and the size of the receiving/output space. You can't write Russian, because Cyrillic is far out of gamut for US ASCII. This is simple set theory, and the gamut comparison in the ColorSync Utility can be used to check the size of the writing/working space relative to the size of the space for which you select a receiving/output profile in the ColorSync Utility.

     

    Hope this helps,

    Henrik

  • Jeff Shenk Level 4 Level 4 (2,000 points)

    If you place a 300 dpi image in Pages, it will be output at 300 dpi (as long as there are no shadows or transparency overlapping vector objects).

     

    If you are getting 150 dpi, that's because you put a 150 dpi image into your document.

     

    (And, Henrik, that really isn't hard.)

  • thedvguy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    this is really a simple question that you are complicating beyond belief.

    if I create a page in PAGES and output that page as a PDF, can that PDF be 300 DPI?

    I am not putting an image in. I am creating a document and exporting as a PDF

    then opening in Preview and saving as a JPEG

    this is a simple process to get a hi res JPEG image to the printer

    why is that so complicated?

  • Henrik Holmegaard Level 3 Level 3 (575 points)

    > this is really a simple question that you are complicating beyond belief.

    > why is that so complicated?

     

    Well, if you want to drive a car, if you don't know about gears, clutches, and brakes, if you ask for informed advice, and if you are informedly advised of gears, clutches, and brakes, perhaps it's not the best approach to publish that you consider information about how to guide your vehicle on the road to be ... well, idiotically complicated -:). You would perhaps be better advised to listen, get hold of a book or two, and learn.

     

    > if I create a page in PAGES and output that page as a PDF, can that PDF be 300 DPI?

    > I am not putting an image in. I am creating a document and exporting as a PDF

    > then opening in Preview and saving as a JPEG

    > this is a simple process to get a hi res JPEG image to the printer

     

    Sigh, Adobe PDF has no resolution per se. By definition, PDF, and PostScript from which it derives, is a co-ordinate space defined in two duodecissimal systems, US inches and US pica-points. Vector objects you define in the co-ordinate space also don't have a resolution per se, as Walt told you above.

     

    In the page design phase, resolution comes into the picture for imported photographs. Here, if you don't place the right resolution in your originating application, in this case Pages, you don't magically get the right resolution in PDF (or PostScript, or PCL, or XPS ...).

     

    Resolution also comes into the page design phase for a special class of vector-like objects in PDF 1.4 and higher, namely transparencies which may involve resolution-independent vector objects, resolution-dependent raster objects, or any combination of the two.

     

    When you place a photograph for an album cover, write a title for the album on top of the photography, and apply a transparency to dim the busy photograph sufficiently that you reader is able to catch your title without studying it closely, then you have a combination of vector and raster objects in the transparency.

     

    The PDF/X filter in the ColorSync Utility exists for two main reasons, (1) it lets you choose the ICC colour space conversion profile for the printing condition, and, (2) it lets you choose the resolution at which transparencies will be rendered when the PDF is created, not when it is consumed in the RIP.

     

    I should probably write to advise you not to convert from PDF into JPEG, because JPEG looses detail by definition. I should probably write to advise you to choose the default TIFF format because it does not loose detail. But you would say that I am making things idiotically complicated.

     

    Perhaps, by way of closing, you would tell us why you want to export from PDF to JPEG, and to JPEG at 150DPI to boot? I may have missed something, but I believe you and your printer wanted 300DPI?

     

    Believe me, I appreciate that you find computing to be complicated. It is, as all agree. But it you approach the challenge in the belief that knowledge is needless, then you will find help only among the angels -:).

     

    Best,

    Henrik

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