12 Replies Latest reply: Nov 10, 2012 7:46 PM by etresoft
cruisinto Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

I have spent hours googling and trying to apply various scripts to get the drive mounted with NFS with no success.

 

I am looking for a step by step guide on how to mount my network drive in laymens as my experience with script is limited:

 

I have successfully mounted my network drive using afp://192.168.2.122 however it has limitations and I am looking for an auto mount nfs for the drive.

 

Drive: Dlink DNS 320 linix Raid1 drive

Drive setup to accept: NFS

IP address: 192.168.2.122

Volume: Volume_1

workgroup: msheimnetz

Name: CRUISINTORAID

 

Any advice greatly appreciated.

  • 1. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    etresoft Level 7 Level 7 (24,270 points)

    Have you tried using AutoFS?

  • 2. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    cruisinto Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Tried to Follow AutoFS. Found the folder /etc/ found the file auto_master

     

    However....  my knowledge of coding is not enough to manipulate the commands alonre to suit my needs.

     

     

    Secondly the disk utility that they mention in the white paper is no longer available in Mountain lion

  • 3. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (117,870 points)
  • 4. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    cruisinto Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    I have been able to mount the drive with the following command in finders connect to server however the mount appears to be very very very very slow and lasts about 20 seconds before !!SERVER CONNECTION INTERUPTED!! and dismounted. 

     

    nfs://192.168.2.122/mnt/HD/HD_a2

     

    found "mnt/HD/HD_a2" on the netwrk shares information on the network drive. also gave me a host IP address of 192.168.2.139. Not sure how that relates as the IP address for the drive is 192.168.2.122

  • 5. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    cruisinto Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Looks like we are getting closer.

     

    The trial version allowed me to manually mount the network drive and yes it appears to be stable and appears as a mounted shared folder in finder HOWEVER!!!

     

    Whenever I open the mount a finder page opens and it takes about 4 minutes to show the file directory. I click on a folder and it takes another 5 minutes to open a folder. Literally.

     

    I have read in forums that NFS can be slow in Mac environments however this is extrordinarily slow and unworkable. Am I missing something with the 'NFS Manager'?

  • 6. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (117,870 points)

    That would be a problem with the NFS server, or the network. NFS is far from being a core feature of OS X, and the implementation may not be compatible with your server. The developer of NFS Manager is much more knowledgable about the subject than I am. You could try emailing him.

  • 7. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    cruisinto Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    It is unlikely to be the network as the afp://192.168.2.122 connection works at lightnening speed.

     

    Will try an email to see if there is a Solution from the NFS manager developer although based on my own attempts to mount using the line nfs://192.168.2.122/mnt/HD/HD_a2 in Finders Connect to server appears to produce a similar result. So is this a Dlink problem? a Network issue? or a Mac issue?... or as you suggested a software issue from NFS manager?

  • 8. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    etresoft Level 7 Level 7 (24,270 points)

    cruisinto wrote:

     

    It is unlikely to be the network as the afp://192.168.2.122 connection works at lightnening speed.

    So why not use that?

     

    As far as I know NFS Manager is just a front end. All of the actual connections use the build-in network logic. NFS is an old, stable, and fast protocol. If it is horribly slow on your machine then it is horribly misconfigured on the server. Is this a Dlink NAS device? I doubt you will be able to fix it. If you have a fast, usable connection with AFP, stick with that. It will be more "native" than NFS anyway.

  • 9. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    cruisinto Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Problem with the afp://192.168.2.122 connection is that it does frequently dismount and I tried to make a file transfer using testdisk using the afp:// and found through a bit of trial and error that files larger that 700mb will hang and there is also the annoyancy of it constantly dismounting and having to manually mount it again through finder / connect to server. Not sure how all the above plays together but thought I'd try to find a more stable mount than the afp:// to make my data restore a little easier.

     

    This all came aout after a RAID failure and now I am sitting in ROOT using testdisk to recover files from a RAID 1 drive back to a clean RAID 1 network drive. I have 3 tb of data to go and trying to streamline it. Due to the limitations of the afp:// I am looking for the best solution.

     

    And yes it is a 'Dlink DNS 320'  NAS device

  • 10. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (117,870 points)

    Problem with the afp://192.168.2.122 connection is that it does frequently dismount and I tried to make a file transfer using testdisk using the afp:// and found through a bit of trial and error that files larger that 700mb will hang and there is also the annoyancy of it constantly dismounting and having to manually mount it again through finder / connect to server.

     

    Then the server certainly does have issues.

  • 11. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    cruisinto Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Server or Dlink?

  • 12. Re: Mount NFS for Linux network drive for Mountain Lion
    etresoft Level 7 Level 7 (24,270 points)

    cruisinto wrote:

     

    Server or Dlink?

    They are the same. These NAS devices use some flaky version of Linux and an even more flaky AFP server called Netatalk. Its NFS implementation may be more robust, but it obviously slower due to misconfiguration. Your options seems limited with that device.