4 Replies Latest reply: Nov 20, 2012 6:39 AM by g_wolfman
OPEDinMV Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

At times, I have over 50 outgoing tracking connections via safari, and I think it slows down my computer.  Is this normal, and can I limit this?  I tried blocking them but eventually I couldn't access the search engines, eg. google.  I think this is excessive and should be limited, and some of the links look redundant to me.  Is this normal activity?


MAC, Mac OS X (10.5.8), Dual 2.5 GHz PPC G5 5 GB DDR SDRAM
  • 1. Re: safari outgoing connections over 50.  Is this normal?
    CT Level 6 Level 6 (15,535 points)

    How do you determine the number of "outgoing tracking connections"?

  • 2. Re: safari outgoing connections over 50.  Is this normal?
    OPEDinMV Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I have Norton Firewall which tracks ingoing & outgoing connections.  It informs me of the total number of connections, in and out, separately.  BTW, I also recently queried Symantec/Norton MAC Communities about this topic and they replied it is normal traffic and that I should expect reduntant listings and lots (their example was greater than 50) of outgoing connections via Safari while I'm using the internet, and not to be worried about this finding.  Thanks.

  • 3. Re: safari outgoing connections over 50.  Is this normal?
    CT Level 6 Level 6 (15,535 points)

    My recommendation for what it is worth:  If you are concerned about computer performance, dump all that Norton stuff. You don't need it and it doesn't work very well on the mac.

     

    charlie

  • 4. Re: safari outgoing connections over 50.  Is this normal?
    g_wolfman Level 4 Level 4 (1,120 points)

    Every webpage (unless it is really old and poorly built) contains all kinds of embedded links, images, scripts and other content.  Every one of those embedded elements exists at its own URI.  When you open a web page, your browser gets the contents of the page, which includes all those embedded element URIs - which means that the browser then has to go and fetch each of them in order to be able to display them in the page when it is rendered in your web browser.

     

    So yes, every time you open a web page, there will be a flurry of other connections - and the richer the content of the page you are loading, the more additional connections will be required to get all of its content.

     

    Now I've never used Norton, so I can't really comment on it except to say that it appears to have a well-earned low reputation vis-a-vis Macs...but regardless of what security tools (if any) you use, trying to monitor HTTP connections while you are actively web browsing is going to be a collosal waste to time.