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Compressor: HDV to MPEG 2 / 2006 vs. 2012??

356 Views 9 Replies Latest reply: Nov 20, 2012 12:57 PM by Ben Low RSS
Ben Low Level 1 Level 1 (45 points)
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Nov 18, 2012 6:19 PM

A client has come back for a new master of her film, shot in HDV in 2006 - mastered to HDV, then to MPEG2 via Compressor.

 

I'm wondering if anything has happened to Compressor since 2006 ... or to the MPEG2 codec ... maybe this is impossible, but has there been any improvement in the codec since then?  Might I be able to get a better new MPEG2 by redoing the HDV to MPEG2?

 

 

All ears,

 

 

Ben

MacBook Pro (15-inch Glossy), Mac OS X (10.6.8)
  • Russ H Level 6 Level 6 (12,880 points)
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    Nov 18, 2012 6:59 PM (in response to Ben Low)

    Ben Low wrote:

     

    A client has come back for a new master of her film, shot in HDV in 2006 - mastered to HDV, then to MPEG2 via Compressor.

    It's not clear (to me anyway) what the objective is. To begin, HDV is a type of MPEG2. Is the MPEG2 you're referring to a DVD encode? If so, you may be able to improve upon what was done originally. There are people here who could help you with the best workflow and settings.

     

    If it's the original movie you want to remaster, my question would be, what specific issues are you trying to fix (like color balance, noise, audio, etc.)?

     

    Russ

  • Russ H Level 6 Level 6 (12,880 points)
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    Nov 19, 2012 5:16 AM (in response to Ben Low)

    Ben,

     

    There are several things you might do to improve an MPEG2 encode; a lot depends on the content (movement, details, lighting, graphics, etc) so what works great for one project may not do much of anything for another.

     

    One step that can make a difference in going from HD to SD resolution is to turn on Frame Controls and set the Resize Filter to Best.

     

    As for adjusting bit rates, I doubt you would see much difference in going much above 7 Mbps. But what you might try (on a section of challenging material) is comparing CBR to VBR.

     

    Consider first transcoding from HDV to Pro Res 442 and then doing the MPEG2 encode. I've had some HDV>DVD projects that have gone without a hitch…but also enough have not so that I just routinely convert everything to Pro Res. Again, I'd try a short section to keep the testing times down.

     

    Finally, although there are amazing looking DVD's, people are often disappointed when they see their gorgeous high def movie in the highly compressed SD format. If Blu-Ray is an option, give that a try. It can be done from within Compressor – albeit with a basic menu. Or, if the movie is under about 30 minutes, you could burn an AVCHD disk with a regular optical drive which will play in most Blu Ray players.

     

    Good luck.

     

    Russ

  • Michael Grenadier Level 6 Level 6 (19,800 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 19, 2012 6:58 AM (in response to Ben Low)

    no improvement in codec, but if the best techniques as outlined by Russ were not used, you may be able to do a better job.  Why not try it and see.

  • Michael Grenadier Level 6 Level 6 (19,800 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 20, 2012 12:48 PM (in response to Ben Low)

    I was responding to your " I was just wondering if a codec sometimes gets a tweak over the years (by its masters) ." 

     


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