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SSD drive in a Mac Pro mid 2010?

1242 Views 9 Replies Latest reply: Feb 23, 2013 10:43 AM by The hatter RSS
Galimathias Calculating status...
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Dec 4, 2012 5:51 AM

Hey

 

Does anyone have any experience in using SSD drive in a Mac Pro mid 2010? For instance a Kingstron HyperX?

 

Is it possible?

 

Regards Mathias

Mac Pro, Mac OS X (10.7.5)
  • RatVega™ Calculating status...
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    Dec 4, 2012 10:15 AM (in response to Galimathias)

    Yes, it is possible.

     

    A good place to start would be macsales.com - OWC - Official Site since they have many years of experience with Macs. They also offer a nice variety of SSD products. 

     

    The most useful application is as a system drive because SSD is expensive. You'll boot faster and the OS will run faster.  In the end, any resonably sized 3GB SSD should work. You can get the 6GB SSD but the Mac Pro internal bus is SATA II, so you won't see the extra speed.

  • 52club Calculating status...
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    Dec 4, 2012 3:23 PM (in response to Galimathias)

    You might want to chck out this OWC PCIe card that can bypass the 3GB limit. This way you don't have to give up a drive or optical slot or buy the carriage needed to fit the SSD.

  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 8 Level 8 (48,145 points)
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    Dec 4, 2012 5:00 PM (in response to Galimathias)

    Use any that appeals to you. Almost none fit easily on a standard sled. If you want help with that issue, just ask.

     

    But you should take steps to make certain the drive does not become clogged with deleted data. This can be done by enabling TRIM with a third-party utility, or by periodically consolidating free space with a third-party Utility and immediately erasing free space to Zeroes.

     

    You will get more payback in overall performance from establishing a Boot Drive, with only System, Library, Applications, and the hidden unix files including Paging/Sawp than from simply installing an SSD. User files are moved off to another data drive. If you want help with that, just ask.

    Mac Pro (Early 2009), Mac OS X (10.6.8), & Server, PPC, & AppleTalk Printers
  • fritzer Calculating status...
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    Feb 23, 2013 8:27 AM (in response to Grant Bennet-Alder)

    I could use your help on setting up a SSD from OWC 240 Mercury Electra 6G is on it's way. i have used everything from floppy to tape drives but never a SSD ! Read much information about but that's it..

     

    My system is a  Mac Pro5,1 3.2 Ghz Quad core ,13GB 1066Mhz memory, 2 -1Tb drives and 1- 250Gb 2.5 drive in a OWC adapter plate where the SSD 240 will be placed.

  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 8 Level 8 (48,145 points)
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    Feb 23, 2013 9:04 AM (in response to fritzer)

    A Mac Pro with multiple drives gets great benefit from establishing a Boot drive, with only System, Library, Applications, and the hidden unix files including Paging/Swap.  The Users folder, or individual Users' home folders are moved off to another drive:

     

    JapaMac's blog: Make Spare for performance -- Moving the Home Folder

     

    http://chris.pirillo.com/how-to-move-the-home-folder-in-os-x-and-why/

    Mac Pro (Early 2009), Mac OS X (10.6.8), & Server, PPC, & AppleTalk Printers
  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 8 Level 8 (48,145 points)
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    Feb 23, 2013 9:37 AM (in response to fritzer)

    In my opinion, SSD drives have a problem because of an assumption in File Systems.

     

    When a file is deleted with traditional rotating drives, only the directory entry is cleared, and the actual data blocks are simply added to the free pool to be re-used later. Re-use merely overwrites entire blocks (no read-modify-write involved). Simple, effective, and FAST.

     

    An SSD cannot write anything but a completely empty block, and its internal blocks are HUGE. To re-write a (partial) superblock, it must read-erase-modify-write, a very slow procedure.

     

    But no general-purpose notification is sent to the drive that the "un-needed" data blocks should be considered "deleted". This works fine for a rotating drive that will later simply overwrite deleted blocks. But lacking a notification of what blocks are "deleted", the SSD continues to carry ALL those "deleted" blocks as if they were good data. This clogs it up, and performance on many SSD drives goes way down.

     

    Apple-certified SSD drives use TRIM to notify the SSD which blocks have been deleted. But Apple routines do not send these commands to non-Apple-tested drives, as Apple has not tested these.

     

    TRIM Enabler from groths makes a patch to enable TRIM for any SSD that claims to support it. This may cause unintended consequences on certain drives. No one knows for sure. I use it and have had no issues with it. Use it at your own risk.

     

    If you choose to use it:

     

    Install the Utility.

    Run the Utility and enable TRIM for each drive you want.

    Restart.

    Run Disk Utility ( Repair Disk ). If all is well, you will get an additional message: "TRIM-ing unused blocks"

    Mac Pro (Early 2009), Mac OS X (10.6.8), & Server, PPC, & AppleTalk Printers
  • Eustace Mendis Level 7 Level 7 (24,610 points)
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    Feb 23, 2013 9:54 AM (in response to Grant Bennet-Alder)

    Hi Grant,

     

    Two questions:

    1. Why this last step? Run Disk Utility ( Repair Disk ). If all is well, you will get an additional message: "TRIM-ing unused blocks"

    2. Is the full procedure the same in every OS?

     

    Thanks.

     

    Eustace.

  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 8 Level 8 (48,145 points)
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    Feb 23, 2013 10:17 AM (in response to Eustace Mendis)

    The reason I suggest the last step is that during System Installation (without TRIM Enabled) you may have created many "deleted" blocks.

     

    Once enabled, TRIM will notify of blocks as they are deleted, but will not reach back and notify of the blocks deleted before TRIM was enabled. I stumbled across this feature in Disk Utility in 10.6 and later completely by accident, and realized this was a way to do a thorough "Repair Disk and mark 'deleted' blocks as surplus".

     

    It does not seem to be documented in the manual for Mac OS X fsck command in any way, so it may only exist in Disk Utility.

     

    In Windows that supports TRIM, it may be turned on at an early stage in the BIOS, so it may be working as you install. I do not know how to determine that.

     

    And except for this serendipitous discovery in Disk Utility, I do not know of a general-purpose way to do a "TRIM All unused". But there certainly should be one.

     

    ...

     

    ARE YOU LISTENING Microsoft, Linus Torvalds, and makers of Disk Warrior, Tech Tool Pro, Drive Genius, SpinRite??

     

    .

    Mac Pro (Early 2009), Mac OS X (10.6.8), & Server, PPC, & AppleTalk Printers
  • The hatter Level 9 Level 9 (58,595 points)
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    Feb 23, 2013 10:43 AM (in response to Grant Bennet-Alder)

    Get in touch with Mark @ Softriad and I am surprised you don't have a copy.

    Been years but I am pretty sure he or just Support would be helpful.

     

    Also Paragon-Software. If you use their NTFS drivers for Mac OS and use an SSD, do they do anything? I use a lot of their products on Windows and Mac I just don't like Mac doing any writes to my Windows drives though.

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