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Does MacKeeper weigh on your system?

289 Views 11 Replies Latest reply: Dec 5, 2012 10:37 AM by thomas_r. RSS
tiagomaymone Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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Dec 5, 2012 4:08 AM

I've hesitated a lot in starting this discussion.

Jesus Christ! How a common non-expert user can get completely lost in intricate discussions on the horrors or virtues of this software! To no conclusion, at least for me.

 

I have bought, installed, and used MacKeeper for a couple of months now, and - as far as I was able to notice - it did absolutely no harm to my system.

 

My only doubt is if it weighs on the system. Meaning: does it slow it down in a notorious way?

 

I know I risk starting another "tornado" with this question, ending up with no objective conclusion. But I thought I'd give it a chance.

For that purpose, I'd beg all those who feel like answering, to keep to the slowing down issue, and nothing else. Try to keep away from things like unethical advertising, crashing your system, impossible to uninstall, unwanted warning messages, and so on. Many of these issues may even be true, but with the endless, overheated and inconclusive discussions I've read, I prefer to rely on my own experience for those matters, and as I stated above, until now I've had no trouble.

So here it goes, with a tiny hope someone might help.

 

TM

MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2012), OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.2)
  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,905 points)
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    Dec 5, 2012 4:35 AM (in response to tiagomaymone)

    Keeping with in the constraints that you have stated, the only way you can somewhat accurately measure this is to have two MBPs, side by side, performing the same functions.

     

    Any application running in the background will have an impact on a computers performance.  I suspect that there are tools available that can give accurate measurements, but I am not a 'bench tester' and know of any specifically.  Perhaps some one will will be able to furnish such information.

     

    Should your MBP crash, freeze or perceptively slow down, examine Activity Monitor, Console and Crash reports for clues for the reasons.

     

    Ciao.

  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,905 points)
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    Dec 5, 2012 4:56 AM (in response to tiagomaymone)

    I do not have MacKeeper. I will not install MacKeeper (nor any other so-called performance enhancing or 'cleaning' application').  I am not in a position to offer any more information on this topic.

     

    Ciao

  • clintonfrombirmingham Level 7 Level 7 (26,885 points)
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    Dec 5, 2012 7:36 AM (in response to tiagomaymone)

    I was one of the saps who bought into MacKeeper - yes, I, too, paid for it. Depending on the settings, it can slow your machine down but, more significantly, it is just plain bothersome and useless. I had to go through the Bay Area BBB but I did receive a refund from Zeobit, and I've warned others since then that it can be more than an annoyance - it can cause problems with the OS.

     

    Clinton

  • John Galt Level 7 Level 7 (33,235 points)
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    Dec 5, 2012 8:04 AM (in response to tiagomaymone)

    Some people who installed MacKeeper had it running for months before the problems it caused became apparent. I installed it, experimented with it, found out what it did, and then deleted it. I did not notice any performance degradation but did not devote enough time to find out.

     

    The problem with MacKeeper and all other such "cleaning" apps is that there is no way for them to discriminate among required system components and actions, and superfluous or potentially malicious ones. When it finds something that its algorithm erroneously concludes is the latter, the result is often a broken Mac and an upset Mac user.

     

    The fallacy behind all these third party anti-virus peddlers is their claim to protect OS X with their products better than the engineers who designed it, and better than the company whose reputation is at stake. The best of these products are harmless, but the worst of them will manifest their incompetence in lost money, time, and data - all of them yours.

     

    Perhaps you should ask yourself what benefit you expect from MacKeeper.

    MacBooks  iMacs  iPods  AirPorts, OS X Mountain Lion,  27 years Apple!
  • John Galt Level 7 Level 7 (33,235 points)
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    Dec 5, 2012 8:41 AM (in response to tiagomaymone)

    tiagomaymone wrote:

     

    And what do you people say about free anti-virus software, like the one from Avira (avira.com - a software house I trusted a lot when I used Windows)?

     

     

    The first thing to keep in mind is that there are no OS X viruses - none. It is logically impossible to detect and eradicate something that is not present, therefore Mac anti-virus software is of no benefit. The only viruses that can be detected on a Mac are those that affect Windows, for which Windows users are responsible. Without anti-virus software a Windows computer will become useless in a very short amount of time.

     

    If Windows never existed we would not be having this conversation. The best thing for a Mac user to do is forget it ever did.

     

    Mac malware exists - it always has - but it is incredibly rare. Nothing can prevent you from deliberately or unwittingly installing ill-written software or something malicious on your Mac, but OS X protects itself quite well on its own. All you have to do is let it. You already paid for its benefits as part of your Mac's purchase price. As far as third party AV software is concerned "free" is often not worth it.

     

    You shouldn't stick your head in the sand pretending that Mac malware is not a threat. Threats exist and they always will, and the best defence against them is to educate yourself. Blindly installing some magical cure-all avoids education and is a poor strategy that borders on irresponsibility. I will leave it to others to suggest some resources for you to follow.

    MacBooks  iMacs  iPods  AirPorts, OS X Mountain Lion,  27 years Apple!
  • Courcoul Level 6 Level 6 (11,210 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 5, 2012 8:43 AM (in response to clintonfrombirmingham)

    clintonfrombirmingham wrote:

     

    I was one of the saps who bought into MacKeeper - yes, I, too, paid for it.

    Congrats.... clap.gif

     

    NOT!

     

    P.T.Barnum was right.... facepalmsmiley.gif fail.gif jpshakehead.gif

     

    Now back to our topic at hand. Measuring the work load imposed by a process is difficult with the scant tools offered by the system per se. Maybe run Activity Monitor while running just that deplorable product and taking note of the stats, then running the system in Safe Mode (which should presumably disable the crap) and comparing.

  • thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (27,065 points)
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    Dec 5, 2012 10:19 AM (in response to tiagomaymone)

    And what do you people say about free anti-virus software, like the one from Avira (avira.com - a software house I trusted a lot when I used Windows)?

     

    I can't say anything about Avira - it's not one that is commonly used by Mac users, and was not included in my recent testing of Mac anti-virus detection rates - but, in general, any anti-virus software that includes any kind of background or on-access scanning will have some effect on your system's performance. That effect could be so small as to be unnoticeable or could be huge. This will depend on what AV software you're using and what the specs of your machine are. ClamXav is pretty good (it had some problems in my testing, but those have been remedied at this point) and causes no problems at all. Sophos is also quite good, and is more sophisticated than ClamXav, but also has more possibility for causing problems on a sub-optimal machine.

  • thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (27,065 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 5, 2012 10:37 AM (in response to tiagomaymone)

    So you don't consider there are no viruses for Mac?

     

    There are no viruses, using the strict definition of the word "virus." There certainly is malware, though very, very little of it. See my Mac Malware Guide.

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