4 Replies Latest reply: Dec 11, 2012 7:49 AM by Linc Davis
framefiller Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Time machine will not allow me to acess what is on my backup drive


iMac, OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.2)
  • 1. Re: Time machine is fadded
    Eric Root Level 6 Level 6 (16,220 points)

    Is the backup drive showing in the Finder sidebar?

     

    Have you rechecked System Preferences/Time Machine to ensure the correct drive is still shown as the backup drive.?

     

    If you go to the drive and double click the sparse bundle image, will it mount in Finder?

     

    Is Time Machine still backing up?

  • 2. Re: Time machine is fadded
    Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (118,475 points)

    See "Some backups are faded-out and not visible" on this page:

     

    Time Machine - Troubleshooting E2. I can't see some backups

  • 3. Re: Time machine is fadded
    framefiller Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    The time machine is no longer backing up because there is not enough space for a complete back up on the drive. Even though 900 bibabites of space is used on the back up device (a G safe) Time Machine thinks there is nothing backed up so it wants to preform a complete back up with the remaining 100 gigabites of space left on the safe. Otherwise everything seems OK except I can not get any of the data that is already backed up on the drive. I am not haveing a mounting problem. i am haveing a problem getting the capital i to type but that is another thing.As far as the suggestion from linc davis nothing there seems to work either. it doesnt matter where i open time machine i get the same fadded backup pages. i did notice that my drive labled Macintosh HD does not show up in the side bar, although it is there when i press contro;; command c key. if i just open my G safe i can see all the files. i just cant access them from time machine.

  • 4. Re: Time machine is fadded
    Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (118,475 points)

    Put the backup drive aside for now. Start a new backup on another, larger external drive. When you're sure you'll no longer need the data on the old drive, erase it and start over. You need more than one backup to be safe, as this experience shows.