7 Replies Latest reply: Dec 12, 2012 8:16 AM by Kappy
krockarooni Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Macbook pro 13" Mid 2010

2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo

8GB 1067 MHz DDR3

 

Need to upgrade my 250GB harddrive to 1TB, do you know if this one will fit ?

 

http://www.amazon.com/WD-Blue-Mobile-Hard-Drive/dp/B005DVJJWQ/ref=cm_cr_pr_produ ct_top

 

WD Blue 1 TB Mobile Hard Drive: 2.5 Inch, 5400 RPM, SATA II, 8 MB Cache

Product Dimensions: 3.9 x 2.8 x 0.4 inches


 

 

 

Any help is much appreciated! Thanks guys n' gals!

 

(also I am going to want to format it for mountain lion, should I just get the DVD from the store to make it easier?)


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.7.3)
  • 1. Re: Will this hard drive work in my mid 2010 macbook pro 13" ?
    Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (226,765 points)

    I would strongly recommend against the WD Blue drives. Stick to the Scorpio Black models or other makers' drives. For better performance get a 7200 RPM drive. See the inventory at OWC.

  • 2. Re: Will this hard drive work in my mid 2010 macbook pro 13" ?
    krockarooni Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Think this will be a better match?

     

    http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX31974

     

    Realistically 750GB is plenty

  • 3. Re: Will this hard drive work in my mid 2010 macbook pro 13" ?
    Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (226,765 points)

    Yes, definitely. There is an important consideration. The reason the drive is so cheap is because there is no manufacturer's warranty. You get only a one year warranty from the vendor. I suggest that might wish to add on the 3-year replacement warranty for another $10.00.

  • 4. Re: Will this hard drive work in my mid 2010 macbook pro 13" ?
    krockarooni Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thank you Kappy I will do that! So a 7200rpm and 16MB will work? That's awesome, I really do appreciate it and am sure this will help others out there as well.

  • 5. Re: Will this hard drive work in my mid 2010 macbook pro 13" ?
    Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (226,765 points)

    Yes, that should work quite well. I think you'll be pleased.

  • 6. Re: Will this hard drive work in my mid 2010 macbook pro 13" ?
    krockarooni Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Do you think formatting it with the DVD will be the easiest option?

  • 7. Re: Will this hard drive work in my mid 2010 macbook pro 13" ?
    Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (226,765 points)

    Do you have a Snow Leopard DVD? If so then you can use it to prep the drive. You are going to need an external enclosure in order to get everything done:

     

    How to replace or upgrade a drive in a laptop

     

    Step One: Repair the Hard Drive and Permissions

     

    Boot to the Recovery HD:

     

    Restart the computer and after the chime press and hold down the COMMAND and R keys until the menu screen appears. Alternatively, restart the computer and after the chime press and hold down the OPTION key until the boot manager screen appears. Select the Recovery HD and click on the downward pointing arrow button.

     

    Repair

     

    When the recovery menu appears select Disk Utility. After DU loads select your hard drive entry (mfgr.'s ID and drive size) from the the left side list.  In the DU status area you will see an entry for the S.M.A.R.T. status of the hard drive.  If it does not say "Verified" then the hard drive is failing or failed. (SMART status is not reported on external Firewire or USB drives.) If the drive is "Verified" then select your OS X volume from the list on the left (sub-entry below the drive entry,) click on the First Aid tab, then click on the Repair Disk button. If DU reports any errors that have been fixed, then re-run Repair Disk until no errors are reported. If no errors are reported then click on the Repair Permissions button. When the process is completed, then quit DU and return to the main menu. Select Restart from the Apple menu.

     

    Step Two: Remove the old drive and install the new drive.  Place the old drive in an external USB enclosure.  You can buy one at OWC who is also a good vendor for drives.

     

    Step Three: Boot from the external drive.  Restart the computer and after the chime press and hold down the OPTION key until the boot manager appears.  Select the icon for the external drive then click on the downward pointing arrow button.

     

    Step Four: New Hard Drive Preparation

     

      1. Open Disk Utility in your Utilities folder.

     

      2. After DU loads select your new hard drive (this is the entry with the

          mfgr.'s ID and size) from the left side list. Note the SMART status of

          the drive in DU's status area.  If it does not say "Verified" then the drive

          is failing or has failed and will need replacing.  Otherwise, click on the

          Partition tab in the DU main window.

     

      3. Under the Volume Scheme heading set the number of partitions from

          the drop down menu to one. Set the format type to Mac OS Extended

          (Journaled.) Click on the Options button, set the partition scheme to

          GUID  then click on the OK button. Click on the Partition button and

          wait until the process has completed.

     

      4. Select the volume you just created (this is the sub-entry under the

          drive entry) from the left side list. Click on the Erase tab in the DU main

          window.

     

      5. Set the format type to Mac OS Extended (Journaled.) Click on the

          Options button, check the button for Zero Data and click on OK to

          return to the Erase window.

     

      6. Click on the Erase button. The format process can take up to several

          hours depending upon the drive size.

     

    Step Five: Clone the old drive to the new drive

     

      1. Open Disk Utility from the Utilities folder.

      2. Select the destination volume from the left side list.

      3. Click on the Restore tab in the DU main window.

      4. Check the box labeled Erase destination.

      5. Select the destination volume from the left side list and drag it to the

          Destination entry field.

      6. Select the source volume from the left side list and drag it to the

          Source entry field.

      7. Double-check you got it right, then click on the Restore button.

     

    Destination means the new internal drive. Source means the old external drive.

     

    Step Six: Open the Startup Disk preferences and select the new internal volume.  Click on the Restart button.  You should boot from the new drive.  Eject the external drive and disconnect it from the computer.