1 2 3 4 5 Previous Next 67 Replies Latest reply: Jan 15, 2013 3:59 PM by huocp Go to original post
  • 30. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    Tom Gewecke Level 9 Level 9 (71,730 points)

    mr88cet wrote:

     

    By the way, do you have a link to the Wiki page from which you copied that set examples of Japanese-Simplified discrepancies? 

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Han_unification

  • 31. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    mr88cet Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    OK, thanks anyway...

  • 32. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    mr88cet Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Deleting the app and reloading it doesn't seem to help.  Hmmm...  Well, it was worth a try...

  • 33. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    WangHan Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hey Hello!

    I was looking for a solution for the same problem. I'm studying chinese and since I installed IOS6 the characters changed and it was driving me crazy.

    I found something for IPAD and and I tried on my itouch and it actually worked!

     

     

    The thing is switch your device's language to chinese (it may install some kind of dictionary/font...?) and i switched again to spanish (in your case english i guess hehe). And since then, i can write "normal characters". You should try

     

     

    Settings > General > International

    Switch to 简体中文

    Then let the device install whatever it install, and try to change it again into english.

     

     

    FONT: http://www.sinosplice.com/life/archives/2012/02/28/unmixing-chinese-and-japanese -fonts-on-the-ipad-and-mac-os

     

     

    Hope it works too for you!

  • 34. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    mr88cet Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    谢谢你回答!

     

    Actually, I already am aware of this solution.  However, I found that it works for everything except for the iPad version of "Rosetta Course."  That one app, and as far as I can tell only that one app, still shows the whacky Kanji-esque font.

     

    "WangHan",吧?不太可能这是"汪瀚"吧?那是我太太的哥哥的名字。:-)

  • 35. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    WangHan Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Ok! I just discovered today and I was terribly happy because it was annoying

    哈哈,我名字是"王涵", my chinese teacher changed my name because the "han" i choosed was too masculine and agressive apparently and names for girls must be "soft and delicated" LOL

  • 36. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    mr88cet Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Yes, I am very glad that that fix works for ... almost everything ... on the iPad and iPhone! Those characters are really terrible, especially if you're trying to learn the language!  I personally think that the entire premise of that font is fundamentally flawed - a really stupid idea.  There's no reason why we should expect the characters to look the same in Japan and China.  If they hold along different paths, then computer fonts should accurately reflect that disparate evolution. 

  • 37. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    Tom Gewecke Level 9 Level 9 (71,730 points)

    mr88cet wrote:

     

      I personally think that the entire premise of that font is fundamentally flawed - a really stupid idea.  There's no reason why we should expect the characters to look the same in Japan and China.  If they hold along different paths, then computer fonts should accurately reflect that disparate evolution. 

     

    I am really puzzled by these comments.  There is nothing wrong with any font.  The one you don't like is intended for use with Japanese and not Chinese.  The problem arises when the OS or an app uses the Japanese font when it should be using the Chinese font instead.  In both OS X and iOS this can happen if the language settings are in the wrong order.  In Unicode all Han characters are unified so there is no way to know from plain text whether the language being used is Japanese, Chinese, or Korean or even ancient Vietnamese.  So the info on which font to use has to come from elsewhere, like the language order settings in Apple products.

  • 38. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    mr88cet Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    That is a valid distinction, and yes, I agree that the problem is not the entire font, but when it is used incorrectly.

     

    Nevertheless, one portion of that font, I believe is based upon a fundamentally misguided goal.  That portion consists of Simplified Chinese characters designed to match glyph patterns of Kanji.  These characters are neither correct Kanji nor correct Simplified Chinese, the goal apparently being to try to create a consistent style across multiple cultures.  I see no value in that whatsoever. 

  • 39. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    Tom Gewecke Level 9 Level 9 (71,730 points)

    mr88cet wrote:

     

    Nevertheless, one portion of that font, I believe is based upon a fundamentally misguided goal.  That portion consists of Simplified Chinese characters designed to match glyph patterns of Kanji.  These characters are neither correct Kanji nor correct Simplified Chinese, the goal apparently being to try to create a consistent style across multiple cultures.  

     

    I think this underestimates the extent to which "simplified" Han characters are in fact also Kanji.  The fonts in question are designed to reflect actual Japanese glyph usage, and I doubt that any are "wrong" in the Japanese context.  Even the apparently crazy glyph used for the simplified version of men2 "door" has an explanation, see example 2 at

     

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryakuji

  • 40. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    mr88cet Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    My viewpoint:  Japan does not use Simplified Chinese.  Therefore the decision to design the Simplified-Chinese portion of that font to reflect Japanese glyph usage is not a "style" decision;  it must match how those characters will be used.  The only correct decision therefore is to use Simplified-Chinese glyph patterns.  Any other choice is purely-and-simply wrong. 

  • 41. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    mr88cet Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I gather that the Unicode folks' viewpoint is that the font as a whole should look stylistically consistent, meaning that the portions of the font that are unique to Simplified Chinese should borrow glyph patterns from the rest of the Kanji-inspired font.  My viewpoint would be that they can at least get that portion that is unique to Chinese-language usage right, even if they have to sacrifice consistency some.

     

    Anyway...

     

    From an API perspective, I gather there must exist calls of the nature of, "use the currently selected system 汉字 font," be that the Kanji-styled one or the Chinese-styled one.  Since, even after switching the iPad over to the correct font, the Rosetta Course iPad app still uses the Kanji-inspired font for teaching Chinese, it appears that there must also be API calls of the nature of, "use this particular 汉字 font, regardless of whether it's the currently-selected system 汉字 font"?

  • 42. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    Tom Gewecke Level 9 Level 9 (71,730 points)

    mr88cet wrote:

     

    Since, even after switching the iPad over to the correct font, the Rosetta Course iPad app still uses the Kanji-inspired font for teaching Chinese, it appears that there must also be API calls of the nature of, "use this particular 汉字 font, regardless of whether it's the currently-selected system 汉字 font"?

     

    I don't understand the behavior of that app at all.  If there are such calls, I don't know of any other app uses them. I think they normally just use the Unicode codepoints in their text and rely on the OS to be set to use an appropriate font to display it.  Or include their own font in the app.  The latter is what I would expect Rosetta to do, but in that case you would not have the problem.  I gather their tech support is not able to tell you much about this issue?

  • 43. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    Tom Gewecke Level 9 Level 9 (71,730 points)

    mr88cet wrote:

     

    I gather that the Unicode folks' viewpoint is that the font as a whole should look stylistically consistent, meaning that the portions of the font that are unique to Simplified Chinese should borrow glyph patterns from the rest of the Kanji-inspired font. 

     

    From the Unicode point of view, the unified Han character set is used by Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese, and for each codepoint/character a font intended specifically for any of those languages could have differences reflecting local tradition and usage.  

     

    The concept of "simplified" doesn't really have a role in this.  Japanese text does use Han codepoints that are considered part of "simplified chinese".  For example U+4E0E 与 is the "simplified" version of U+8207 與, Chinese yu.  In Japanese U+4E0E is can be read as yo or ataeru/kumisuru/tomoni and is one of the 2136 kanji required for k-12 education.  The Japanese form differs from the Chinese form by having a longer horizontal line across the lower half.

  • 44. Re: Bizarre Simplified Chinese Font
    K T Level 7 Level 7 (23,700 points)

    Tom Gewecke wrote:

     

     

    I don't understand the behavior of that app at all.  If there are such calls, I don't know of any other app uses them.

    It is usually at this point where someone elects to create their own font set...be your own hero and go for it, I say