4 Replies Latest reply: Jan 7, 2013 9:32 AM by PeterBreis0807
olsena2 Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

My husband and I recently took over editing a newsletter for our car club. The previous editor used InDesign which we don't have. We are recreating it in Pages and so I have some formatting questions. The newsletter is really in a magazine format, 8.5x11 and is about 20 pages long. I had to set up the pages to have a 0.125 marginal bleed for the publisher. I have to include a centerfold which is one picture. I don't know how to set this up in pages. I think I need to create a new section and have that page be 17" wide but "insert section" is grayed out. I'd appreciate anyone's guidance, thanks!


MacBook Pro, iPhone, Apple TV, iPod, iMAC, Mac OS X (10.6.6)
  • 1. Re: how do I set up a centerfold using one graphic
    Walt K Level 4 Level 4 (2,895 points)

    When I had to do this, my printer said she could accept a separate 11 X 17 PDF. Talk to your printer. Maybe that will work for you.

     

    Walt

  • 2. Re: how do I set up a centerfold using one graphic
    PeterBreis0807 Level 7 Level 7 (29,620 points)

    You can also simply use two adjacent pages each with half the material on the appropriate half.

     

    Duplicate any spanning headline or graphic and make each protude to the left or right, using the Metric Inspector to align them.

     

    Peter

  • 3. Re: how do I set up a centerfold using one graphic
    olsena2 Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Thanks for the suggestions, the printer was able to accept a separate pdf so that got us set up for January's edition but I still want to get it in the template.

     

    Peter - do you know how to split a pdf in half vertically?

     

    I still think the ideal way to handle it is to be able to insert one 17" wide page and keep the rest of the publication as 8.5x11. There has got to be a way to do this.

  • 4. Re: how do I set up a centerfold using one graphic
    PeterBreis0807 Level 7 Level 7 (29,620 points)

    Pages does not have spreads or bleeds or many Pro features.

     

    It is really a case of Back to the Future, doing what I used to have to do in the 1980's. Just repeat the image twice, once on the left half of the spread and once on the right half of the spread. If it is a photo it is easy to actually split it into two halves using Photoshop, Pixelmator etc. which keeps the file size down.

     

    Splitting pdfs is really just the same as repeating individual objects, the basic pdf doesn't change it is simply masked into 2 halves.

     

    As I said if you want to maintain the spread as editable do what I suggested in my first post.

     

    Peter