3 Replies Latest reply: Feb 13, 2013 9:52 PM by Karsten Schlüter
redpony12 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

I am one of several physics teachers at my school who want to create some instructional videos for our students that are short, entertaining, and pertinent to what they're learning. We do NOT want our videos to be boring like so many teachers' videos are.

 

We want to show the students concept overviews, equations, sample problems, etc -- more for review than anything else.

 

We were thinking we'd like them to be sort of like the "Minute Physics" videos on YouTube. For those not familiar with Minute Physics they mostly show wriitng and sketches on a whiteboard at a faster speed than normal with traditional narration over it. I don't think any of us really wants our own faces in the videos.

 

I'd like to use my MacBook Pro if possible since I'll most likely be doing the editing. We have Dell computers at school with SmartBoards. We also have some computers (at school) with Camtasia on them and access to video cameras.

 

Can we do this using iMovie? Any suggestions, ideas, etc??  Help??

  • 1. Re: making instructional videos
    Karsten Schlüter Level 7 Level 7 (29,885 points)

    redpony12 wrote:

    …  Can we do this using iMovie? Any suggestions, ideas, etc??  Help??

    iMovie is for editing - do you have a camera? a set? light? a charismatic presenter?

     

    a well-structured Keynote presentation is maybe easier to accomplish. you can use iMovie to give a Keynote-quicktime-export the final glance (narration, pic-in-pic, video integration)

     

    the 'Minute Physics' videos are highly professional executed - you'd need a 'light tent' and for sure some lights to create this 'clean' look; plus some voice-talent plus some 'better' audio-recording facility (good mic, non reflective room/box). after all, the speed-up effect and simple editing is possible in iM .... looks simple, but no trivia task.- as all simple looking things

  • 2. Re: making instructional videos
    redpony12 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Karsten,

     

    Thanks for the suggestion about Keynote -- I'll try it.

     

    I think my group of teachers can make fairly good videos using a SmartBoard and the Mac computer. We're going to give it a try, anyway...  I'll report back later to let you know how it went.

     

    By the way, some of my high school students used regular old school whiteboards and dry erase markers to make a video about momentum in the same style as minutephysics. It wasn't professional but it worked...  it was short, entertaining, factually correct, and they had fun doing it.

     

    Thanks again for the suggestion about Keynote, by the way!

     

    Message was edited by: redpony12

  • 3. Re: making instructional videos
    Karsten Schlüter Level 7 Level 7 (29,885 points)

    redpony12 wrote:

    ...  it was short, entertaining, factually correct, and they had fun doing it.

    … what is that wonderful English phrase?

    "Mission accomplished!"

     

    a good story/content doesn't need glitzy production, that is correct.

    and maybe my standards were too high, when you mentioned 'Minute Physics'.

     

    but you can add a ton of quality with a shoestring-budget (I'm a hobbyist, no pro!):

     

    • experiment (hey, science ahead) with indirekt lightning, use two bright lamps left/right, use large, white styro cardboxes for reflection; or an old white drape (carefully! high watt lamps+drapes=fire!)

     

    • to create a 'studio quality' sound impression, while recording narration (I wouldn't use the live sound) pull a thick blanket over head, mic, monitor - gives a non-reflected, 'dry' sound … looks silly, but works. post production narration has also the advantage, the talent with a nice hand-writing doesn't have to have a good voice and vice versa

     

    • although just a minute, consider 'invisible cuts', maybe easier for your talents to structure the presentation into takes, with a jump-pan across the board you can hide takes

     

    enjoy your movie-making!