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MacBook Pro Retina display burn-in?

1269547 Views 9,422 Replies Latest reply: Apr 14, 2014 1:55 PM by SonGuko RSS Branched to a new discussion.
  • Jajaba Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 12:46 PM (in response to David Hagan)

    Well there is no comptuer or monitor that ships with a usable color calibration for professional use, so I guess you aren't in a profession that requires an accurate color workflow.  That being said my rMBP was the closest I've seen, 'out of the box', to an accurate sRGB calibration, the white point was off slightly to the cooler side and the colors were shifted due to this.  I didn't keep my original profile test of the Apple default profile but I would say it was about 90% of what I get after my own calibration. 

     

    If you don't normally work on an accurately calibrated monitor then it's quite possible that your perception is that the rMBP screen appears to be warmer to you when it actually is closer to true sRGB standards.  Especially since you are complaining about a "yellowish color temperature" on all 3 LG screens you've had.  Almost every notebook (White LED) has very cool white point from the factory compared to industry standards.  Since last year on the iPad 3 Apple chose to use an industry standard sRGB target of D65, 2.2 Gamma on all new color devices, which is the most common web standard. 

     

    If you want to try a quick check do this:  Go to Sytem preferences > Displays > Color Tab > Calibrate - Then hit Continue and toggle between the 1.8 and 2.2 Gamma buttons and see if 1.8 looks better (more normal) to your eyes.  If so then you've essentially trained yourself to think that 'cooler' is 'normal'..  You can then hit Continue again and toggle the white point buttons.  If your white point is off you will see a difference between the D65 and the Native buttons, if they look the same then your display is close to the correct D65 whitpoint.

  • Jajaba Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 1:32 PM (in response to Jajaba)

    I forgot to mention that if you choose the 'expert' mode checkbox in Calibration Assistant then you can just move the slider to set a target whitepoint that suits your viewing preference.  The slider shows the effects on the whole screen not just the active window so you can open an image in the backround to see the effects...  So even if your native whitepoint is off for some reason you can manually overide it to get rid of any apparent 'yellowish' tint.

  • David Hagan Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 2:33 PM (in response to Jajaba)

    Hi Jajaba,

     

     

    1.8 Gamma doesn't look normal to me.  When I leave the display gamma at 2.2, and I proceed to the white point section, it's already set at D65. My 2009 17" MacBook Pro has identical settings for "Color LCD" in Displays > Calibrate, but its white point is more neutral. I've never had to calibrate it even though I know it has a slightly red bias.  But it's not peceptable.  On the retina MacBook Pro, I have to go to 7,100 to try to neutralize the white point. But it still doesn't look quite right. I'm not a fanatic over precise color. I understand that there's no "perfect display." If it's noticeable to my eyes off the bat and it's perceived yellowish/warmer in photographs I've taken with my iPhone and Canon Elph — then it stands to reason that it is yellower/warmer.

     

    Here's are some pictures I took of mine compared to my 2009 17" MacBook Pro on the right:

     

    1a.jpg

    1b.jpg

    1c.jpg

     

    Here are some links I've found on YouTube also showing this problem:

     

    http://youtu.be/JuAqMSIl9n8

     

    http://youtu.be/uGzYaWgbf4w

     

    Starting to see a trend?

     

    Except for this issue, I love the retina design...the speakers are great...the screen is amazingly crisp...BUT...

  • David Hagan Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 2:26 PM (in response to David Hagan)

    I apologize for the quality of the pictures — I thought they would come out better when I resized them. 

  • millerrh512 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 2:44 PM (in response to David Hagan)

    One problem with images is the camera also has a white balance and all of our monitors have yet a different white balance.  So you have three sources of error when trying to show off the white balance issues of a computer monitor via an internet forum.

     

    That being said, I have always calibrated my screens and almost without exception the correctly calibrated monitor was warmer than what was shipped from the factory.  If you have never calibrated before you are likely just used to a screen that is blue-er than correct.  So one that is closer to be accurate is perceived as too yellow.  Our eyes are very good at adjusting to differences in white balance.  It's why you can put on those orange goggles and things begin to seem OK.  Then when you take them off, everything seems blue.

     

    I am looking at your images on my calibrated screen right now.  The yellow ones more closely match the white background of this forum on my monitor and the blue ones seem too blue.  If you were to ask me to tell you which ones were out of calibration based on those pictures, I would tell you the blue one(s).

     

    But, like I said you can't tell a lot from pictures posted regarding color accuracy.  So there very well may be an issue.  I just don't think these pics did it justice, because the "yellow" display matches my whites pretty well.

     

    To go even further down the rat-hole, here is a picture of your pictures on my monitor so you can see what I'm talking about.  Hopefully you see how blue the one on the right is and how close to white the "yellow" one is. Note how nearly identical the left screen is to the surrounding white.

     

    screen wb.PNG

  • shayster98 Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 2:59 PM (in response to millerrh512)

    millerrh512 wrote:

     

    One problem with images is the camera also has a white balance and all of our monitors have yet a different white balance.  So you have three sources of error when trying to show off the white balance issues of a computer monitor via an internet forum.

    He isn't trying to show us the precise white balance of his screen; he's showing the difference between his 15" MBPr display and his 17" MBP one. He put the 17" into the image solely for comparison, thus depicting how much yellower his rMBP screen is than his other laptops. That difference will always be constant, no matter how far off his camera's white balance settings were or how terrible OUR screens are.

     

    But yes, if the photos ONLY had his rMBP display in there and nothing else, then I'd agree with you totally.

  • Jajaba Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 3:02 PM (in response to David Hagan)

    This is not a 'trend' at all.  As I suspected you, like most people, have trained yourself to perceive a cooler whitepoint as 'normal' due to the poor factory calibrations of most LCD displays.  This is very common due to the majority of consumer LCD displays coming from the manufactuer with a 'high' native whitepoint (cooler color temp).  Your pics clearly show a very blue tint on the 17" display versus a very nuetral tone on the rMBP.  As I said above Apple has standardized on the sRGB standard of 2.2 Gamma D65 in order to have consistancy between all their new color displays.  If you spent a few days only viewing a properly calibrated display then went back to your 17" you would be amazed at how blue the display looks, you'd swear someone messed with the color adjustments because it would look so harsh and blueish...

  • shayster98 Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 3:09 PM (in response to Jajaba)

    We don't know whether his 17" display is too cool and his 15" is neutral, or whether his 17" is neutral and his 15" is too warm, because, like millerrh512 said, you can't judge the actual white point of a screen from an online image, as factors such as camera white balance and the white balance of our screens affect how we view that image. His point was mainly to show us the DIFFERENCE between the two screens (i.e. that the 15" display was much warmer). This does not mean that the 15" display is too yellow on its own.

  • Jajaba Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 3:19 PM (in response to shayster98)

    His rMBP images are nuetral (not yellow) and the 17" images are very cool (blue tinted).  millarrh512 is correct in all he posted.  To elaborate on his comments on white balance;  the main point of accurate calibration is to have an accurate nuetral baseline so that anything you look at on screen is not corrupted further by innacuracies in your monitor. For example if your display is tinted blue (whether you think it is or not), if you adjust the white balance in a photo app so it looks correct on your display then you go to print it out and find the colors are completely off...  it's because you edited it to look correct on an uncalibrated display that compounded the inncorect whitebalance from the original image file....  There are many other variables (gamma curve, luminosity, color gamut etc.) but this is just a basic example of the need for accurate calibration if your trying to do anything with accurate colors from input to output.

  • millerrh512 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 3:20 PM (in response to shayster98)

    Yeah, his images did do a good job of comparing one screen vs. another.  One is definitely warmer and one is definitely cooler.  But nobody will know exactly how they compare to accurate. 

     

    If he feels the camera white point was set in such a way that it accurately depicted his screens then I think the yellow one seems more neutral.

     

    Although how could he know if his camera white point was accurate if he's looking at it on potentially questionable displays

  • shayster98 Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2013 3:28 PM (in response to millerrh512)

    millerrh512 wrote:

     

    Yeah, his images did do a good job of comparing one screen vs. another.  One is definitely warmer and one is definitely cooler.  But nobody will know exactly how they compare to accurate.

    Exactly what I was trying to say.

  • Slabsheriff Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 3:54 PM (in response to mittense)

    Hi, just bought a rMBP 15" 4 days ago and I did the terminal command to find out that I have an LG screen.  I did some tests like leaving a checkered black and white image on screen for an hour and I have no IR.  I am still in my 14 day period.  I have no issues with the screen yet but shoud I still return it?

    Thanks.

  • Florin101 Level 2 Level 2 (170 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2013 5:22 PM (in response to Slabsheriff)

    No point in returing it. It's like returning a winning lotery ticket. Unfortuentely, most LG's have IR plus SAMSUNG Retinas a rare so If you return it you will probably get a defective LG. So over all, KEEP IT! YOU'LL be glad you did!

  • David Hagan Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2013 5:39 PM (in response to millerrh512)

    It's *very* hard to take accurate pictures with a point and shoot.   I understand that the eyes can adjust to different whites. The best is to say that with the naked eye, the 17" MacBook Pro looks neutral and the new retina MacBook Pro has more of a sepia tone to it.

  • Jajaba Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2013 5:57 PM (in response to millerrh512)

    Actually comparing images with correct (matching) white balance is quite easy,  I just shoot a calibrated xrite color/greyscale target in the same lighting as what I'm shooting.  The software program then makes a color calibration profile for lightroom from the color target image that you apply to the pictures, you can also set exact white balance from the neutral or 18% greyscale swatch on the target.  This allows me to get exact color matches between my Canon, Nikon and Sony bodies (and different lenses combos).  Great for shoots where I use different camera body/lens combinations.

     

    I could shoot my screen with/without calibration to post here but there is still the issue of others viewing it on an uncalibrated screen...

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