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MacBook Pro 15" - New internal Hard Drive?

5117 Views 24 Replies Latest reply: Aug 31, 2013 9:03 PM by Ayush741994 RSS
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bobmermans Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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Jan 20, 2013 10:00 AM

Hi Guys

 

After a full weekend of trying to clean install my MacBook Pro 15" from the spring of 2011, which had Mountain Lion installed, I have to conclude that reinstalling Mountain Lion or Lion really isn't an option at the moment...

 

I called Apple Support twice yesterday, thanks to them I got a lot further in reinstalling Snow Leopard from the DVD, (thanks Apple Support! ) but they think that my internal hard drive might be damaged, which causes the crashing of Mountain Lion and Lion when installing.

 

So, which internal hard drive should I install, can I take a bigger one (now 500 GB) than I had before, and can I also upgrade my processor?

 

Thanks in advance guys!

 

Bob

MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.7.2)
  • sdpitbull Level 3 Level 3 (965 points)
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    Jan 20, 2013 2:15 PM (in response to bobmermans)

    Yes, there are bigger HD out there that your machine will support. Mine came with 500 GB and I upgraded to 750. There are even 1 TB drives out now. You simply remove the old and plug in the new.

     

    Processor upgrades are not widely available for the Mac and probably not worth the effort but I'm sure others will chime in.

  • sdpitbull Level 3 Level 3 (965 points)
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    Jan 20, 2013 2:37 PM (in response to bobmermans)

    It depends on who you believe. Personally I stay away from Seagate. I have had no issues with Western Digital and some of their drives are just under $99 for 750 GB. I would stick to those two major brands or if you can get a deal on a Toshiba Apple sometimes uses those as OEM drives.

     

    If you really want to dream you may want to go to a SSD but the capacities are not that high yet and they are pricey. There is a company called Other World Computing that can give you more information. Currently SSDs at "reasonable" prices are around 256GB. I bought a new MacBook and paid a $500 upgrade for a 768 GB SSD but it is lightning fast and smooth as butter.

     

    Good luck!

  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,550 points)
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    Jan 20, 2013 3:05 PM (in response to bobmermans)

    Installing a new HDD is not as simple as a mere switch with the old one.  It must first be formatted so that it can be used in MBP and then there is a transfer of the data from the old internal one to the new one.  To do this properly, you will also need an enclosure for the format and transfer processes.

     

    When you install a new HDD that is larger than the original one, think about the ramifications it has on your backup strategy.  A backup HDD should at the very least have the same capacity as the internal HDD, preferably larger.

     

    As to what manufacturers you should look at, you will find that there are advocates for each brand as well as detractors.  I have Seagate's. Toshiba's and Hitachi's in my inventory.  All are still spinning with no casualties to date.  I have an aphorism;  You cannot have too much storage.  If the budget allows, get the largest capacity you can install.  Rpm speed is secondary.

     

    Ciao.

  • Network 23 Level 6 Level 6 (11,500 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 2:57 PM (in response to sdpitbull)

    sdpitbull wrote:

     

    It depends on who you believe. Personally I stay away from Seagate. I have had no issues with Western Digital and some of their drives are just under $99 for 750 GB. I would stick to those two major brands or if you can get a deal on a Toshiba Apple sometimes uses those as OEM drives.

    The brand doesn't matter all that much. Each of those makers has had a major problem in the last 5 years or so that caused users to say "I'll never use ____ again." But whatever brand they then switched to had probably just had a different problem that drove away customers. Truth is, all hard drive companies have had their flaws and all fix them so you never know which one is the best or worst at any given time. The second truth is, there are only a few hard drive makers left, so if you write one off you'll eventually write them all off and have no choices.

     

    You can only read the reviews to make sure the particular model you are buying (of any brand) has decent reviews, and take your chances. But what you will be taking chances on is a specific model, not an entire brand.

  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,550 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 3:32 PM (in response to bobmermans)

    It is dependent upon how much data you want to keep on your internal HDD.  Usually a 50% increase will give one adequate room to grow in.  A 750 GB HDD will be fine.  If you opt for a 7200 rpm model, it will enhance the performance of the MBP, but not by an astonishing amount.

     

    A 6 TB backup is more than adequate.  If the budget allows and if the data is important a redundant backup is a good strategy.  I recently had a situation where that made all the difference.  One may lose data on the internal HDD and find that the backup also has lost the data.  Though rare, it can and does happen.

     

    When it comes to install the HDD, have an enclosure ready.

     

    Put the new HDD in the enclosure and clone the data from the internal HDD to the new one.

     

    You can use Disk Utility>Restore or down load from the Internet Carbon Copy Cloner.

     

    When the copy/transfer of data is complete, test the new HDD to see if it will boot the MBP.

     

    If it passes that test, then do the physical swap of the two HDDs.

     

    Good luck.

     

    Ciao.

  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,550 points)
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    Jan 21, 2013 4:31 PM (in response to bobmermans)

    Very good.  Apparently you use your MBP in a vocational setting.  Hence it may be cost effective for you to have Apple do the work for you. It will not be done at rock bottom prices.

     

    Being inherently frugal (cheap) I do this work myself in order to limit my cash outlay.

     

    If you find that there are  some details that may need explanation, do not hesitate to ask.

     

    Ciao.

  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,550 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 24, 2013 10:56 AM (in response to bobmermans)

    It is possible.  I suggest that you have the technicians install the OS.  That way all of your headaches will be taken care of.  Installation of the OS will probably take an hour or so, so bring a sandwich.

     

    Ciao.

  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,550 points)
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    Jan 25, 2013 4:01 PM (in response to bobmermans)

    First go to the APP store and see if both Lion and Mt Lion are in your account.  If that is the case, then you can always install either when eve you wish.  There several options that you can exercise to guarantee this. 

     

    1.  Partition your internal HDD and install Mt. Lion on it (a small partition will do).  In the event that you would want to use it, you would  have to clone that partition on to a larger HDD then transfer your user data to the new HDD.  Then you would have to install it into your MBP by a physical swap or clone it to your internal HDD.

     

    2.  Get an external HDD and install Mt. Lion on it.  Same directions as above, but omitting the partition of the current HDD.

     

    3.  Make a USB thumb drive of Mt. Lion.  This would allow you to install Mt. Lion over Lion on your internal HDD without any cloning or user data transfer.  I have made USB thumb drives for both Lion and Mt. lion.  This way you do not need an Internet connection to install the OS and always have an option to revert to either OS.  I consider the best alternative.

     

    Here are directions for creating the USB thumb drive (They also apply to Lion):

     

    http://www.macworld.com/article/1167857/how_to_make_a_bootable_mountain_lion_ins tall_drive.html

     

    I like Time Machine and it is an excellent backup medium.  With that said, I like redundant backups.  In addition to Time Machine, another external HDD with all or the critical data is good to have for the simple reason that all HDDs will fail eventually.  Some people like to clone the internal HDD which creates a bootable HDD if the internal HDD should fail.  I don't do that because the USB thumb drives essentially perform the boot function, so I opt to just backup the important files.

     

    I hope I have covered everything.  If clarification is needed, don't be bashful.  Just ask.

     

    Ciao

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