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Export Settings for .MOV to send via Email (25MB or less)

2478 Views 9 Replies Latest reply: Jan 24, 2013 2:29 PM by Jon Walker RSS
aimeeturner Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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Jan 24, 2013 7:36 AM

I have Quicktime Pro on Windows XP. I have a video that is 1 min and 18 sec long filmed in HD 1280x720. I would like to export it using the best settings to preserve quality but keep it at 25 MB or less in order to easily send via email. I have been testing various settings and currently working on a spreadsheet to keep up with the sizes of each test. I would like to open this up to other users' opinions on this subject. So far, the best I have found are the following settings:

 

Compressor Type: H.264

Frame Rate: Current

Key Frames: Every 150 frames

Data Rate: Restrict to 2500 kbits/sec

Optimized for: Download

Encoding: Best Quality (Multi-Pass)

Quality: High

Dimensions: HD 1280x720 16:9

Preserve Aspect Ratio: Yes

Size: 24.5MB

 

Please advise. Thank you.

  • Jacumba Level 4 Level 4 (2,325 points)

    Is it a .mov

  • Jacumba Level 4 Level 4 (2,325 points)

    Scroll down to the post by allenrichard in this link.

     

    http://forum.powweb.com/showthread.php?t=22881

     

    The link post is old and it was several years ago when I used his method. It worked very well the compression size was amazing along with retaining great quality. As you'll see in clicking on his movie after he was done. After using this it was apparent to me that QuickTime pro is not very good at compressing down to a real small size.

     

    What I did was use QuickTime pro to convert a .mov to a .avi. So I could get it into windows movie maker. Windows movie maker will not accept a .mov. The end result is a .wmv

     

    What I'm not sure of if this works with H.264 But cost nothing to try as you already have QuickTime pro

     

     

    OK the actual video is no longer there, to see, just clicked on it myself.

     

    Message was edited by: Jacumba

  • Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (17,520 points)

    The encoding of multimedia files is as much of an art as it is a science and depeds as much on the specific nature of the content as anything else.

    I have Quicktime Pro on Windows XP. I have a video that is 1 min and 18 sec long filmed in HD 1280x720. I would like to export it using the best settings to preserve quality but keep it at 25 MB or less in order to easily send via email. I have been testing various settings and currently working on a spreadsheet to keep up with the sizes of each test. I would like to open this up to other users' opinions on this subject. So far, the best I have found are the following settings:

     

    Compressor Type: H.264

    Frame Rate: Current

    Key Frames: Every 150 frames

    Data Rate: Restrict to 2500 kbits/sec

    Optimized for: Download

    Encoding: Best Quality (Multi-Pass)

    Quality: High

    Dimensions: HD 1280x720 16:9

    Preserve Aspect Ratio: Yes

    Size: 24.5MB

     

    Please advise.

    Let's start with the basics...

     

    1) DESIRED TARGET FILE PARAMETERS: 25 MB file having a duration of 78 seconds

    The target parameters limit your combined total audio + video data rate to 2.564 Mbps or 2564 Kbps as calculated here...

     

    (25,000 KB x 8 bits/byte) / 78 seconds = 200,000 Kb / 78 seconds = 2564 Kbps

     

    Thus, if the audio plus video data was equally divided in frame segments, unfortunately they normally aren't unless you are using an all key-frame video work flow with a CBR audio compression format which would be inefficient.

     

    2) AUDIO SETTINGS

    A good place to start is usually to determine your audio requirements. In most cases you want to shy away from lower compression formats like AIFF, WAV, Uncompressed, etc., and stick with a higher compression efficieny codec like AAC. Next you would have to decide what level of quality to target. I would normally suggest something on the order of 80 to 160 Kbps per channel (mono or stereo) depending on your specific requirements for the project file and then subtract that amount from your combined total data rate calculated above. For example, a 160 Kbps Stereo (L R) 48.0 KHz target would leave 2404 Kbps for the target video data rate allocation as seen here:

     

    2564 Kbps - 160 Kbps = 2404 Kbps

     

    Note: Since the actual requirements for encoding audio and video content depend to some degree on the content itself being encoded, these calculations are merely "crude" estimates and may need/allow readjustment later. This is normal and should not be a cause for alarm at this time.

     

    3) ENCODING DIMENSIONS

    The next major decision is normally the choice of your encoding dimensions. You can either use an anamorphic or non-anamorphic approach here depending on the specific software used for encoding. Basically, an anamorphic approach allows the user to encoded the video data to a video matrix smaller dimensions than display dimensions and have the player automatically scale the final display dimensions for viewing. This normally provides a more efficient method of encoding your file in terms of time and files space with little or no visual loss in quality "if settings are kept reasonable." (E.g., I typically encode my 720p files using a 1024 x 720 encode matrix (cropped properly to proper aspect ratio) for proper aspect playback within the target 1280 x 720 window limits.

     

    4) KEY-FRAME FREQUENCY

    As you seem to have discovered, changing the key-frame frequency can have a dramatic effect on both quality and final file size. This setting helps to control the distribution of video data within the file container. Basically, a key-frame (intra-frame) contains a compressed rendering of all data contained in the video frame rather than inter-frame (reference or frame difference) data. Files containing a lot of action (rapid or complex motion vectors, fades, etc.) usually require more key-frames than sequences with little or none. One "rule of thumb" for QT is the "Ten Second Rule." This rule suggests you try a key-frame frquency equal to 10 times your target data rate for "average" content. E.g., every 240 frames for 24 fps content or 300 frames for 30 fps content. Unfortunate, most files are not "average" and may vary drastically even during short clips so it is often necessary to test "problem" segments to find an optimum setting for the "worst case scenario" segment of a file. Common settings may be as low as 12-15 fps for really complex content or 240-300 fps for a series of non-changing frames.

     

    5) B-FRAMES

    Another setting often used in the QT "Movie to QT Movie" option increase compression would be the use of "B-Frame" referencing. This is more efficient than the simple I- and P-Frame compression. If you use a work flow that offers this option and haven't selected it, you may wish to give it a try.

     

    6) FRAME RATES

    Normally, I would recommend users not change frame rates unless they can do so to their own work flow advantage. This is another way of reallocation data along the time axis—i.e., changing the data per frame allocation and may be useful if your source content allows detecene, decombing, or deinterlacing of your content.

     

    7) OTHER SETTINGS

    Unfortunately, the QT H.264 codec does not provide many user options to allow changes to the referece frame stucture or method of entropy encoding. On the other hand, if your work flow employs use of the X.264 codec with an advanced grahic or line input interface, then you can make additional changes to increase encoding efficiency (i.e., more quality in a small file) but usually at the expense of increase encoding/decoding time. For inctance, many of the more modern players running on new platforms/devices can benefit in terms of playback quality and file space requirements by using CABAC entropy ecoding instead of QT's CALVC default. Similar benefits may result from the use of higher Profile/Level combination settings if available. Like the "Multipass" encoding option, many settings and user options tend to either reduce the end file size or increase playback quality without increasing file size. Gaining practical experience by continuing your systematic testing of these settings and optionts will like be your most effecive way of meeting your stated goals.

     

    Not sure if this will help or not here. Most users who ply these forums seem more interested in an "I don't want to know anything about encoding" approach to getting the most out of their content, so I have been less and less inclined to respond to such topics of late.

     

    Best of luck...

     

    SJAUG.png

    iMac, OS X Mountain Lion, 3.4 GHz Quad Core i7, 12GB 1333 MHz
  • Jacumba Level 4 Level 4 (2,325 points)

    Well if that's the case. Your internet service provider likely offers backup, storage, and sharing for free of up to 2 to 3 GB. It's become very popular.

  • Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (17,520 points)

    One "rule of thumb" for QT is the "Ten Second Rule." This rule suggests you try a key-frame frquency equal to 10 times your target data rate for "average" content.

    Sorry, this should have read...

     

    One "rule of thumb" for QT is the "Ten Second Rule." This rule suggests you try a key-frame frquency equal to 10 times your target frame rate for "average" content.

    iMac, OS X Mountain Lion, 3.4 GHz Quad Core i7, 12GB 1333 MHz
  • Jon Walker Level 6 Level 6 (17,520 points)

    Export Results.jpg

    Your observations only confirm the generalities which can be stated as follows:

     

    1) File size is directly proportional to the total combined audio + video data rate.

     

    2) In the "Automatic" data rate mode, the file size is directly proportional to the dimensions of the encode matrix.

     

    3) When the combined total data rate is held to a constant target limit, files are of a reasonbly constant size as long as this limit is less that the "optimum" automatic audio and video data rate defaults programmed into the application. (I.e., File size is directly proportional to the total combined audio + video data rate.)

     

    And, if you had included a subjective indication of the output quality, you would have also found that...

     

    4) When the combined total data rate is held to a constant target limit, the video quality of each file is inversely proportionate to dimensions used to encode the file, and

     

    5) In the "Automatic" data rate mode, the video quality of each file tends to remain reasonably constant as the encode dimensions vary.

     

    The basic rule of thumb here is that if your goal is to reduce the size of a compressed file, then you must recompress the file data to lower data rates.

     

    SJAUG.png

    iMac, OS X Mountain Lion, 3.4 GHz Quad Core i7, 12GB 1333 MHz

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