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What Cache can I trash to make room on my harddrive?

593 Views 7 Replies Latest reply: Jan 28, 2013 3:44 PM by MichelPM RSS
tarmar Level 1 Level 1 (25 points)
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Jan 28, 2013 11:51 AM

My cache file is huge! I've heard you can trash it but that was a while back. I'm not 100% certain. TIA

MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.8)
  • babowa Level 7 Level 7 (22,095 points)
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    Jan 28, 2013 11:56 AM (in response to tarmar)

    What cache are you talking about? Browser cache can be deleted at any time (I do mine once a day when I quit the browser) - it used to be that caching helped load websites faster, but with today's faster internet connections as well as faster processors, etc, that really isn't relevant any longer.

     

    If it's not the browser, what are you talking about (screenshots would help).

     

    On the whole though, videos, music, etc take up more space on your hard drive than the cache. Please remember: you need an absolute minimum of 10 - 15 GB of space empty and available at all times for the OS to function properly.

  • rkaufmann87 Level 8 Level 8 (40,620 points)
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    Jan 28, 2013 12:13 PM (in response to tarmar)

    Restart in Safe Mode, this will clear some caches. However caches are harmless and in most cases are extremely small.

  • babowa Level 7 Level 7 (22,095 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 28, 2013 1:16 PM (in response to tarmar)

    In backing up my iPhone I'm running out of space on the HD so I'm looking for any thing I can get rid of. Any tips on that?

     

    Yes! Put your space hogging files (videos, music, graphics, pics) on an external hard drive permanently. After you've done that and made sure they are working, delete them on your internal hard drive. As an example, how to move your iTunes media folder:

     

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1449

     

    iMovie:

     

    http://support.apple.com/kb/PH2302

     

    iPhoto:

     

    http://support.apple.com/kb/PH2506

     

    Do not add anything to your hard drive until and after you have gained a minimum of 10 - 15 GB of free space (add to that whatever else you are wanting to download or back up). If you continue and run out of space, your Mac will not run.

  • MichelPM Level 5 Level 5 (7,145 points)
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    Jan 28, 2013 3:14 PM (in response to tarmar)

    you are going to have to delete, move or archive your data to regain at least 15-20 GBs of empty hard drive space.

    Have you emptied your iMac's Trash icon in the Dock?

    If you use iPhoto, iPhoto has its own trash that needs to be emptied, also.

    If you use Apple Mail app, Apple Mail also has its own trash area that needs to be emptied, too!

    Other things you can do to gain space.

    Delete any old or no longer needed emails and/or archive older emails you want to save.

    Look through your Documents folder and delete any type of old useless type files like "Read Me" type files.

    Again, archive or delete any old documents you no longer use or immediately need.

    Download an app called OnyX for your version of OS X.

    When you install and launch it, let it do its thing initially, then go to the cleaning and maintenance tabs and run all of the processes in the tabs. Let OnyX clean out all web browser cache files, web browser histories, system cache files, delete old error log files.

    Typically, iTunes and iPhoto libraries are the biggest users of HD space.

    You may have to Purchase an external FireWire or Thunderbolt hard drive to move these files/data off of your internal drive to the external hard drive and deleted off of the internal hard drive.

    If you have any other large folders of personal data or projects, these should be moved, also, to the external hard drive and then either archived to disc and/or deleted off your internal hard drive.

    Good Luck!

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (107,930 points)
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    Jan 28, 2013 3:21 PM (in response to tarmar)

    Remove the "MacKeeper" crapware as follows. First, back up all data.

    "MacKeeper" has only one useful feature: it deletes itself.

    Note: These instructions apply to the version of the product that I downloaded and tested in early 2012. I can't be sure that they apply to other versions.

    IMPORTANT: "MacKeeper" has what the developer calls an “encryption” feature. In my tests, I didn't try to verify what this feature really does. If you used it to “encrypt” any of your files, “decrypt” them before you uninstall, or (preferably) restore the files from backups made before they were “encrypted.” As the developer is not trustworthy, you should assume that the "decrypted" files are corrupt unless proven otherwise.

    In the Finder, select Go Applications from the menu bar, or press the key combination shift-command-A. The "MacKeeper" application is in the folder that opens. Quit it if it's running, then drag it to the Trash. You'll be prompted for your login password. Then a dialog will pop up asking why you want to uninstall it. You don't have to provide that information. Enter anything you like in the text box, then click the Uninstall MacKeeper button. All the functional components of the software will be deleted. Reboot.

    Do not try to uninstall by dragging the MacKeeper icon in the Dock or the LaunchPad to the Trash.

    Here are some general suggestions. If you want your computer to be usable, don't install crapware, such as “themes,” "haxies," “add-ons,” “toolbars,” “enhancers," “optimizers,” "tune-ups," “accelerators,” “extenders,” “cleaners,” “defragmenters,” “firewalls,” "barriers," “guardians,” “defenders,” “protectors,” most “plugins,” commercial "virus scanners,” "disk tools," or "utilities." With very few exceptions, this kind of material is useless, or worse than useless.

    The more actively promoted the product, the more likely it is to be garbage. The most extreme example is the “MacKeeper” scam.

    The only software you should install is that which directly enables you to do the things you use a computer for — such as creating, communicating, and playing — and does not modify the way other software works. Never install any third-party software unless you know how to uninstall it.

  • MichelPM Level 5 Level 5 (7,145 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 28, 2013 3:44 PM (in response to tarmar)

    Yeah Linc,

    I missed that!

    Completely uninstall MacKeeper.

    It is utter, complete crapware!!!

    Get rid of it!! You do not need this and your iMac doesn't need this.

    This app could be causing you many additional problems and issues.

    Good Luck!

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