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MacBook Pro Logic Board Failure

483153 Views 1,307 Replies Latest reply: Apr 19, 2014 7:22 AM by G309903 RSS Branched to a new discussion.
  • Anic264b Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 5:25 AM (in response to StinkyOldC)

    I have such a 2008 model, so I know that. But, when I got my graphics card failure, about two years ago, the logic card was still fine (if you refer to the “logic card” as “all but the graphics circuitry”). I could start my Mac, only without video. I could, by guessing, log into my session, but not do much than restart with the power key and <return key>.

    I don't understand this assumption that a soldered gpu failure would take the remaining logic board down, especially since it didn't on my MBP. Even soldered, it's a graphics peripheral, the main CPU, RAM (etc.) don't require it to run, like a regular graphics card (I can be wrong, but my explanation seems both in accordance to my experience and logical).

  • Anic264b Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 5:26 AM (in response to macssam)

    You don't even need to be connected to the Internet to use a computer; does that count as manipulation to you?

  • Shootist007 Level 6 Level 6 (16,640 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 7:09 AM (in response to Anic264b)

    If you read this thread, I know it is long so browse through this thread, you will find posts where the Apple Genius diagnosis was Logic board failure and some of those people BAKED, Yes in an Oven, their affected MBPs and got it to come back to life. The failure of the graphics chip can effect the complete system.

     

    And by the way Apple still soldered both the GPU and CPU to the logic board. No sockets like in other make notebooks. They more then likely do that with all there system, notebooks and iMac, except maybe the Mac Pro line, which is dead anyway.

    Anic264b wrote:

     

    I have such a 2008 model, so I know that. But, when I got my graphics card failure, about two years ago, the logic card was still fine (if you refer to the “logic card” as “all but the graphics circuitry”). I could start my Mac, only without video. I could, by guessing, log into my session, but not do much than restart with the power key and <return key>.

    I don't understand this assumption that a soldered gpu failure would take the remaining logic board down, especially since it didn't on my MBP. Even soldered, it's a graphics peripheral, the main CPU, RAM (etc.) don't require it to run, like a regular graphics card (I can be wrong, but my explanation seems both in accordance to my experience and logical).

  • Dino1956 Level 1 Level 1 (40 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 7:49 AM (in response to Shootist007)

    I think my situation is different than most here. If I manage to get a full boot without crashing, the MBP will stay working for several days if I leave it on & just let it sleep. But as soon as I watch Netflix or sometime even a long YouTube Video, I get the freeze up & checkered Boxes & Lines graphics glitch. So in my case, it's quite obvious it's the GPU. When it gets hot it gives up the ghost. I have downloaded smc fan control & keep fans running at 3200 RPM & it will stay on & working indefinitely as long as I don't play a Video. So in my case, I THINK the GPU is overheating. I could be wrong, because sometimes even if the MBP is started after cooling down & off for several hours, I will still get the Graphics Checkered Glitch on the Apple when booting up & then it just keeps trying to restart. But if I keep on trying to boot with the Power button, I will get it to boot up. Just to give you an idea that once it's working, it usually stays working, I was able to Install a clean copy of Mountain Lion with not one glitch.

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,375 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 7:57 AM (in response to Shootist007)

    Shootist007 wrote:

     

     

     

    And by the way Apple still soldered both the GPU and CPU to the logic board. No sockets like in other make notebooks. They more then likely do that with all there system, notebooks and iMac, except maybe the Mac Pro line, which is dead anyway.

     

    Which 'Other' notebooks use socketed CPU and GPU, we'd like to know.

  • Cori_S Calculating status...
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 8:02 AM (in response to Keith Walsh)

    I am having the same issue as those have mentioned above. My iMac was purchased 10/2011 and the logic board died early this month (1/2013). The computer is under 18 months old and Apple is refusing to repair it free-of-cost because the machine is just out of warranty. This is the second issue I've had with a computer logic board dying: my Mac laptop logic board died in 2006, again under 18 months old and required repair. There is obviously an issue with some of the logic boards being produced with Apple. I shouldn't have to feel like I have to purchase a warrantee when I purchase an item. Warrantees should be insurance against unforeseen problems that arise out normal age. As consumers, we've come to expect that computers will last a minimum of three years, at which point we're going to replace it with a newer operating system and faster CPU. It is a great concern that Apple products seem to be breaking down faster than industry norms.

     

    It is unacceptable in my mind that Apple doesn't feel responsible to produce a peice of hardware that can last at minimum three years and to replace that peice of hardware when it doesn't make it this long. When I buy a computer, I expect it to last at least a few years without any major problems.

     

    When I initially took the computer in, I was told that I would have to replace the power supply. I questioned why this would be an issue and was told that Hurrican Sandy created a lot of "dirty" energy that's causing hardware failures. I was dissapointed with this answer - since, as I told them, the computer was always plugged in to a surge protector - but I didn't want to expend time and energy arguing.

     

    When the issue turned out to be the logic board and not the power supply, I stated that this shouldn't be happening and the response was that they agreed, but there was nothing they could do, referring to computer failures as if they were an ethereal, mystical force at work that no one has any control or understanding of. Computer issues happen because of bad hardware or mistreatment of that hardware. It's as simple as that. There are no computer gremlins causing my computer to fail. It sits on a desk all day and so any issues that are ocurring are due to bad hardware. It should be expected that hardware should last, not that it will fail and I have to purchase a warranty to cover it. If these logic board failures are going to happen as frequently as they appear to - based on everyone's response above - then the warranty that comes with the computer should be longer to begin with.


    I have been a Mac user for many years, because I generally like the operating system. I have converted one office over to Macs and was going to try to convert another, but after this, I'm seriously considering moving to PC. It is no longer worth the extra money to pay for an Apple when the device can't make it even a third of the length of time that most HP computers last. I'm terribly dissapointed. There have always been problems with Macs, but in the past, customer service and the so-called "Geniuses" have dealt with this fairly and responsibly. Since Steve Job's passing, customer service has been dissapointing (rude, unhelpful), tech support has been incompetent (it takes them a long time and many tries to figure out the issue), poor quality control (hardware failures), and weak product rollout (Apple Maps for the iPhone 5).

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,375 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 8:22 AM (in response to lenn5)

    lenn5 wrote:

     

    The Nvidia test they do doesn't cost a thing.

    How ridiculous can this get, do you imagine that the employees work for free, that Apple don't have to pay for the store you take it to .... How Can It Be Free.

     

    Try to get out more.

  • StinkyOldC Calculating status...
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 8:59 AM (in response to Csound1)

    Of course it's free it's to test for a faulty gpu that apple acknowledge is in some if their machines. Takes a couple if minutes to run from a flash drive. I take it you werent affected by the faulty gpu issue otherwise you would have a civil tongue in your mouth and be more sympathetic to the problem.Take your own advice and get out more ... <edited by host>

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,375 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 9:01 AM (in response to StinkyOldC)

    StinkyOldC wrote:

     

    Of course it's free it's to test for a faulty gpu that apple acknowledge is in some if their machines. Takes a couple if minutes to run from a flash drive. I take it you werent affected by the faulty gpu issue otherwise you would have a civil tongue in your mouth and be more sympathetic to the problem.Take your own advice and get out more ... Moron

    It is not free of cost to Apple, employees have to be paid, taxes have to be paid, bills have to be paid. You may not understand how a business works but that is your shortcoming.

     

    StinkyOldC wrote:

     

    <edited by host>

    Look in the mirror.

  • StinkyOldC Level 2 Level 2 (155 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 8:55 AM (in response to Csound1)

    Dont patronise me, I'm fully aware of how a business is run seeing as I run my own successful one! This test is free because apple sold a computer by their own admission which is defective. So of course this test should and has been for the most part done for free! You would change your tune if you spent £1500 on a laptop that went belly up. But your to busy here telling everyone to get out more... Very helpful I must say!

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,375 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 8:59 AM (in response to StinkyOldC)

    StinkyOldC wrote:

     

    Dont patronise me, I'm fully aware of how a business is run seeing as I run my own successful one!

     

     

    StinkyOldC wrote:

     

    Of course it's free it's to test for a faulty gpu that apple acknowledge

    No need to patronize, you already laid the groundwork.

     

    Good luck with whatever it is that you want Mr Businessman

  • StinkyOldC Level 2 Level 2 (155 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 9:00 AM (in response to Csound1)

    And he's got the gall to tell people here to get out more lol.... Purleeese!

  • StinkyOldC Level 2 Level 2 (155 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 9:05 AM (in response to Csound1)

    15000 points? Who needs to get out more?? Lol

  • lenn5 Level 4 Level 4 (2,530 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 10:33 AM (in response to Csound1)

    Don't comment on things you know nothing about. Have you ever taken your MBP in to have the NVidia test done? I have. And it didn't cost a dime. Took less than 2 minutes.

  • lenn5 Level 4 Level 4 (2,530 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 31, 2013 10:35 AM (in response to Csound1)

    Dude pay attention. It's free to the owner of the Mac! You are the only one taking about employees getting paid by Apple for their time. Read more carefully next time.

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