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Stems with Automation

587 Views 12 Replies Latest reply: Feb 2, 2013 12:23 AM by léonie RSS
Strawman31 Calculating status...
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Jan 31, 2013 8:27 AM

I have exported individual tracks from garageband to send as stems to a producer. He is telling me that the stems do not contain the volume automation that was assigned to each track....Is it possible to export stems that contain the automation and effects assigned to them?

 

   Any help would be very much appreciated.

 

                                                                                   Thanks!

MacBook Pro
  • Edgar Level 3 Level 3 (965 points)
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    Jan 31, 2013 10:39 AM (in response to Strawman31)

    Exporting Stems or the whole mix is just a different word. Technically it is the same process, you are exporting (bouncing, mixing) your song. You just decide the TRACKS (include all of them or only a selection) and the RANGE (from beginning to end, or  only a section)


    When exporting a stem, you just solo one Track (same as muting all the other track). All the Effects and the Automation on that Track are part of the export unless you specifically disable them.


     

    Hope that helps

     

    Edgar Rothermich

    http://DingDingMusic.com/Manuals/

    'I may receive some form of compensation, financial or otherwise, from my recommendation or link.'

  • Christoph Drösser Level 6 Level 6 (11,270 points)
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    Feb 1, 2013 3:02 AM (in response to Strawman31)

    Go to GB's advanced preferences and uncheck the "export at full volume" option (or whatever it is called in English, my system is German.)

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,475 points)
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    Feb 1, 2013 7:56 AM (in response to Christoph Drösser)

    Christoph, it's

    "Auto Normalize: Export projects at full loudness"

    in English.

    Screen Shot 2013-02-01 at 16.54.08.png

    Cheers

    Léonie

  • Edgar Level 3 Level 3 (965 points)
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    Feb 1, 2013 11:47 AM (in response to léonie)

    I just want to point out that the wording used in GarageBand is ok for the understanding if you are a casual user. However from a technical point of view, it is a bit problematic to use the term loudness in this context.


    Signal Level

    This is a value that can be measured for an audio signal, either with a VU meter or a LED Peak meter. In digital audio, the meter looks at the digital samples of the audio signal and determines their value where "all bits set to 1" is defined as 0dBFS. (There are a few more details about how many samples are measured to determine that value, but I don't want to get into that)


    Technically you cannot go over 0dBFS, The only thing you end up is a string of all 1s (every sample at full bit resolution). So even if there is no "over 0dB", that "over" state is defined in many LED meters how many consecutive samples of full bit occur. Each system defines it different, that threshold when the red "over" LED lights up.


    Normalize

    This is a common procedure in digital audio where the program analyzes the audio signal of an audio file (or soon to be audio file during the export) to determines the highest signal level in order to determine the headroom to 0dBFS. Whatever that headroom is (i.e. -6dB), it applies that offset and raises the level of the audio file by that amount (i.e. 6dB) so the highest signal level of the audio file is now at max 0dB. It is the same effect as if you would raise the master fader by that amount.


    Loudness

    Loudness describes not how loud an audio signal is but how loud you perceive it. You can have two audio signals with the same signal level but one can sound louder that the other. This has to do how our ear works (described wight the Fletcher-Munson curves or Isophones). A compressor and limiter are tools to increase the loudness while maintaining a specific signal level (range). Old HiFi systems (they don't make them anymore) had a "loudness" button that would increase the lower frequency when you listen with a lower volume (to compensate the Isophones' effect).



    Long story short, Normalize does NOT increase the loudness as it says in the GarageBand preference window. It makes the audio file sound louder by increasing the signal level. Some might think this is just a word, but some words are established terms and GarageBand misuses some terms or does not use other established terms just to make it easier for the casual music producer. In my opinion that is very unfortunate and not really necessary. Learning and using the correct terms doesn't make the app more difficult to understand - I think.

     

     

    Hope that clarifies things

     

    Edgar Rothermich

    http://DingDingMusic.com/Manuals/

    'I may receive some form of compensation, financial or otherwise, from my recommendation or link.'


  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,475 points)
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    Feb 1, 2013 12:02 PM (in response to Edgar)

    Long story short, Normalize does NOT increase the loudness as it says in the GarageBand preference window

    Right Edgar, but the question was, what the english label of the interface element in GarageBand is, not what it does.

  • Edgar Level 3 Level 3 (965 points)
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    Feb 1, 2013 12:34 PM (in response to léonie)

    I know, I just thought I give a little bit background info for the reader while we are that subject, propagating the proper use of established terminology (starting with Apple itself !)

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,475 points)
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    Feb 1, 2013 12:44 PM (in response to Edgar)

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,475 points)
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    Feb 1, 2013 1:49 PM (in response to léonie)

    Completely off-topic:

    Apple is sometimes really not good at the precise terminology. In the Aperture forum we have quite a few threads on misleading metaphors. Apple likes to pick terms, that have an established meaning in the professional community, and to use this term for adjustments, that are poorly document with respect to the algorithm performed. For example, it is completely unclear, what the "exposure" adjustment will do to an image. That is why I am not fully convinced, that the "Auto normalize" will really only do a normalize like you describe. It might actually use a weighted  characteristic curve of the frequency sensitivity of the human eye and adjust the signal level to increase loudness.

  • Christoph Drösser Level 6 Level 6 (11,270 points)
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    Feb 1, 2013 11:39 PM (in response to léonie)

    Eye?

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,475 points)
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    Feb 2, 2013 12:23 AM (in response to Christoph Drösser)

    Eye?

    Ear! You are great at proof reading, Christoph! Much better than auto completion or dictionary look-up.

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