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How can I backup my Mac ONTO my PC using Time Machine?

626 Views 14 Replies Latest reply: Feb 1, 2013 1:45 PM by OGELTHORPE RSS Branched to a new discussion.
Tommy Bradly Calculating status...
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Feb 1, 2013 10:49 AM

I have a Macbook Pro running 10.7.4 and I'm connected to my PC running Windows 7 via Ethernet - how can I use Time Machine to backup my 250GB mac onto my PC for storage? Is it simple? Attached is the message I recieve when I try to connect to my PC.
Help!

 

Screen Shot 2013-02-01 at 18.48.25.png

MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.7.4)
  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,595 points)

    If you can, and I have my doubts, first the PC HDD has to be formatted FAT or EXFAT.  Then open System Preferences>Time Machine>Select Disk and see if the PC is recognized.

     

    Ciao.

     

    A separate HDD in an enclosure would seem the better solution.

     

    Message was edited by: OGELTHORPE

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,305 points)

    You don't.

     

    TimeMachine only works with HFS+ Mac formatted drives as a primary backup system of the boot drive to a another external drive.

     

    Although it can also backup other drives onto it, it's not receommended.

     

    It's not designed to work with a PC or their drive formats, it's for Mac newbies backup basically.

     

     

    What you have is your Mac with a HFS+ formatted drive connected to a PC with a NTFS formatted drive.

     

    Neither operating system can write to those other formats although the Mac can read NTFS format without extra and problematic software installed

     

     

    Even then, since TimeMachine backups up the entire boot drive, OS X, programs and files, you don't want all that on your PC anyway it will wipe the PC drive in the process if it could if Windows wasn't in the way.

     

    If you want to backup files or transfer them to a PC, use a external exFAT formatted drive (done on the PC) and drag and drop (or copy and paste) files and folders from the Mac to the exFAT drive, then connect it to the PC and do the same.

     

    Some file formats made with Mac only programs will not open on a PC, unless first saved in compatible cross platform file formats first.

     

    Most commonly used backup methods

     

    .Drives, partitions, formatting w/Mac's + PC's

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,385 points)

    OGELTHORPE wrote:

     

    If you can, and I have my doubts, first the PC HDD has to be formatted FAT or EXFAT.  Then open System Preferences>Time Machine>Select Disk and see if the PC is recognized.

     

    Ciao.

     

    A separate HDD in an enclosure would seem the better solution.

     

    Message was edited by: OGELTHORPE

    The drive must be formatted as HFS+, Windows formatted drives won't work.

  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,595 points)

    Csound1, greetings:  May I assume that FAT and EXFAT formatted HDDs will not run inside a PC but only externally?  Or put another way, Why HFS+ and not FAT or EXFAT.  I voluntarily admit to limited PC knowledge (and maybe Mac as well).  Seriously, do educate me!

     

    Ciao.

  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,595 points)

    All Time Machine questions can be answered on this website:

     

    http://pondini.org/TM/Home.html

     

    Ciao.

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,385 points)

    OGELTHORPE wrote:

     

    Csound1, greetings:  May I assume that FAT and EXFAT formatted HDDs will not run inside a PC but only externally?  Or put another way, Why HFS+ and not FAT or EXFAT.  I voluntarily admit to limited PC knowledge (and maybe Mac as well).  Seriously, do educate me!

     

    Ciao.

    TM requires a Mac formatted drive or a NAS (most NAS do not work, but Time Capsule is a NAS that does)

     

    Fat won't be found inside a modern PC (NTFS took over) and eXFat is for SD cards and such, I would not use eXFat for anything that mattered.

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,385 points)

    Tommy Bradly wrote:

     

    Bah, screw it! I'll buy a drive caddy and back up onto this new drive I have. It'll save time and effort at the price of a few bucks, that I can handle!

     

    So, I install my new hard drive into the caddy, back up via USB through Time Machine to that?

    Provided that the drive is formatted for use with a Mac (HFS+) it will work.

  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,595 points)

    Csound1, greetings;  You said "I would not use eXFat for anything that mattered."  What is you displeasure regarding EXFAT?

     

    Ciao.

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,385 points)

    OGELTHORPE wrote:

     

    Csound1, greetings;  You said "I would not use eXFat for anything that mattered."  What is you displeasure regarding EXFAT?

     

    Ciao.

    Only one File allocation table, inefficient space handling (esp. on larger partitions)

     

    It was designed for removable storage devices. It is fine for moving stuff, I would not commit to it for longer term storage.

     

    A little more detail follows:

    Disadvantages

    The disadvantages compared to FAT file systems include:

    • Microsoft has not released the official exFAT file system specification, and a restrictive license from Microsoft is required in order to make and distribute exFAT implementations. Microsoft also asserts patents on exFAT which make it impossible to re-implement its functionality in a compatible way without violating a large percentage of them.[12] This renders the implementation, distribution, and use of exFAT as a part of free or open-source operating systems or of commercial software, for which the vendors could not obtain a license from Microsoft, not only technically difficult, but legally impossible in countries that recognize United States software patents.
    • Limited or no support outside Windows and Mac OS X operating systems as of 2012, when most consumer electronic devices could only handle FAT12/FAT16/FAT32, rendering exFAT (and flash memory formats using it) impractical as a universal exchange format.
    • Older Windows NT versions up to Windows Vista without Service Pack 1 do not support exFAT.
    • Windows Vista is unable to use exFAT drives for ReadyBoost. Windows 7 removes this limitation, enabling ReadyBoost caches larger than 4 GiB.[13]
    • The standard exFAT implementation only uses a single file allocation table and free space map. FAT file systems instead used alternating tables, as this allowed recovery of the file system if the media was ejected during a write (which occurs frequently in practice with removable media). The optional TexFAT component adds support for additional backup tables and maps, but may not be supported.
    • Support for up to 2,796,202 files per subdirectory only.[1][nb 3] Microsoft documents a limit of 65,534 files per sub-directory for their FAT32 implementation, but other operating systems have no special limit for the number of files in a FAT32 directory. FAT32 implementations in other operating systems allow an unlimited number of files up to the number of available clusters (that is, up to 268,304,373 files on volumes without long filenames).[nb 4]
    • More complex design results in higher code footprint and memory usage compared to FAT implementations.[nb 5]
  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,595 points)

    Csound1, greetings:  Grazie, grazie amico.

     

    Ciao.

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,385 points)

    Prego.

     

    Congratulazioni per il livellamento

  • AnaMusic Level 9 Level 9 (55,205 points)

    Hi OGELTHORPE

     

    Just noticed you have attained Level 6... Congratulations

     

    AM

  • OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (22,595 points)

    Csound1 & AnaMusic, greetings;  Thank you, but I did slip in through the side door as evidenced by this post.

     

    Ciao.

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