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Where are the thunderbolt HDD enclosures and other peripherals ?

99481 Views 190 Replies Latest reply: Apr 15, 2014 10:46 AM by Csound1 RSS Branched to a new discussion.
  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,310 points)

    Phillip Lovgren wrote:

     

    It shouldn't void the AppleCare warranty

    It will void the Apple warranty.

  • sbywalt Calculating status...

    Phillip and Csound1,

     

    Thank you to both of you.  As to the OWC option, this would be an excellent option for those who live closer to OWC than Hawaii, where I live.  So, for me, the shiping cost to OWC would be substantial.  Even considering the free return shipping, I would need to pay the shipping cost to OWC, which would probably cost more than the $30 extra needed to buy the LaCie hub.

     

    For those who have not yet purchased SATA drives, or for those who already own SATA 6 Gb/sec drives, the OWC option would be quite atttractive, even considering the shipping cost.  However, my drives are all SATA 3 Gb/sec drives, so without buying new drives, the extra speed would be a waste for me.

     

    Then of course, there is the warranty voiding issue, as noted by Csound 1 (thanks for this valuable information, Csound 1).

     

    So, while this option would be a good one for others, for me, it seems like I am still stuck with the $200 that I must pay to LaCie.  Actually, saying "stuck with" is not really fair, because Lacie makes excellent products in my experience.

     

    I have always been very satisfied with LaCie products, so, unless someone can suggest a less expensive option within the next month or so, I think that I will go ahead and buy the LaCie hub.  The more I think about it, the more I like it.

     

    So, what do the rest of you think about the LaCie Thunderbolt hub?  So far, I really like it (although I wish that it cost less).

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,310 points)

    Until there is a cheap, good TBolt hub the LaCie is reasonable, have you seen the price of the Belkin TBolt hub?

  • Phillip Lovgren Calculating status...

    Csound1 wrote:

     

    Phillip Lovgren wrote:

     

    It shouldn't void the AppleCare warranty

    It will void the Apple warranty.

    I read my AppleCare Protection Plan limitations for my 2011 27" iMac on page 14 b.

     

    It states that damage caused by unauthorized modification is not covered under Apple's warranty.

     

    So unauthorized modifications do not automatically void your Apple warranty. There has to be cause and effect shown or at least a reasonable conclusion that the unauthorized upgrade caused the otherwise warranted damage.

     

    And you can take that to court!

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,310 points)

    It's your interpretation, I don't agree.

  • gen_ Level 2 Level 2 (335 points)

    sbywalt wrote:

     

    gen_

     

    Thanks for your reply.  This pretty much explains the entire conundrum to me.  It pretty much looks like the combination of: (1) the Intel licencing fee; and (2) the appearance of USB 3, will kill off any possible chance for Thunderbolt enclosure pricing in the $60 range that I was used to paying for external eSATA enclosures.

     

    Because Mac Pros became so expensive relative to iMacs, and because iMacs became so much faster, I finally moved from buying tower-style Macs (Mac 9500, Mac G4, and Mac G5), and instead bought an iMac for the first time (thinking that I could eventually buy an inexpensive Thunderbolt enclosure, or at least some means of connecting my eSATA RAID Level 0 volume to my iMac).

     

    Those who buy current iMacs have a perfect external solution by simply using USB 3.  However, the particular generation of iMacs that I own do not have USB 3 connections (only Thunderbolt, Firewire 800, and USB 2.0).  So, I am stuck with either settling for a relatively slow Firewire 800 external volume, or still trying to avoid spending more on a Thunderbolt RAID level 0 volume than my entire iMac originally cost.

     

    So, it seems to me that the lesser of the evils is to buy the Thunderbolt hub that LaCie sells for $200.  Therefore, it looks like we will all need to get used to the idea that, what used to cost $60 (an eSATA enclosure) will now cost us $200 (a Thunderbolt hub) plus the cost of an external enclosure.

     

    I guess that I will just have to accept the fact that I will need to spend $200 in order to connect my RAID level 0 volume to my iMac.  And, for my $200 I will gain the benefit of extra speed that I really do not need.  And also, this extra speed is speed that that my eSATA RAID level 0 volume (composed of 7,200 RPM hard drives) cannot really take advantage of.

     

    Am I right, or am I missing an alternative, less expensive, solution for connecting my RAID level 0 volume to my iMac that lacks a USB 3 connection (and whose only external connection options are Thunderbolt, Firewire 800, and USB 2.0)?

    You pretty much summed it up correctly, unfortunately. Interestingly enough, what I said earlier in this post has been read and blogged here (without giving credit) http://camerarentalz.com/diy-thunderbolt-esata-adapter/ with pictures and a clearer guide to what I was suggesting much earlier in this thread.

     

    With the aforementioned adapter, you should be able to use an eSATA enclosurev perfectly. If they pull it from the market, (which is likely seeing as it's massively undercutting even thier own products of the same type) the situation for iMac users will be precisely as you said it.

     

    This is why I still chug along with my old Pro; modularity. But then I have to deal with the occasional click and pop so I can keep the UAD card and a bunch of PCIe hardware I cannot fathom abandoning. My faith in Apple has been being chipped at since Snow.

  • gen_ Level 2 Level 2 (335 points)

    Phillip Lovgren wrote:

     

    Csound1 wrote:

     

    Phillip Lovgren wrote:

     

    It shouldn't void the AppleCare warranty

    It will void the Apple warranty.

    I read my AppleCare Protection Plan limitations for my 2011 27" iMac on page 14 b.

     

    It states that damage caused by unauthorized modification is not covered under Apple's warranty.

     

    So unauthorized modifications do not automatically void your Apple warranty. There has to be cause and effect shown or at least a reasonable conclusion that the unauthorized upgrade caused the otherwise warranted damage.

     

    And you can take that to court!

     

    As the creators of the product, it is thier judgement as to whether the unauthorized upgrade causes unwarranted damage. At face value thier emplyoees will simply refuse you a replacement product. In a court of law, because the deed has already been done, you will have to DIS prove thier statement in order to get your replacement, not the other way around. Without the source code of the software, circuit diagrams of the logic board and technical understaning of a near Wozniak level, you would not be able to DISprove beyond reasonable doubt that your damage was NOT caused by the unauthorized item. Then there are the complications... what about the chips that arent designed by Apple (easily over 90% of them), what about the environment it was in... you need to bring an expert in to fringe test the hardware etc. etc.

     

    The problem is it would easily cost over a million dollars just to see that case through, due to having to bring a rep from everyone that's involved in the manufacturing of a Mac to the stand and it being a guaranteed class action suit if it doesn't get thrown out to start with... Not to mention a very high chance of failing even then.

     

    I recommend against taking that route. It's much simpler to just put the stock gear back in before you go for a warranty check.

  • Phillip Lovgren Level 4 Level 4 (1,310 points)

    The burdon of proof in court as to wether the upgrade caused the damage would be upon Apple not the customer.

     

    An employee of Apple could deny warranty(for any reason) but contacting your state attorney generals office and the FTC would be a good first step in bringing Apple into compliance with the law.

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,310 points)

    Why don't you just ask Apple if fitting 3rd party interfaces (internally) affects the warranty coverage, that's all you need to know.

  • gen_ Level 2 Level 2 (335 points)

    Apple have already responded to this many times. Yes.

     

    You realise they refuse to service Macs with new RAM in them unless you remove the RAM and put the stock chips back in before you return to them.

     

    The case does not even get as far as whether the upgrade casues damage as Apple specified what items were user replaceable parts in the long version of its warranty agreement (Available at your Apple Store) and the replacement of anything else is a breach of that. The internal User Serviceable parts are Hard Drive and RAM modules, and Apple will refuse t replace them as a result but the rest of your Mac is still under warranty. Obviously if you live in a country with statutory rights that override thierinvalidation of your warranty due to the servicing of non-user-serviceable parts then they still stand, but in a country where there is only a legal requirement to provide warranty up to 14/30/90 days like mine then this is all irrelevant and your case will fall on it's face becasue you have to make a case modification and Apple can argue that makes the inside of the case vulnerable to external damage even if it's just from EM/Radio and static etc.

  • parkerpress Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)

    gen_ wrote:

     

    Apple have already responded to this many times. Yes.

     

    You realise they refuse to service Macs with new RAM in them unless you remove the RAM and put the stock chips back in before you return to them.

    This is not  true. I have had multiple macs repaired, under warranty, when I had replaced RAM, upgraded hard drives. I've enven had one machine repaired where I had replaced the CD/DVD with a second drive using OWC's mounting hardware. Not once have I had them refuse, or even question, my upgrades.

     

    Steve

  • dysanfel Calculating status...

    My graphics card went out on my 2009 27' iMac and Apple would not repair it at any price because I upgraded the hard drive myself. They even had the gaul to say that if I tried to put back in the old drive they would know and still refuse service. I went to a ex-Apple certified tech who runs a booming business off Apple's lack of service.

     

    In 2007 Apple repaired my MBP that I had upgraded the HD. Heck, they even replaced the battery out of warranty back then. Today, Apple has got too big for their britches. They have stopped caring or trying as hard as they used to. It will be their downfall eventually.

     

    I have bought my first and last iMac. Next upgrade will be a Hackintosh. Funny six years and the death of Steve has changed things.

  • Csound1 Level 7 Level 7 (32,310 points)

    gen_ wrote:

     

    Apple have already responded to this many times. Yes.

     

    You realise they refuse to service Macs with new RAM in them unless you remove the RAM and put the stock chips back in before you return to them.

    That has not been my experience.

  • sbywalt Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    gen- I think that your decision to chug along with your MacPro is brilliant.  I had always stuck with the tower designs for exactly the reasons you list (but mainly, modularity).  I went from a Mac 9500 to a Mac G4, and then from a G4 to a G5.  My G5 lasted forever because I just kept upgrading it.  Even at the end,it was still acceptably fast.  The thing that finally did it in was the switch to Intel microprocessors.  I should have bought an Intel Mac Pro as soon as they came out when they were still relativley inexpensive.

     

    But, once my G5 was unable to run all that much new software, I had to upgrade to an Intel machine.  But, note that the G5 was still humming along, as reliable as ever, and still quite fast.  So, I went to look at new Mac Pros and was shocked at how expensive they had become, relative to iMacs.  Also, iMacs had gotten much faster relative to Mac Pros.  So, now I know that I should have done exactly as you:  I should have stuck with the trusty old tower design and bought a Mac Pro irrespective of the price.  But, what seduced me into buying an iMac was the fact that, in effect, one gets a FREE $1,000 display.  In other words, for about the same price as a Mac Pro of roughly equivalent speed, one can buy an iMac, display included.  But, if one buys a Mac Pro (back when I was making this decision) the price was about the same, and the speed was about the same, but one would have to still fork out an additional $1,000 in order to buy the display that the iMac has (and has a t no extra charge).  So, I just could not stand the idea of paying an extra $1,000 for a machine that was roughly equivalent in performance (or, so I thought).  AND, the iMac had these two nifty little Thunderbolt Ports that would solve all of my upgrade desires.  Silly me!

     

    But, now I see the error of my ways.  Had I stuck with the trusty MacPro design, I would not be in the **** that I am in every time I want to add a fast external hard drive or SSD.  But, I guess that it is not all that bad.  After all, I can finally actually use those Thunderbolt ports with coughing up $1,200 for a hardware RAID system.  Now I have the option to use the LaCie Thunderbolt empty box for $200 which will allow me to use my ESATA form my G5.  I guess that I am more or less mollified.  I would not want anyone to mistake me for one of the serious malcontents who have also added their voices to this thread.  For the record, I love Apple (yes, even the sans-Steve Apple, I loved my G5, I love my iMac, despite my misgivings about the lack of affordable Thunderbolt hardware, and I even think that the LaCie hub is a good idea, a useful device, and a reasonably good buy (but I wich that it cost $100, and I really need to buy one now, if this stuff about them pulling it from the market is true).

     

    Walt

  • sbywalt Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    PS  I could not figure out how to edit the above message, so, sorry about the several typos and the us of "with" when I wanted to say "without," etc.

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