11 Replies Latest reply: Feb 8, 2013 4:45 PM by OGELTHORPE
woodlee Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

I have a MacBook Pro w/ Mac OS X 10.4.11. Is there a way to upgrade hardware so I can upgrade software?


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.4.11)
  • 1. Re: Can anyone answer this question?
    Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (226,765 points)

    You can add more RAM if you haven't already and you could replace the hard drive. That would be it. Any other upgrades would require you to purchase a newer computer.

  • 2. Re: Can anyone answer this question?
    woodlee Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I currently have 1 GB 667 Mhz DDR2 SDRAM and 2 GHz Intel Core Duo. What do you recomend I upgrade to and any idea how much it would cost me for parts?

    Thanks for your knowledge.

  • 3. Re: Can anyone answer this question?
    Shootist007 Level 6 Level 6 (16,640 points)

    Short answer is No you can't upgrade the hardware on your system. you'll have to by a newer Mac, maybe not brand new, to upgrade to the newer OS X versions, features and programs.

  • 4. Re: Can anyone answer this question?
    Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (226,765 points)

    If you have a Core Duo model - not a Core 2 Duo - then you can only upgrade the OS to 10.6.8 Snow Leopard. You have adequate RAM for Snow Leopard but it would not hurt to expand it to the maximum 2 GBs.

     

    It would help to know specifically which model you have. Open System Profiler and report what you find displayed for the Model Identifier. If the Model Identifier is 2,2 or greater then you have a Core 2 Duo which will allow you to install Lion. If you have an Identifier of 3,1 or higher, then you can install Mountain Lion. Lion and Mountain Lion will require at least 2 GBs of RAM. See below:

     

    Upgrade Paths to Snow Leopard, Lion, and/or Mountain Lion

     

    You can upgrade to Mountain Lion from Lion or directly from Snow Leopard. Mountain Lion can be downloaded from the Mac App Store for $19.99. To access the App Store you must have Snow Leopard 10.6.6 or later installed.

     

    Upgrading to Snow Leopard

     

    You must purchase Snow Leopard through the Apple Store: Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard - Apple Store (U.S.). The price is $19.99 plus tax. You will be sent physical media by mail after placing your order.

     

    After you install Snow Leopard you will have to download and install the Mac OS X 10.6.8 Update Combo v1.1 to update Snow Leopard to 10.6.8 and give you access to the App Store. Access to the App Store enables you to download Mountain Lion if your computer meets the requirements.

     

         Snow Leopard General Requirements

     

           1. Mac computer with an Intel processor

           2. 1GB of memory

           3. 5GB of available disk space

           4. DVD drive for installation

           5. Some features require a compatible Internet service provider;

               fees may apply.

           6. Some features require Apple’s iCloud services; fees and

               terms apply.

     

    Upgrading to Lion

     

    If your computer does not meet the requirements to install Mountain Lion, it may still meet the requirements to install Lion.

     

    You can purchase Lion by contacting Customer Service: Contacting Apple for support and service - this includes international calling numbers. The cost is $19.99 (as it was before) plus tax.  It's a download. You will get an email containing a redemption code that you then use at the Mac App Store to download Lion. Save a copy of that installer to your Downloads folder because the installer deletes itself at the end of the installation.

     

         Lion System Requirements

     

           1. Mac computer with an Intel Core 2 Duo, Core i3, Core i5, Core i7,

               or Xeon processor

           2. 2GB of memory

           3. OS X v10.6.6 or later (v10.6.8 recommended)

           4. 7GB of available space

           5. Some features require an Apple ID; terms apply.

     

    Upgrading to Mountain Lion

     

    To upgrade to Mountain Lion you must have Snow Leopard 10.6.8 or Lion installed. Purchase and download Mountain Lion from the App Store. Sign in using your Apple ID. Mountain Lion is $19.99 plus tax. The file is quite large, over 4 GBs, so allow some time to download. It would be preferable to use Ethernet because it is nearly four times faster than wireless.

     

         OS X Mountain Lion - System Requirements

     

           Macs that can be upgraded to OS X Mountain Lion

     

             1. iMac (Mid 2007 or newer) - Model Identifier 7,1 or later

             2. MacBook (Late 2008 Aluminum, or Early 2009 or newer) - Model Identifier 5,1 or later

             3. MacBook Pro (Mid/Late 2007 or newer) - Model Identifier 3,1 or later

             4. MacBook Air (Late 2008 or newer) - Model Identifier 2,1 or later

             5. Mac mini (Early 2009 or newer) - Model Identifier 3,1 or later

             6. Mac Pro (Early 2008 or newer) - Model Identifier 3,1 or later

             7. Xserve (Early 2009) - Model Identifier 3,1 or later

     

    To find the model identifier open System Profiler in the Utilities folder. It's displayed in the panel on the right.

     

         Are my applications compatible?

     

             See App Compatibility Table - RoaringApps.

     

         For a complete How-To introduction from Apple see Upgrade to OS X Mountain Lion.

  • 5. Re: Can anyone answer this question?
    OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (25,720 points)

    You should be able to install another 1 GB of RAM for a total of 2 GB.  Your MBP can take any 2.5 " SATA HDD that is available.  Currently the largest are 1 TB. 

     

    I suggest that you go to the OWC and Crucial websites for compatible RAM and HDDs.  Prices will be shown there.  Note that both can be user installed.  RAM will be easy, the HDD installation will require a bit of work, but it is not rocket science.  Installation videos are available on the OWC website.

     

    Ciao.

  • 6. Re: Can anyone answer this question?
    JohnTh Level 2 Level 2 (365 points)

    If you are unable to upgrade the software because of the hardware, its a clear that you just need to get yourself another machine. It doesnt make sense to upgrade that old a machine because soon nothing much will work from that anyway.

  • 7. Re: Can anyone answer this question?
    OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (25,720 points)

    JohnTh, greetings;  As Kappy indicated, the OPs MBP can be upgraded to Snow Leopard, which is still the most efficient and stable OS from Apple.  It is true that the CPU and GPU by current standards are slow, but unless the OP wants to use high end CPU intensive applications, a Core Duo will do just fine in all other areas.

     

    For less than $100 the OPs MBP can have the RAM maximized, Snow Leopard and install a 500 GB HDD.  I would consider that a good investment assuming otherwise the MBP is in good working order.

     

    Ciao.

  • 8. Re: Can anyone answer this question?
    JohnTh Level 2 Level 2 (365 points)

    Ogelthorpe, greetings to you too. I totally agree with you. My only thing is how long is one going to use the old system for? ALL of my old machines work without any problems whatsoever, but I dont, or just cant, use them for most of my day to day stuff EXCEPT for document creation (using Pages).

     

    I personally use a machine as long as I possibly can for all practical purposes. Then it gets relegated for backup and secondary usage or Photos & video storage.

  • 9. Re: Can anyone answer this question?
    OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (25,720 points)

    John Th, greetings;  Well we really are not far apart.  I have a 2.16Core Duo, my first MBP, and I purchased a 2010 2.66 i7 MBP because the older one was not powerful enough to handle high definition video properly.  For all other purposes it still serves my needs.  That may not be for others, but if you know the limitations, it still is a useful notebook.

     

    As an aside, when I originally purchased it, a 1 GB chip cost almost $150.  Now the price is less than $20.

     

    Ciao.

  • 10. Re: Can anyone answer this question?
    JohnTh Level 2 Level 2 (365 points)

    Ogelthorpe: I totally agree with you. The only thing is that the turnaround time for a machine's effective life is getting shorter and shorter by the day. I just wonder what on earth we are going to be doing with all these machines on our desk which are not broken but work and yet we have no practical day to day usage for them.

  • 11. Re: Can anyone answer this question?
    OGELTHORPE Level 7 Level 7 (25,720 points)

    John Th, greetings;  I can only speak with authority on my own perspective on this.  I view my Core Duo as being only partially obsolete.  I can still browse the Internet, participate on this forum, watch HD video and the such just as well as I can on my newer MBPs.

     

    The graphics lag on opening very large images compared with newer MBPs, but I can live with that.  Speed is nice but in my view not always essential.  If it were, I would have SSDs in my MBPs.

     

    If my top priority were creating and running weather prediction model for example, my views would naturally be different.  The Core Duo is used principally as a test vehicle (It has 10.4, 10.5 and 10.6 installed), for video viewing and occasionally as a TV.  Thus it is not quite ready for the landfill, yet.

     

    Ciao.