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Can use ipad charger to charge iphone?

498252 Views 342 Replies Latest reply: Sep 10, 2013 3:00 PM by ronhenderson2 RSS Branched to a new discussion.
  • Bass12 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Feb 8, 2013 10:32 PM (in response to gail from maine)

    Its a phenomenon that almost 100 people are reporting their iphone is charging faster with the ipads charger. What you think it is? Ipad charger fever? Well call it that.

  • modular747 Level 6 Level 6 (15,780 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 8, 2013 11:15 PM (in response to Bass12)

    It's a phenomenon that100% of people claiming that nearly 100% people are reporting that iPhones charge faster with an iPod AC adaptor (the charger is in the phone), are lying or deluded.

  • gail from maine Level 6 Level 6 (10,370 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 8, 2013 11:26 PM (in response to Bass12)

    And you explain the obverse experience how? Do you think that people who have been using Apple products for years, and have been charging their iPhones for years using iPad and iPhone chargers interchangeably with no difference are suffering from, what? Reality fever?

     

    This is a moot argument. You wish to continue to imagine that there is a difference, we continue to experience no difference. Tell you what. Don't use an iPad charger to charge your iPhone.

     

    GB

  • modular747 Level 6 Level 6 (15,780 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 8, 2013 11:30 PM (in response to gail from maine)

    Don't waste your time arguing with this troll. He's been posting that crap here for the reaction.

  • gail from maine Level 6 Level 6 (10,370 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 8, 2013 11:34 PM (in response to modular747)

    I know....a total waste of time....

     

    I'm done - it really is a pointless exercise, and there are plenty of people posting who actually need and want help....

     

    Thanks for the support, though!

     

    Cheers,

     

    GB

  • Bass12 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Feb 8, 2013 11:49 PM (in response to gail from maine)

    There are over a 100 "trolls" on this thread claiming the same, you ever think maybe their concern has some validity rather then being so abnoxious to what youve been told?  Eveyrone all of the sudden is an electronic engineer that works for Apple labs. Why not spend more time investigating why so many people are reporting and coming to this thread claiming the same rather then being a little kid!

  • crh24 Level 3 Level 3 (920 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 9, 2013 2:49 AM (in response to gail from maine)

    gail from maine wrote:

     

    <...>

    Using a different analogy for this concept - a gallon of water will take twice as long to go through a 1" tube than it will to go through a 2" tube.....

     

    Cheers,

     

    GB

    Since a large percentage of the notes in this thread are 'drifty' what's another 'drifty' response

     

    If turbulance isn't involved and pressure is a constant then the flow rate goes up with the cross sectional area, not the diameter.  As a 1" tube has an area of .785398 (PI x .5 x .5)  sq in and a 2" tube has a cross sectional area of 3.14159265359 (PI x 1 x 1) sq in then the water will flow through the 2" tube (PI x 1 x 1)/(PI x .5 x .5) = 1/.25 = 4 times as fast, not twice.

     

    This, of course, ignores friction and its effects.

     

    We now return this thread to its usual endeavor--building EE houses on a shifting sand dune...

    iPhone 5, iOS 6, iPad '4' 64GB AT&T (2), iPad 2
  • Lawrence Finch Level 7 Level 7 (24,590 points)
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    Feb 9, 2013 5:58 AM (in response to RobGutierrez)

    RobGutierrez wrote:

     

    Sorry I tried to explain it this way but I have no tech background whatsoever but this is how I understand it.

    Don't you love that about the Internet? Someone with admittedly no tech background posts utter rubbish, which then becomes "fact".

     

    And people who DO have a tech background, engineers and physicists, post correct explanations and are ridiculed. Welcome to the Third Millennium.

  • Lawrence Finch Level 7 Level 7 (24,590 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 9, 2013 6:06 AM (in response to Bass12)

    Bass12 wrote:

     

    Do you think the 100s of people coming asking why they notice their phone charging much faster or why their battery is draining faster after using the ipad charger, is in their head? Dont you think maybe just maybe after the 100s person searching for this that maybe what they are reporting is of some significance and not be so arrogant.

    People find this thread and fall victim to the arrogant stuborn folks as yourself after google provides them this thread as top choice.

     

    From my experience and is how I found this thread after a google search and why more keep falling victim to this pathetic thread and to all people noticing strange behaviors using their ipad charger.

     

    Yes the ipad charger charges the iphone much faster then the iphone charger.

    Yes you will notice the battery dranining much faster after using the ipad charger.

     

    It is not your imagination and disregard these clowns here telling you its your imagination.

     

    Totally wrong. First, I do not see 100s of people claiming that the phone charges faster or gets hotter. I see a few trolls who post the same thing over and over.

     

    I DO see Apple's product page that says the iPad charger is compatible with the iPhone.

     

    I also see posts from people who have made actual MEASUREMENTS and found that the iPhone does not get hotter and does not charge faster (as opposed to subjective "it felt hotter") on an iPad charger. I am one who actually measured charging time and temperature using a laser temperature probe. The iPad charger does not charge and iPhone any faster and the phone does not get hotter with an iPad charger. But the most convincincing measurement was done by measuring the power supplied to the iPhone by a 12 watt iPad charger, which turned out to be MEASURED as 5 watts. You can see it here:

     

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DC4gPxc89Wg

  • Lawrence Finch Level 7 Level 7 (24,590 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 9, 2013 6:09 AM (in response to crh24)

    crh24 wrote:

     

    gail from maine wrote:

     

    <...>

    Using a different analogy for this concept - a gallon of water will take twice as long to go through a 1" tube than it will to go through a 2" tube.....

     

    Cheers,

     

    GB

    Since a large percentage of the notes in this thread are 'drifty' what's another 'drifty' response

     

    If turbulance isn't involved and pressure is a constant then the flow rate goes up with the cross sectional area, not the diameter.  As a 1" tube has an area of .785398 (PI x .5 x .5)  sq in and a 2" tube has a cross sectional area of 3.14159265359 (PI x 1 x 1) sq in then the water will flow through the 2" tube (PI x 1 x 1)/(PI x .5 x .5) = 1/.25 = 4 times as fast, not twice.

     

    This, of course, ignores friction and its effects.

     

    We now return this thread to its usual endeavor--building EE houses on a shifting sand dune...

    Thanks for brightening my day

  • bb340 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 9, 2013 9:48 AM (in response to Lawrence Finch)

    Starting a couple of months ago I charged a completly discharged iPhone 5 with the iPhone power supply and recorded the results. First it took a few minutes to get a display showing time and battery percentage. Then I noted both numbers every 2 or 3 minutes for awhile and at least every 5 or 10 minutes until it a battery App showed it was no longer charging.   Then a week or so later when the phone was again dead and I had some time I charged it with the iPad supply and again recorded the time and percentage every few minutes. After that I did the same thing on a trip using a Griffin USB adapter in the car cigarette lighter. Then tried it with s Belkin device that plugs into a 110 wall receptacle and gives you 6 standard 110 plugs, and 2 USB outlets. The results were all the same, so I quit worrying about what power supply I used. Try it yourself. The charger in the phone does its job.   All three showed the same 3 tier rate called "fast", "trickle", and "top off" by my app.  Drifty PS.  Fluid Mechanics? Old Osbourne Reynolds would be amazed that his work was getting mentioned in this thread. Good call LF.

  • Firenzo Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 10, 2013 3:25 AM (in response to emfung)

    After reading this long thread and watching the video. I understand that the iPhone will only get what it needs in charging, well that is in normal charging scenarios (leaving it to charge without using it) so any adapter with higher watt (lets say i have a 20w adapter) it will get only 5w.

     

    What if i am using my iPhone while charging does it draw more electricity while using it?

     

    Well, i had a new 20w which is not apple made, and while charging my iPhone without using it, its just the same results as to charging time and temperature as the one supplied by apple,

     

    however the first time i tried using it while charging (using the 20w) i noticed that its hotter than usual, i even feel the heat on the sides with the bumper on which i do not get on using apple supplied adpater 5w. I am currently not using my iPhone while charging because it might cause some problems.. Does this mean its getting more electricity since the adapter have higher watts?

     

    Thanks

  • iinami Level 4 Level 4 (1,400 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 10, 2013 4:41 AM (in response to emfung)

    okay, here i go: the iphone 5 comes with a 5w plug. all the car chargers i see that come with the lightning connector hardwired into the piece that plugs into the car are 10w. on apple's website and in their store, which i was at yesterday, the only 'hardwired' car chargers they sell are the 10w kind. i do see that you can buy a 5w usb connector where you use your own original cord and plug it into the piece that plugs into your car. what i'm wondering is, would my phone be better off buying the 5w plug? why don't these companies make a 5w 'hardwired' iphone 5 charger? would apple really sell a 'hardwired' 10w car charger and say it's compatible with the iphone 5 if it wasn't? is anyone here using the 10w car charger on their iphone 5, and have you noticed anything different since using it? my old iphone 4 was pristine when i got rid of it and i'd like my iphone 5 to be that way too.

  • gail from maine Level 6 Level 6 (10,370 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 10, 2013 7:56 PM (in response to iinami)

    No. Uneeded. No. Yes. No.

     

    GB

  • DACCG Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 12, 2013 11:24 AM (in response to Firenzo)

    Probably the reason why it gets hotter is because you're using it, it seems non relevant, but makes a lot of difference. And now, speaking of electronics, it might get hotter because it's getting more electricity than with the 5w adapter because this one only 'serves' 1A, whereas the 10w and 12w adapters 'serve' 2.1A and 2.4. This doesn't mean that the iPhone will take 2.1A or 2.4A but those extra Amps mean that the iPhone will always be getting 1A, even when using the phone. In the other hand, with the 5w adapter, the battery will get 1A minus the 'charge' needed for supporting the usage of the phone.

     

    Hope that helps!

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