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"Other" data (iPhone) - How do I remove this junk?

1188410 Views 1,155 Replies Latest reply: Apr 11, 2014 8:07 PM by Mr. Luigi RSS Branched to a new discussion.
  • Lawrence Finch Level 7 Level 7 (24,555 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 11, 2013 7:37 AM (in response to pdroth)

    For every complex problem there is a simple solution. And it's wrong.

     

    I have never used MMS in my life. So what is the explanation for my large Other?

  • Edg-R Calculating status...

    It actually wasn't that simple. It was just very recently that we figured out that it was due to the MMS attachments.

     

    You've never sent an MMS? No photos sent to anybody? No videos? Might be orphaned data from old applications.

  • ShOzzz Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 11, 2013 7:51 AM (in response to Edg-R)

    It's a lot more then just mms

     

    It's ghost files from apps after being deleted as well as ghost files from a cleared camera roll.

     

    It's ******** is what it is!!!

  • pdroth Level 5 Level 5 (4,815 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 11, 2013 7:52 AM (in response to Edg-R)

    I should have stated the problem with my device is MMS attachments.    I used iExplorer and found nearly 2GB worth of old pics/videos in /library/sms/attachment folder which is the bulk of my "Other".    Upon opening some of those attachments I discovered they are pics deleted long ago from conversations that are now erased as well.   So in my case, they are orphaned.

  • Lawrence Finch Level 7 Level 7 (24,555 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 11, 2013 7:54 AM (in response to Edg-R)

    Edg-R wrote:

     

    It actually wasn't that simple. It was just very recently that we figured out that it was due to the MMS attachments.

     

    You've never sent an MMS? No photos sent to anybody? No videos? Might be orphaned data from old applications.

     

    It could be lots of things. The point I was making is that it is not JUST mms attachments. It would be nice if life were that easy.

  • DeltaSky08 Calculating status...

    Yes 6.1 should addresses the issue of increase "Other Data" to prevent growing but it should include the removal it without the need of hard reset. Apple is going downstream with this release and the previous.

  • Tigervision Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I have been following this thread and I have a question about restore.  If I should post elsewhere, let me know.

     

    My iphone5 is backed up to icloud. I also when I sync to itunes occasionally right click on it and back up to my computer.

     

    So what the heck is the difference between these back ups?? 

    If I restore my phone to factory new, which would I use to restore my phone?  itunes or icloud backups?

    (I know this won't solve the other issue and my other will return to be the same).

     

    But still... how does one restore from icloud?  And what is the difference between the two backups?  Which sould I use?

     

    Thanks.

  • Edg-R Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    They're the same kind of backup. Theoretically, you should only use one. There's no use in creating a local backup if you already have iCloud backup turned on. Which one would you choose if you needed to restore? The most recent I suppose.

     

     

    In order to use a backup from iCloud, simply go to Settings > General > Reset > Erase All Content and Settings.
    Once it goes through the process of configuring the iPhone for first use, it'll ask if you'd like to set up the phone as new or restore from backup. If you choose from iCloud backup, it'll ask for your credentials and then download the backup (wifi required, of course).

     

    Wich one should you use? It depends, if you hardly ever connect your phone to iTunes then iCloud would be best.

  • gail from maine Level 6 Level 6 (10,180 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 11, 2013 9:04 PM (in response to Edg-R)

    Hi Edg-R,

     

    Not true. iCloud backup is not = a full backup of your phone on this computer, as it does not include a backup of Music, Movies, and TV shows not purchased from the iTunes store, Podcasts and Audiobooks, or photos that were originally synced to your phone from the computer (i.e., ones that were imported from a camera or another i-device under a different AppleID).

     

    A backup on your computer is a full backup....

     

    Cheers,

     

    GB

  • everkleer Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 11, 2013 9:07 PM (in response to Edg-R)

    I would not say "there's no use" in using both.  They are functionally the same, but it's not a bad idea to have more than one backup.  It's not completely necessary and your probably fine with just one, but if you have both then you have a plan B if one of the backups fails or is lost.  I have heard stories of people who tryed to restore using their iCloud backup and it failed saying the data had not all been backed up - and he said he had never seen any warnings before that his backups had failed.  I'm not saying that's likely to happen to you if you use iCloud backup, or that it's a common occurance, I'm just saying that it's always possible that something might happen, and two backups is better than one.

     

    I use iCloud backup so my phone automatically backs up when I plug it in to charge it every night, and then once every few weeks (or whenever I think of it) I do a manual backup through iTunes.  If I have to restore, I use the most current backup (usually iCloud) and if that fails (though it never has) then I'd try my other(s).

  • Edg-R Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Gail,

     

    iTunes backups don't include music, videos etc either.

    I have roughly 40gb of music and about 60gb of movies. While they're not all synced to my device, even the ones that are synced don't get backed up to a backup, and for good reason. What would be the point? The music is already on your computer, once you restore your device, all you have to do I'd sync your music your from library.

  • Lawrence Finch Level 7 Level 7 (24,555 points)

    Tigervision wrote:

     

    I have been following this thread and I have a question about restore.  If I should post elsewhere, let me know.

     

    My iphone5 is backed up to icloud. I also when I sync to itunes occasionally right click on it and back up to my computer.

     

    So what the heck is the difference between these back ups?? 

    If I restore my phone to factory new, which would I use to restore my phone?  itunes or icloud backups?

    (I know this won't solve the other issue and my other will return to be the same).

     

    But still... how does one restore from icloud?  And what is the difference between the two backups?  Which sould I use?

     

    Thanks.

    For a discussion of the two types of backups see:

    Choosing an iOS backup method (Should I use iTunes or iCloud to back up my iOS device?)

     

    The best answer is "both".

  • gail from maine Level 6 Level 6 (10,180 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 12, 2013 7:37 AM (in response to Edg-R)

    Hi Edg-R,

     

    You are correct. I did cite the incorrect components that differ iTunes from iCloud backup. Here is the comparative list:

     

    iCloud:

     

    You get unlimited free storage for:

    • Purchased music, movies, TV shows, apps, and books
    • Notes: Backup of purchased music is not available in all countries. Backups of purchased movies and TV shows are U.S. only. Previous purchases may not be restored if they are no longer in the iTunes Store, App Store, or iBookstore.

      Some previously purchased movies may not be available in iTunes in the Cloud. These movies will indicate that they are not available in iTunes in the Cloud on their product details page in the iTunes Store. Previous purchases may be unavailable if they have been refunded or are no longer available in the iTunes Store, App Store, or iBookstore.

    You get 5 GB of free iCloud storage for:

    • Photos and videos in the Camera Roll
    • Device settings (for example: Phone Favorites, Wallpaper, and Mail, Contacts, Calendar accounts)
    • App data
    • Home screen and app organization
    • Messages (iMessage, SMS, and MMS)
    • Ringtones
    • Visual Voicemails

     

    iTunes:

     

    • Contacts* and Contact Favorites (regularly sync contacts to a computer or cloud service such as iCloud to back them up).
    • App Store Application data including in-app purchases (except the Application itself, its tmp and Caches folder).
    • Application settings, preferences, and data, including documents.
    • Autofill for webpages.
    • CalDAV and subscribed calendar accounts.
    • Calendar accounts.
    • Calendar events.
    • Call history.
    • Camera Roll (Photos, screenshots, images saved, and videos taken. Videos greater than 2 GB are backed up with iOS 4.0 and later.)
      Note:  For devices without a camera, Camera Roll is called Saved Photos.
    • Game Center account.
    • Home screen arrangement.
    • In-app purchases.
    • Keychain (this includes email account passwords, Wi-Fi passwords, and passwords you enter into websites and some other applications. If you encrypt the backup with iOS 4 and later, you can transfer the keychain information  to the new device. With an unencrypted backup, you can  restore the keychain  only to the same iOS device. If you are restoring to a new device with an unencrypted backup, you will need to enter these passwords again.)
    • List of External Sync Sources (MobileMe, Exchange ActiveSync).
    • Location service preferences for apps and websites you have allowed to use your location.
    • Mail accounts (mail messages are not backed up).
    • Installed Profiles. When restoring a backup to a different device, installed configuration profiles are not restored (such as accounts, restrictions, or anything which can be specified through an installed profile.) Any accounts or settings that are not associated with an installed profile will still be restored.
    • Map bookmarks, recent searches, and the current location displayed in Maps.
    • Microsoft Exchange account configurations.
    • Network settings (saved Wi-Fi hotspots, VPN settings, network preferences).
    • Nike + iPod saved workouts and settings.
    • Notes.
    • Offline web application cache/database.
    • Paired Bluetooth devices (which can only be used if restored to the same phone that did the backup).
    • Safari bookmarks, cookies, history, offline data, and currently open pages.
    • Saved suggestion corrections (these are saved automatically as you reject suggested corrections).
    • Messages (iMessage and carrier SMS or MMS pictures and videos).
    • Trusted hosts that have certificates that cannot be verified.
    • Voice memos.
    • Voicemail token. (This is not the voicemail password, but is used for validation when connecting. This is only restored to a phone with the same phone number on the SIM card).
    • Wallpapers.
    • Web clips.
    • YouTube bookmarks and history.

     

    So there you have it. Not the same, and as Lawerence has indicated - best to have both....

     

    GB

  • tmkup1987 Calculating status...

    I can confirm, though I'm frustrated that this is the case, that "voiding your warranty" will, in fact, get rid of the Other category if its MMS related.

     

    A backup after deleting the orphaned attachments (some of which were MMSs that had been deleted off my devices since 2011!!!!) then a full restore to that backup while "restoring your warranty" will get rid of the Other.

     

    At least, in my case on an iPhone 4S and iPad 3rd Generation. iPhone went from over 2.3 gigs of Other down to 500 MB; iPad went from 3.4 Other down to 1.3. Both had approximately 2GB freed up from deleting the MMS attachments folder.

     

    This process also reallocated some of the Other to Apps, although I stand by my original assertion that deleting the apps does nothing to erase the Other. While Lawrence is right in that some of the Other *is* App data, its like there is a bug in how iOS recognizes some App data and deleting the apps does nothing for your Other -- it still classifies the space as used when the parent App is deleted. This process made iOS realize "oh yeah, some of that should be called Apps" -- so when I delete the Apps I should regain my space. It was a minor change though, but enough to notice.

     

    This is the important part:

    I should not have to void my warranty to empty my iOS device's trashcan. 6.1 may stop additional attachments from being orphaned, but what will Apple do so that users don't have to resort to the steps I did to get rid of the junk that should have been gone a long time ago?

  • wisniak Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 14, 2013 2:58 PM (in response to tmkup1987)

    Well,

    Just wanted to affirm what is already known: restoring the iPhone as new does not remove the Other.

    Actually, a large portion of the Other is created while restoring AS NEW.

    I had prior experience of this but now that 6.1.1 came out I tried again anyway.

    So after installing all my apps etc - I had almost 700mb of Other...

    I don't use iCloud and did not restore ANYTHING from backup.

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