7 Replies Latest reply: Feb 24, 2013 11:35 AM by SiriLinn
SiriLinn Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

And how do I do it? Does it pay off (old macbook pro, maybe 5 years old)?

I use MacKeeper, but it is still very slow. Maybe I should admit to myself that it is to old, and retire it?

 

Please help me!

 

/ SL


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.5.8)
  • 1. Re: Can I easily update my OS X 10.5.8 to the newest without loosing data?
    Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (226,775 points)

    I would not take the chance. Make a backup before you upgrade. Get rid of MacKeeper - How to Remove MacKeeper. Repair your hard drive and permissions:

     

    Repair the Hard Drive and Permissions

     

    Boot from your Leopard Installer disc. After the installer loads select your language and click on the Continue button. When the menu bar appears select Disk Utility from the Utilities menu. After DU loads select your hard drive entry (mfgr.'s ID and drive size) from the the left side list.  In the DU status area you will see an entry for the S.M.A.R.T. status of the hard drive.  If it does not say "Verified" then the hard drive is failing or failed. (SMART status is not reported on external Firewire or USB drives.) If the drive is "Verified" then select your OS X volume from the list on the left (sub-entry below the drive entry,) click on the First Aid tab, then click on the Repair Disk button. If DU reports any errors that have been fixed, then re-run Repair Disk until no errors are reported. If no errors are reported click on the Repair Permissions button. Wait until the operation completes, then quit DU and return to the installer.

     

    If DU reports errors it cannot fix, then you will need Disk Warrior and/or Tech Tool Pro to repair the drive. If you don't have either of them or if neither of them can fix the drive, then you will need to reformat the drive and reinstall OS X.


    The following outlines your potential upgrade path:

     

    Upgrade Paths to Snow Leopard, Lion, and/or Mountain Lion

     

    You can upgrade to Mountain Lion from Lion or directly from Snow Leopard. Mountain Lion can be downloaded from the Mac App Store for $19.99. To access the App Store you must have Snow Leopard 10.6.6 or later installed.

     

    Upgrading to Snow Leopard

     

    You can purchase Snow Leopard through the Apple Store: Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard - Apple Store (U.S.). The price is $19.99 plus tax. You will be sent physical media by mail after placing your order.

     

    After you install Snow Leopard you will have to download and install the Mac OS X 10.6.8 Update Combo v1.1 to update Snow Leopard to 10.6.8 and give you access to the App Store. Access to the App Store enables you to download Mountain Lion if your computer meets the requirements.

     

         Snow Leopard General Requirements

     

           1. Mac computer with an Intel processor

           2. 1GB of memory

           3. 5GB of available disk space

           4. DVD drive for installation

           5. Some features require a compatible Internet service provider;

               fees may apply.

           6. Some features require Apple’s iCloud services; fees and

               terms apply.

     

    Upgrading to Lion

     

    If your computer does not meet the requirements to install Mountain Lion, it may still meet the requirements to install Lion.

     

    You can purchase Lion by contacting Customer Service: Contacting Apple for support and service - this includes international calling numbers. The cost is $19.99 (as it was before) plus tax.  It's a download. You will get an email containing a redemption code that you then use at the Mac App Store to download Lion. Save a copy of that installer to your Downloads folder because the installer deletes itself at the end of the installation.

     

         Lion System Requirements

     

           1. Mac computer with an Intel Core 2 Duo, Core i3, Core i5, Core i7,

               or Xeon processor

           2. 2GB of memory

           3. OS X v10.6.6 or later (v10.6.8 recommended)

           4. 7GB of available space

           5. Some features require an Apple ID; terms apply.

     

    Upgrading to Mountain Lion

     

    To upgrade to Mountain Lion you must have Snow Leopard 10.6.8 or Lion installed. Purchase and download Mountain Lion from the App Store. Sign in using your Apple ID. Mountain Lion is $19.99 plus tax. The file is quite large, over 4 GBs, so allow some time to download. It would be preferable to use Ethernet because it is nearly four times faster than wireless.

     

         OS X Mountain Lion - System Requirements

     

           Macs that can be upgraded to OS X Mountain Lion

     

             1. iMac (Mid 2007 or newer) - Model Identifier 7,1 or later

             2. MacBook (Late 2008 Aluminum, or Early 2009 or newer) - Model Identifier 5,1 or later

             3. MacBook Pro (Mid/Late 2007 or newer) - Model Identifier 3,1 or later

             4. MacBook Air (Late 2008 or newer) - Model Identifier 2,1 or later

             5. Mac mini (Early 2009 or newer) - Model Identifier 3,1 or later

             6. Mac Pro (Early 2008 or newer) - Model Identifier 3,1 or later

             7. Xserve (Early 2009) - Model Identifier 3,1 or later

     

    To find the model identifier open System Profiler in the Utilities folder. It's displayed in the panel on the right.

     

         Are my applications compatible?

     

             See App Compatibility Table - RoaringApps.

     

         For a complete How-To introduction from Apple see Upgrade to OS X Mountain Lion.

  • 2. Re: Can I easily update my OS X 10.5.8 to the newest without loosing data?
    SiriLinn Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks

     

    This will then cost me aprox 50 USD I assume... That is not bad.

    Will it get up to speed? It has only 2GB RAM and 1,07 GHz bus speed with a Core duo processor..

     

    In my ears it sounds a bit like a lost cause...

     

    Thanks again!

  • 3. Re: Can I easily update my OS X 10.5.8 to the newest without loosing data?
    Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (226,775 points)

    Well, if you truly have a Core Duo rather than a Core2Duo, then you can only upgrade to Snow Leopard. But upgrading isn't going to make the computer faster. If it's your desire to upgrade as much as possible then you have to buy a newer computer.

     

    Meanwhile, you might get improved performance by reading through the following:

     

    Things You Can Do To Resolve Slow Downs

     

    If your computer seems to be running slower here are some things you can do:

     

    Start with a visit to: OS X Maintenance - MacAttorney.

     

    Boot into Safe Mode then repair your hard drive and permissions:

     

    Repair the Hard Drive and Permissions Pre-Lion

     

    Boot from your OS X Installer disc. After the installer loads select your language and click on the Continue button. When the menu bar appears select Disk Utility from the Utilities menu. After DU loads select your hard drive entry (mfgr.'s ID and drive size) from the the left side list.  In the DU status area you will see an entry for the S.M.A.R.T. status of the hard drive.  If it does not say "Verified" then the hard drive is failing or failed. (SMART status is not reported on external Firewire or USB drives.) If the drive is "Verified" then select your OS X volume from the list on the left (sub-entry below the drive entry,) click on the First Aid tab, then click on the Repair Disk button. If DU reports any errors that have been fixed, then re-run Repair Disk until no errors are reported. If no errors are reported click on the Repair Permissions button. Wait until the operation completes, then quit DU and return to the installer.

     

    If DU reports errors it cannot fix, then you will need Disk Warrior and/or Tech Tool Pro to repair the drive. If you don't have either of them or if neither of them can fix the drive, then you will need to reformat the drive and reinstall OS X.

     

    Repair the Hard Drive - Lion

     

    Boot from your Lion Recovery HD. When the recovery menu appears select Disk Utility. After DU loads select your hard drive entry (mfgr.'s ID and drive size) from the the left side list.  In the DU status area you will see an entry for the S.M.A.R.T. status of the hard drive.  If it does not say "Verified" then the hard drive is failing or failed. (SMART status is not reported on external Firewire or USB drives.) If the drive is "Verified" then select your OS X volume from the list on the left (sub-entry below the drive entry,) click on the First Aid tab, then click on the Repair Disk button. If DU reports any errors that have been fixed, then re-run Repair Disk until no errors are reported. If no errors are reported, then click on the Repair Permissions button. Wait until the operation completes, then quit DU and return to the main menu. Select Restart from the Apple menu.

     

    Boot to the Recovery HD:

     

    Restart the computer and after the chime press and hold down the COMMAND and R keys until the menu screen appears. Alternatively, restart the computer and after the chime press and hold down the OPTION key until the boot manager screen appears. Select the Recovery HD and click on the downward pointing arrow button.

     

    Restart your computer normally and see if this has helped any. Next do some maintenance:

     

    Suggestions for OS X Maintenance

     

    For situations Disk Utility cannot handle the best third-party utility is Disk Warrior;  DW only fixes problems with the disk directory, but most disk problems are caused by directory corruption; Disk Warrior 4.x is now Intel Mac compatible.

     

    OS X performs certain maintenance functions that are scheduled to occur on a daily, weekly, or monthly period. The maintenance scripts run in the early AM only if the computer is turned on 24/7 (no sleep.) If this isn't the case, then an excellent solution is to download and install a shareware utility such as Macaroni, JAW PseudoAnacron, or Anacron that will automate the maintenance activity regardless of whether the computer is turned off or asleep.  Dependence upon third-party utilities to run the periodic maintenance scripts was significantly reduced since Tiger.  These utilities have limited or no functionality with Snow Leopard or Lion and should not be installed.

     

    OS X automatically defragments files less than 20 MBs in size, so unless you have a disk full of very large files there's little need for defragmenting the hard drive. As for virus protection there are few if any such animals affecting OS X. You can protect the computer easily using the freeware Open Source virus protection software ClamXAV. Personally I would avoid most commercial anti-virus software because of their potential for causing problems. For more about malware see Macintosh Virus Guide.

     

    I would also recommend downloading a utility such as TinkerTool System, OnyX 2.4.3, or Cocktail 5.1.1 that you can use for periodic maintenance such as removing old log files and archives, clearing caches, etc.

     

    For emergency repairs install the freeware utility Applejack.  If you cannot start up in OS X, you may be able to start in single-user mode from which you can run Applejack to do a whole set of repair and maintenance routines from the command line.  Note that AppleJack 1.5 is required for Leopard. AppleJack 1.6 is compatible with Snow Leopard. There is no confirmation that this version also works with Lion.

     

    When you install any new system software or updates be sure to repair the hard drive and permissions beforehand.

     

    Get an external Firewire drive at least equal in size to the internal hard drive and make (and maintain) a bootable clone/backup. You can make a bootable clone using the Restore option of Disk Utility. You can also make and maintain clones with good backup software. My personal recommendations are (order is not significant):

     

      1. Carbon Copy Cloner

      2. Data Backup

      3. Deja Vu

      4. SuperDuper!

      5. SyncTwoFolders

      6. Synk Pro

      7. Synk Standard

      8. Tri-Backup

     

    Visit The XLab FAQs and read the FAQs on maintenance, optimization, virus protection, and backup and restore.

     

    Additional suggestions will be found in Mac maintenance Quick Assist.

     

    Referenced software can be found at CNet Downloads or MacUpdate.

     

    Additional Hints

     

    Be sure you have an adequate amount of RAM installed for the number of applications you run concurrently. Be sure you leave a minimum of 10% of the hard drive's capacity as free space.

     

    Add more RAM. If your computer has less than 2 GBs of RAM and you are using OS X Leopard or later, then you can do with more RAM. Snow Leopard and Lion work much better with 4 GBs of RAM than their system minimums. The more concurrent applications you tend to use the more RAM you should have.

     

    Always maintain at least 15 GBs or 10% of your hard drive's capacity as free space, whichever is greater. OS X is frequently accessing your hard drive, so providing adequate free space will keep things from slowing down.

     

    Check for applications that may be hogging the CPU:

     

    Open Activity Monitor in the Utilities folder.  Select All Processes from the Processes dropdown menu.  Click twice on the CPU% column header to display in descending order.  If you find a process using a large amount of CPU time, then select the process and click on the Quit icon in the toolbar.  Click on the Force Quit button to kill the process.  See if that helps.  Be sure to note the name of the runaway process so you can track down the cause of the problem.

     

    Often this problem occurs because of a corrupted cache or preferences file or an attempt to write to a corrupted log file.

  • 4. Re: Can I easily update my OS X 10.5.8 to the newest without loosing data?
    BobHarris Level 6 Level 6 (13,120 points)

    In my ears it sounds a bit like a lost cause...

     

    Personally, I would either consider staying where you are, or start budgeting for a new system, and maybe turning this system into a home server with some external disks, then run CrashPlan on it and your replacment Mac for regular backups.

     

    It can also be a music server for your home, and other storage needs.  Just remember not to have just one copy of anything if you use this for a music, media. archival storage device.

  • 5. Re: Can I easily update my OS X 10.5.8 to the newest without loosing data?
    SiriLinn Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    It is what I thought

     

    It is a Core 2 duo (at first I thought they where the same - stupid me), and my biggest problem is that the fash player totally stopped working last week.

    I can not find any little trick to get it working.

     

    For me it is no Internet-TV, internet-bank (Crisis!!) or youtube...

     

    Q is: Upgrading this or getting a new?

    I don't want to use money to upgrade this if the new OS will make it slower (it is slow enough as it is).

  • 6. Re: Can I easily update my OS X 10.5.8 to the newest without loosing data?
    Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (226,775 points)

    It isn't going to make it slower (or at least not noticeably slower.) But if updating the hardware is an option to consider, then spend the money on getting a new computer.

  • 7. Re: Can I easily update my OS X 10.5.8 to the newest without loosing data?
    SiriLinn Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks for the advice, both of you Have a nice day!