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Should I Uninstall Aperture and iPhoto? warning-long and complicated!

1990 Views 39 Replies Latest reply: Mar 17, 2013 12:44 PM by 1macprincess! RSS
  • CorkyO2 Level 4 Level 4 (1,290 points)

    No problem, 1macprincess!

     

    It sounds like you are in good shape. Have fun!

  • CorkyO2 Level 4 Level 4 (1,290 points)

    1macprincess! wrote:

     

    Thanks....question though. not all the images could be found. i proceeded to consolidate what Aperture could. Is this where i stop, backup, then transfer to my mbp?

    Once you have the library consolidated to your liking, simply copy the library to a backup drive (for backup) and / or to the MBP (where you can simply double-click to load and set as the default library).

     

    Note - for images that could not be found (if this refers to missing or offline originals) you could try selecting those image thumbnails in the browser and then using the 'File > Locate Referenced Files' command to reconnect them. This would allow you to consolidate those into the library as well.

     

    If at all possible, I would suggest having a final library that has no missing originals listed so you can feel confident in copying the now managed library anywhere.

  • CorkyO2 Level 4 Level 4 (1,290 points)

     

    1macprincess! wrote

     

     

    ok, did the above, but any option to reconnect is grayed out. all the files are listed in red in the search box results. any thoughts on what to do next?

     

    Follow the instructions under "Reconnecting Missing or Offline Referenced Images" at about mid-page at link below:

     

    http://documentation.apple.com/en/aperture/usermanual/index.html#chapter=5%26sec tion=16%26tasks=true

     

    Note - you will need to have the originals either copied to your internal drive or an EHD connected that contains the originals. It may be a bit of a process depending on whether they are located in the same folder or in various folders / locations.

     

    If you don't have the originals anymore, then depending on how important they are, you could delete them from the Aperture library (which are basically aliases - or shortcuts - to the original). Totally up to you obviously, but the idea is again to have a fully consolidated library without any missing or offline images so you can copy / backup the library which will contain all data needed for working on the images.

  • CorkyO2 Level 4 Level 4 (1,290 points)

    1macprincess!,

     

    No problem with the questions (the only dumb question is the one you don't ask). I don't burn out, just hope to help.

     

    I don't know the history of your use of both iPhoto and Aperture, nor your original issue beyond trying to combine two Aperture libraries and things going sideways. Once Apple allowed both iPhoto and Aperture to use the same library, they opened a whole new can of worms for any technical assistance (since Aperture can work with iPhoto originals as 'referenced' masters, this can make the process of reconnecting an issue if the originals are inside the iPhoto library).

     

    If I were you and the 1955 images are the ones you can't reconnect, I would do one of the following:

     

    1 - Consolidate the Aperture library as best you can and work with that one knowing that I would have a number of images that are listed as offline or missing.

     

    Note - the problem with this path is that you can only view those missing image thumbnails (and previews if they exist) in Aperture. No adjustments, relocating or exporting of those specific images is possible due to the way Aperture works as 'Non-Destructive'.

     

    2 - Copy the current Aperture library (which is partially consolidated) to an external hard drive and then delete any images showing in Aperture as being offline or missing. Once the library is copied to the external hard drive (and perhaps renamed 'Original Aperture Library') - working in the current Aperture library (not the one you just copied to the external hard drive), you could delete the missing images showing in the library and go forward with the managed library scenario.

     

    Personally, I would opt for number 2 and then work toward finding a way to reconnect the original referenced images in the future. This would allow me to work with a managed library moving forward and allow for the possibility of consolidating the 1955 images later.

     

    FWIW, Aperture was originally designed with a 'Managed' library because the original designers were concerned with keeping all library assets (images, adjustments, metadata, etc.) together all the time. Users started to request the ability to use 'Referenced' images due to storage space issues and Apple accomodated that request. Unfortunately, this has side effects that aren't alway great.

     

    For users like you and me, I suggest the 'Managed' library approach since it is simpler and we can always make multiple libraries to work around internal storage space constraints (e.g., an Aperture library each year, or one each for Family, Friends, Facebook, etc.). This is really not much different to having folders of the same type. I am a huge fan of simplicity and I find the maintenance of a referenced library system to be more work than I need to put in as a simple enthusiast of taking pictures for memories. I do however understand the professional (or serious photographer) side of needing very large amounts of image file storage.

     

    Final note - I always export my final images as JPEG for long term storage. I do this because I won't need to go back and rework any files and I feel confident in the JPEG file format being compatible with just about any platform.

     

    Message was edited by: CorkyO2 for typo's

  • CorkyO2 Level 4 Level 4 (1,290 points)

    CorkyO2 wrote:

     

     

    2 - Copy the current Aperture library (which is partially consolidated) to an external hard drive and then delete any images showing in Aperture as being offline or missing. Once the library is copied to the external hard drive (and perhaps renamed 'Original Aperture Library') - working in the current Aperture library (not the one you just copied to the external hard drive), you could delete the missing images showing in the library and go forward with the managed library scenario.

    I couldn't get back in to edit this paragraph, so will simplify in this comment:

     

    2 - Copy the current Aperture library (which is partially consolidated) to an external hard drive and then delete any images showing in Aperture as being offline or missing. Once the library is copied to the external hard drive (and perhaps renamed 'Original Aperture Library') - working in the current Aperture library (not the one you just copied to the external hard drive), you could delete the missing images showing in the library and go forward with the managed library scenario.

     

     

    The redundant statement wasn't very simple. The end result would be one backup of the library intact which has all references to images (including any references to missing / offline images) as well as one working library that has any references to missing / offline images deleted. This working library would be self-contained and easily moved / copied without issue.

     

    I know both Kirby and Léonie (as well as some others here) have more knowledge about working through reconnecting referenced masters in complex situations, so hopefully they will drop by and offer some better advice if mine doesn't suffice.

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,355 points)

    You are doing just fine, Corky; and as our princess rightfully mentioned the too many cooks in the kitchen I'll refrain from from adding my grain of salt

  • CorkyO2 Level 4 Level 4 (1,290 points)

    To whomever might know the answer to this: If I am editing in Photoshop or PSE, would i be able to work with referenced images. I am pretty sure the 1955 images were either initially in iPhoto, or from other peoples memory cards and imported into iPhoto, or Aperture.

    The easy answer is yes, you can edit referenced images in either Photoshop (full version) or PSE.

     

    The longer answer is that you would handle editing in either Photoshop or PSE differently if used in conjunction with Aperture. The standard designed method is to use the Aperture preferences pane and go to the 'Export' section. Using the External Editor area you would select either Photoshop.app or PSE.app as the default external editor. You would then use the menu commands, or the easy method of Control-Click (Right-Click) on the image you want to edit and select the context menu command 'Edit in Photoshop'.

     

    Aperture then creates a new master file (TIFF by default, or PSD if you select that file type in the preferences) and sends it to Photoshop or PSE (which launches and opens the image sent by Aperture). You would then make your edits and use the 'Save' (not 'Save As') command in Photoshop or PSE to save the changes back to the file in Aperture.

     

    The problem you will run into in this method is that Aperture uses the export function to send to Photoshop or PSE. Without access to the original file (either referenced or managed), Aperture will certainly fail to export and probably won't even create a new TIFF or PSD file to send in the first place.

     

    You really need to locate those original files before working with them either directly in Photoshop or PSE, or from within Aperture.

     

    Aperture for all intents and purposes is a database system that can manage, add adjustments and export image file types. Whether you run a referenced or managed library, you have to first import original images into the Aperture library (database). Referenced leaves the originals where they are outside the library and managed copies the originals into the library. Aperture needs access to those originals to do any adjustment or export operation on them.

     

     

    Also- is the ability to edit/export the main purpose of a fully managed library, or ?

     

    The main purpose of a fully managed library is to have all the original images as well as any organization, adjustments, books, slideshows, albums, etc. in one package that can be copied for backup or moving purposes.

     

    With a referenced library, you will need to maintain discipline in folder organization as well as a backup routine independent of the library backup. In this scenario, you typically have folders of images on the hard drive and an Aperture library that contains everything else (adjustments, books, slideshows, etc.).

     

    Note - if you have other libraries that contain the missing originals, you could export the originals to folders and then decide on a course of action.

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,355 points)

    I have a feeling i am not going to be able to reconnect the 1955 referenced images.

    To be able to reconnect them, you need to find the original image files or copies of them. If there is really no hope of finding the originals, I'd export the versions you still have by dragging them from the Browser to a folder on your Desktop. This will create jpeg files of them. Then delete them from the library and reimport the versions from your Desktop. This way you will have new versions with low resolution originals - not as good as reconnecting to the originals, but your 1955 images can be part of your Aperture library without causing problems.

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