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Transfer ultraviolet digital copy dvd to iTunes, not Flixster?

477550 Views 425 Replies Latest reply: Mar 22, 2014 11:40 AM by arkling RSS Branched to a new discussion.
  • m_jward Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    You are kidding right?

    Downloaded my digital copy.

    VHS quality is better.

     

    This is my 1st and last UV/Flixster experience.

    What a rip-off.

     

    Can you say boycott and bypass?

    Buh-buy!

     

    Need a lawsuit against the entertainment industry for manipulation.

    Wont be a liberal left Hollywood when noone can afford their products.

  • FrankMtl Level 3 Level 3 (630 points)

    Just had a Live Chat with Flixter support and they no longer provide an iTunes code. I purchased The Hobbit from Amazon and having used UV in the past with Harry Potter, the experience is one i do not want to repeat. The cs rep remained unfazed and in essence said, "Tough luck" try again in the future when we update the software.

    Guess I'll go the Handbrake way.

  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (73,360 points)

    m_jward wrote:

     

    You are kidding right?

    What do you think avb25 (whom you responded to) is kidding about in his 2 year old post?

    Downloaded my digital copy.

    VHS quality is better.

     

    Except it's not.

    VHS is ~240 lines.

    SD is 480.

  • Verticalabama Level 1 Level 1 (65 points)

    I also picked up The Hobbit today, only to be disappointed to see that it was UV only. I (stupidly) made the assumption that anything with a UV copy would also be redeemable in iTunes, because I also picked up Les Mis, and that came with UV + an iTunes Digital Copy. I didn't realize there were discs out there that ONLY came with UV versions. Dumb.

  • FrankMtl Level 3 Level 3 (630 points)

    Lesson learned for both of us. I sent Warner Bros. an email stating my disappointment. Even if they don't (and they won't ) answer perhaps worth you sending one too to let them know.I have a funny feeling that we'll be seeing less and less physical movies packaged with both UV and iTunes; studio's way of telling Apple they're not happy.

    If that will eb the case then my collection will be iTunes only and screw the studios.

  • Hotwheels_McG Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Sense when is it illegal to make a personal copy of your own DVD? It is only illegal if you try to sell or distribute copies. But when you purchase it, you have the right to view it on all your devices. They tried to push that one through fort and lost. Now rip a copy of a DVD you got from say Netflix? That is illegal.

  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (73,360 points)

    Hotwheels_McG wrote:

     

    Sense when is it illegal to make a personal copy of your own DVD?

    It's not illegal to make apersonal copy of your own (commercial purchase) DVD.

    It IS illegal to break the encryption on that DVD. And the only way to copy it is to break the encryption.

    This is in the DMCA - Digital Milleniunm Copyright Act (2000).

     

    It is only illegal if you try to sell or distribute copies.

    You mean it is also illegal to do this.

     

    But when you purchase it, you have the right to view it on all your devices.

    Viewing on all devices and breaking the encryption are completely separate issues.

  • mrbofus Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Hotwheels_McG wrote:

     

    Sense when is it illegal to make a personal copy of your own DVD? It is only illegal if you try to sell or distribute copies. But when you purchase it, you have the right to view it on all your devices. They tried to push that one through fort and lost. Now rip a copy of a DVD you got from say Netflix? That is illegal.

     

    It has been illegal to circumvent the copy protection that is on most commercial DVDs since the DMCA (Digital Millenium Copyright Act) was made law, so I think it's been illegal for at least 13 years, if not longer.  The relevant part of the law is in Title 17, Chapter 12 of the United States Code, where it states, "No person shall circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title."

     

    So if you have a DVD of a home movie someone made after filming their kid's music recital or whatever, odds are that they didn't put any copy protection on it, so you're legally OK to rip it.  But pretty much every commercial DVD (movies, documentaries, TV shows, etc...) has copy protection, so it's illegal to rip those, even if you own it.  The big case that determined this was RealNetworks v. DVD Copy Control Association, I believe.  RealNetworks was found to be in violation of the DMCA because their software circumvented the copy protection on DVDs. 

     

    A lot of people do rip DVDs and the reason it seems legally OK is because the law isn't strictly enforced because it's virtually impossible to enforce.  But if your home were to get searched for some reason and DVD rips were found, you could be prosecuted for that. 

     

    When you buy a DVD, you have the right to view it on any device that doesn't circumvent the copy protection.  i.e., DVD players, computers with optical drives, etc...You are not buying the rights to watch the movie when you buy a DVD, you are buying the rights to watch that particular DVD on a device that doesn't circumvent the copy protection on that DVD.

     

    It stinks, and it doesn't make sense in the legal sense of "fair use" which states that portions of copyrighted works can be used without the owner's permission as long as it's not for profit along with some other guidelines.  I don't agree with the DMCA in this regard, but the law is the law.  For now, anyways. 

    iMac, OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.3)
  • Hotwheels_McG Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    mrbofus wrote:

     

    Hotwheels_McG wrote:

     

    Sense when is it illegal to make a personal copy of your own DVD? It is only illegal if you try to sell or distribute copies. But when you purchase it, you have the right to view it on all your devices. They tried to push that one through fort and lost. Now rip a copy of a DVD you got from say Netflix? That is illegal.

     

    It has been illegal to circumvent the copy protection that is on most commercial DVDs since the DMCA (Digital Millenium Copyright Act) was made law, so I think it's been illegal for at least 13 years, if not longer.  The relevant part of the law is in Title 17, Chapter 12 of the United States Code, where it states, "No person shall circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title."

     

    So if you have a DVD of a home movie someone made after filming their kid's music recital or whatever, odds are that they didn't put any copy protection on it, so you're legally OK to rip it.  But pretty much every commercial DVD (movies, documentaries, TV shows, etc...) has copy protection, so it's illegal to rip those, even if you own it.  The big case that determined this was RealNetworks v. DVD Copy Control Association, I believe.  RealNetworks was found to be in violation of the DMCA because their software circumvented the copy protection on DVDs. 

     

    A lot of people do rip DVDs and the reason it seems legally OK is because the law isn't strictly enforced because it's virtually impossible to enforce.  But if your home were to get searched for some reason and DVD rips were found, you could be prosecuted for that. 

     

    When you buy a DVD, you have the right to view it on any device that doesn't circumvent the copy protection.  i.e., DVD players, computers with optical drives, etc...You are not buying the rights to watch the movie when you buy a DVD, you are buying the rights to watch that particular DVD on a device that doesn't circumvent the copy protection on that DVD.

     

    It stinks, and it doesn't make sense in the legal sense of "fair use" which states that portions of copyrighted works can be used without the owner's permission as long as it's not for profit along with some other guidelines.  I don't agree with the DMCA in this regard, but the law is the law.  For now, anyways. 

    Thanks for the clerifying info.  As ubnoxious as the truth is. When will they start saying " yes you can buy this pepsi but only you con consume it.  You cannot share it or give it to someone else after you have opened it."  I know that isn't the exact same thing, but the principle is the same.  They may as well not sell copy's at all and force us to rent them every time we want to watch them. But that wouldn't make them as much money as most people generally don't watch a movie more then 2-3 times even once they own it. I know i only watch about 5% of the movies I own more than that.  Which is why I tend to rent more than i buy these days. Only buying te 5% that i would watch over and over again.

  • Hotwheels_McG Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Chris CA wrote:

     

    Hotwheels_McG wrote:

     

    Sense when is it illegal to make a personal copy of your own DVD?

    It's not illegal to make apersonal copy of your own (commercial purchase) DVD.

    It IS illegal to break the encryption on that DVD. And the only way to copy it is to break the encryption.

    This is in the DMCA - Digital Milleniunm Copyright Act (2000).

     

    It is only illegal if you try to sell or distribute copies.

    You mean it is also illegal to do this.

     

    But when you purchase it, you have the right to view it on all your devices.

    Viewing on all devices and breaking the encryption are completely separate issues.

    Thanks for your, simpilar, clerification. read also my resonse to mrbofus 

  • hatrick90 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    easy way to do it is get and ultraviolet account and download flixster on your device. once youve done that go online and sign in to flixster by connecting to ultraviolet (it will ask you if you want to connect) once youve download the films via flixster they will show up on your device and able to watch

  • Patty1 Level 1 Level 1 (105 points)

    How does that help anyone view the movie in iTunes? The title of this thread is "Transfer ultraviolet digital copy dvd to iTunes, not Flixster?" Everyone here knows you can watch Ultraviolet movies with Flixster.

  • arkling Level 1 Level 1 (20 points)

    no offense but if we wanted to watch content in other apps (like flixster) we wouldn't be in this thread in the first place.

  • Howard Brazee Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I got a reply from Flixter telling me how easy it is to download the movies to my iDevice.

     

    But with the Wi-Fi where I live, it took a couple of hours to download my movie to my Mac.   Downloading it separately to any device I want to view it from is not reasonable.

     

    So UltraViolet is useless until someone comes up with a conversion program.

  • bailey#70 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Clearly things are moving away from iTunes digital copies at a faster rate... I saw one Blu Ray in the shops late last week (can't remember what title it was). The blue band at the top said "+ Digital Copy" but it didn't specify Ultraviolet or iTunes, there was an Ultraviolet sticker on the box though and the only indication that it was not iTunes compatible was in the small print on the back (it can't have been much more than 2mm in height and I had trouble reading it).

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