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Monitor calibration

1333 Views 4 Replies Latest reply: Apr 7, 2013 9:56 AM by MarkPek RSS
MarkPek Level 1 Level 1 (145 points)
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Mar 20, 2013 8:13 AM

Does anyone have a view on ColorMunki Smile vs. ColorMunki Display?  For use on a 15" MacBook Pro (non-retina) and eventually (I hope!) on a new iMac.

MacBook Pro, OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.2), Aperture 3.4.3, iPad 2, iPod Touch
  • Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6 (11,570 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 6, 2013 3:39 PM (in response to MarkPek)

    MarkPek wrote:

     

    Does anyone have a view on ColorMunki Smile vs. ColorMunki Display?  For use on a 15" MacBook Pro (non-retina) and eventually (I hope!) on a new iMac.

    Hi Mark.

     

    Are you still interested in these questions?  I'm happy to tell you what I know.  I don't know what the difference is between the Smile and the Display.  The Display can calibrate a projector.  Is that the only difference?  How much more does the Display cost?

     

    I have (and recommend, for entry-level color management) the Color Munki Photo.  It allows on to calibrate monitors and projectors, and create printer/paper profiles.  If you print to a good standard printer -- something similar to the Epson 3880 -- and you are satisfied with Epson papers, you don't need to make your own printer/paper profiles.  The Epson profiles are better than you can do with "over the counter" equipment.

     

    (Added) The Retina displays require no special calibrators.

     

    --Kirby.

     

    Message was edited by: Kirby Krieger

  • Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6 (11,570 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 6, 2013 4:00 PM (in response to MarkPek)

    MarkPek wrote:

     

    So Mpix told me I needed to calibrate my monitor, but does that really make sense?  If prints at home are great and Apple books are good, doesn't that mean I'm at least basically in the right ballpark?  How would calibrating my monitor improve the Mpix pics?  I mean, doesn't the evidence suggest that things are probably OK with my monitor?

    Yes, if you are printing to two different printers, one of which is a professional lab, and the prints match your display (perhaps even with soft-proofing), it is unreasonable to expect that calibrating your display would bring large changes to the results you see from MPix.

     

    The difference between "great" at home, and "good" from Apple, makes me wonder if there isn't some mis-calibration that is somehow emphasized with MPix. 

     

    The advice you got is good.  No one can really make any suggestions until your display is calibrated using a hardware device.  (At which point you can begin trouble-shooting why MPix and Shutterfly are creating "muddy and flat" prints from your files.)

     

    Calibration is cool and useful.  International standards of color specification and reproduction where developed so that there would be one standard worldwide.  A "profile" (horrible name, imho -- should be called something like a "correction plot") is a set of equations that translates what your device creates from any instruction (e.g.: "set pixel n to {124,231,004}") to this worldwide standard.  The goal is for each instruction to produce the same color on all devices.  The only way to do that is through an objective feedback loop based on a common standard.  The "loop" is completely by hardware calibration.

     

    HTH.

     

    --Kirby.

     

    Message was edited by: Kirby Krieger

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