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how to export canon hv 20 film from fcp

435 Views 4 Replies Latest reply: Apr 3, 2013 6:11 PM by Shane Ross RSS
movie novice Calculating status...
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Apr 3, 2013 3:01 PM

I used a Canon HV20 to film movies in HDV 1080i60.  I used an old Macbook to edit and export movies in FCP 6.  Now I have a new imac and am using FCP 7.  When I used to use FCP 6 I found that if I exported: 1) using quicktime conversion, 2) for settings, I selected "none", set sound to "best quality" and put the format at HD 1040x1080 16:9 and did not check letterbox or deinterlacing, the movies would come out better.  The resulting .mov file would be huge, though. 

 

With FCP 7, I was told to export using "export quicktime" and to select a self-contained movie, but the quality isn't as good as when I did the above steps in the older version.  What do I need to do to obtain the best quality output?  I am using compressor and DVD Studio Pro to produce a DVD. 

 

also, I had purchased a new, low level canon that filmed in HD but it has ACHVD format.  What is the best way to bring the footage into FCP 7?  I was told to do the log and transfer and did that, but the footage doesn't look very good.  Is there anything I can do to fix it?  Thank you.

iMac, OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.3)
  • David Harbsmeier Level 7 Level 7 (29,560 points)
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    Apr 3, 2013 3:30 PM (in response to movie novice)

    >1) using quicktime conversion, 2) for settings, I selected "none", set sound to "best quality" and put the format at HD 1040x1080 16:9 and did not check letterbox or deinterlacing, the movies would come out better.  The resulting .mov file would be huge, though.

    The file size will vary depending on which HD format you used when exporting, but regardless, your video is still in HD.  Since DVD in standard definition only, naturally it won't look as good as the HD version.

     

    To get the best quality DVD, use the workflow you've been using with FCP 7 (export a QuickTime Movie, then use the file in Compressor) is the right way to go.  To get better quality, you can duplicate one of Compressor's DVD presets and custom tune it to your movie.

     

    -DH

  • Shane Ross Level 8 Level 8 (41,655 points)
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    Apr 3, 2013 3:39 PM (in response to David Harbsmeier)

    Note that a DVD is 720x480...Standard Def.  Not High Def like the camera you shot it with, and the sequence settings you used to edit, so it won't look nearly as crisp and clean.

     

    HOWEVER...if you have a BluRay player...and want to author a BluRay disk...use the SHARE option in FCP to make a BluRay...HD...disc.

  • Shane Ross Level 8 Level 8 (41,655 points)
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    Apr 3, 2013 6:11 PM (in response to movie novice)

    >I just highlight the clips when I'm done editing and rendering whatever needs to be rendered and select export "quicktime movie".  Does that mean it will automatically be the best quality?

     

    Yup. If you have HDV material, in an HDV timeline...and you export a self contained QT movie using sequence settings...that's lossless.  Lossless capture from the camera as HDV...edited as HDV...exported as HDV. All digital...1's and 0's.  Zero quality loss. 

     

    >In compressor, what can I do to "make it better"?

     

    You can't.  Your footage is what your footage is.  Your source is HDV...you export HDV.  You send out what you got.  Your footage is 1440x1080 8-bit 4:2:0.  Nothing will make it "better."  BUT...if you do any color correction to that footage, any filters...and you use an HDV sequence...you are rendering 8-bit 4:2:0...quality will suffer a little. If you use a ProRes 1920x1080 sequence...that's 4:2:2 10-bit, so the color correction and filters will render out a little cleaner.  And by a little, I mean a little.  Something that you'd notice when playing on the big screen, or directly out to a TV from your computer. But nothing that will make much difference when you then compress for DVD, or even BluRay.

     

    >I usually move the .mov file to compressor and select "DVD Best quality 90-min.".  Do you mean I should use that or something else?

     

    That's the best you can get with the tools at hand.  The BEST method is to have a professional encoding facility do the work and press a DVD.  But that's pretty spendy.  I use the above method all the time.

     

    >I know that the standard def version I end up with isn't going to be as crisp and clean, but some parts are actually blurry on my TV.  Of course, my TV because is an older one.  Is that the reason?

     

    SD TV, or HDTV?  If HDTV...you have to take into account that you had HD footage that you compressed to SD, and are now blowing back up to HD again.  Yeah, it will be soft.  And HOW it is upconverted/blown up to work on the HDTV is big too.  Is the TV doing the upconversion? Or is the DVD player?  If I use a standard def player on my TV...the DVDs look like crap.  But, if I use my HD DVD player (the format that lost to BluRay) and play a standard DVD...it upscales it very well. 

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